Port Alberni Courses

Port Alberni Campus

Join the vibrant community of learners at NIC’s Port Alberni campus. NIC offers a range of Academic and Continuing Education courses.

Start your university degree in your own community. NIC University Transfer courses, Associate of Arts and Science degrees, Flexible Pre-Major and Education Pathways transfer seamlessly to universities across BC to help you meet your academic and career goals, on your schedule. Call 1-800-715-0914 to book an appointment with an educational advisor and create your study plan.

Fall Term

An introduction to biological science containing similar material to that of BC Biology 12. This course covers scientific methods and principles, cell biology, genetics, and human anatomy and physiology. Details...

This is one of a pair of biology course for science majors that introduce students to the biological concepts necessary to continue into secondy-year biology. This is designed to provide students with a general survey of major areas of biology. Topics include biological chemistry, cellular organization and respiration, photosynthesis, and plant and animal structure and function. The course includes an extensive laboratory component. Details...

This course is the first half of a comprehensive survey of human structure and functions. Topics include: biochemistry, cell biology, genetics, and the anatomy and physiology of the integumentary musculoskeletal, nervous and endocrine systems. An extensive laboratory component is included. Details...

This course is designed for students requiring an introductory chemistry course as a prerequisite for further chemistry studies or for entry into various technical or career programs. The material covered is similar to B.C. Chemistry 11 and the two courses can be regarded as equivalent for most purposes. Note: The distance course requires three 1-day lab sessions (all compulsory). Lab sessions for distance students will be held at selected locations. Students considering the distance option should check dates and locations for lab sessions. Details...

CHE 110 and 111, Chemical Principles I and II, are 1st-year university-level foundation courses in chemistry designed as essential prerequisites to further courses in chemistry. CHE 110 includes an introduction to chemical reactions and equations, energy in chemical systems, and the structures and properties of atoms, molecules, gases, liquids, solids, and solutions. Details...

This course covers calculus of one variable with applications to the life sciences. The content includes limits, differentiation of polynomial, rational, radical, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions; applications of differentiation - graphing and optimization problems; exponential growth and decay; integration and areas - techniques, exponential models; Taylor polynomials; introduction to differential equations. Details...

This course introduces the basic concepts and techniques of descriptive and inferential statistics. It is designed to help students develop a working knowledge of statistics, as well as an awareness of the practical applications of statistics in diverse fields such as the biological and social sciences and business. Topics include: descriptive statistics, data collection, probability theory, probability distributions, sampling distribution of a statistic, estimation of a parameter and test of hypotheses for one population, estimation and test of hypotheses for two or more populations, and bivariate analysis. Details...

MAT 133 is an introduction to matrix algebra. It is a required course for students planning to transfer into a University engineering program. Topics include complex numbers, systems of linear equations, matrix operations, determinants, linear transformations, independence, eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Credit will normally be granted for only one of MAT 133 or MAT 200. Details...

MAT 162 and MAT 163 together offer a first year university mathematics course for students entering an elementary education program. Topics covered in MAT 162 include: Set theory and Venn diagrams, symbolic logic, systems of numeration, computation in systems with different bases, mathematical systems, prime numbers, prime factorization and equivalence and order relations, real numbers and their representations, basic concepts of algebra. Details...

MAT 163 is the second half of a first year university mathematics course for students entering an elementary education program. Topics include: graphs, functions, solving equations and inequalities of the first degree; coordinate geometry; introduction to probability and statistics; measurement and the metric system. Details...

Calculus I and II together comprise a 1st-year course in calculus. MAT 181 - Differential calculus of both algebraic and transcendental functions. Topics include: limits and continuity, the derivative - definition, rules, implicit differentiation; applications - curve sketching, maximum-minimum and related rates problems; differentials; antiderivatives. Students will learn how to use a computer algebra system in the lab to enhance their understanding of calculus concepts. Details...

College Preparatory Physics I is designed to provide students with the equivalent of ABE Advanced Level Physics or Grade 11 Physics. The content of the course includes: measurement, kinematics in one dimension, dynamics in one dimension, Newton's laws, friction,gravitation, kinetic and potential energy,momentum, heat, wave phenomena applied to sound and electricity. Details...

Introduction to Physics I and II are first year algebra-based courses. They are designed for those students that have a relatively weak background in physics. PHY 100 includes vectors, and scalars, kinematics, dynamics, energy, momentum, rotational motion, thermodynamics, fluids and wave motion. Laboratory work illustrates theoretical concepts and develops laboratory skills and techniques. Details...

Principles of Physics I and II are first year university level (calculus based) foundation courses in physics designed as essential prerequisites to further courses in the physical sciences. PHY 120 includes statics, kinematics and dynamics of particles and rigid bodies; conservation of energy and momentum; vibration, waves, and sound; heat and thermodynamics. This course includes extensive laboratory work intended to illustrate theoretical concepts and to develop laboratory skills. Details...

This is a multi-disciplinary lab science course that will introduce topics in astronomy and space science, including the Solar System and its planets, the space environment, gravitational theory, how to navigate the night sky, as well as current and future space explorations. Details...

Winter Term

An introduction to biological science containing similar material to that of BC Biology 12. This course covers scientific methods and principles, cell biology, genetics, and human anatomy and physiology. Details...

This course, containing similar material to that of BC Biology 12 and meeting the same requirements of BIO 060, is designed for non-science majors who require a science elective, or science students without the necessary prerequisites for BIO 102/BIO 103 and/ or BIO 160/161. Topics include an introduction to concepts in cell biology beginning with basic concepts in chemistry, cell structure, cell energetics, cell division and genetics. The last part of the course will focus on human anatomy and physiology. Throughout the course the connection between topics covered and human health will be emphasized. Details...

This is one of a pair of biology courses for science majors that introduce students to the biological concepts necessary to continue into second-year biology. This course is designed to provide students with a general survey of major areas of biology. Topics include ecology, evolution, cell division, genetics, DNA and genes, classification and diversity. The course includes extensive laboratory components. Details...

This course is the continuation and completion of the comprehensive survey of human structures and functions started in Human Anatomy and Physiology I. It includes an extensive laboratory component. Details...

This course is designed for students requiring an introductory chemistry course as a prerequisite for further chemistry studies or for entry into various technical or career programs. The material covered is similar to B.C. Chemistry 11 and the two courses can be regarded as equivalent for most purposes. Note: The distance course requires three 1-day lab sessions (all compulsory). Lab sessions for distance students will be held at selected locations. Students considering the distance option should check dates and locations for lab sessions. Details...

This course is designed for students requiring a second high school level chemistry course and will transfer as equivalent to B.C. Chemistry 12. Students need a working knowledge of Chemistry 11 before they attempt CHE 060. In CHE 060 students learn gas laws, solutions, reaction rates, chemical equilibrium, acids and bases, redox reactions and electrochemistry. Details...

CHE 111 deals with chemical kinetics, gaseous and aqueous equilibria, chemical thermodynamics, electrochemistry and organic chemistry (structure, nomenclature, functional groups, stereochemistry, substitution reactions). Laboratory work illustrates theoretical concepts and develops laboratory skills and techniques. Details...

This course introduces the basic concepts and techniques of descriptive and inferential statistics. It is designed to help students develop a working knowledge of statistics, as well as an awareness of the practical applications of statistics in diverse fields such as the biological and social sciences and business. Topics include: descriptive statistics, data collection, probability theory, probability distributions, sampling distribution of a statistic, estimation of a parameter and test of hypotheses for one population, estimation and test of hypotheses for two or more populations, and bivariate analysis. Details...

This course covers linear systems and Gauss-Jordan elimination, geometric linear programming, matrices and matrix operations, symbolic logic, set theory, permutations and combinations, discrete probability, including conditional probability and Bayes' formula, random variables and their distributions, expectation, Markov chains. Details...

MAT 162 and MAT 163 together offer a first year university mathematics course for students entering an elementary education program. Topics covered in MAT 162 include: Set theory and Venn diagrams, symbolic logic, systems of numeration, computation in systems with different bases, mathematical systems, prime numbers, prime factorization and equivalence and order relations, real numbers and their representations, basic concepts of algebra. Details...

MAT 163 is the second half of a first year university mathematics course for students entering an elementary education program. Topics include: graphs, functions, solving equations and inequalities of the first degree; coordinate geometry; introduction to probability and statistics; measurement and the metric system. Details...

This course covers: a review of the Fundamental Theorem and area; methods of integration - substitution, integration by parts, trigonometric integrals, trigonometric substitution, partial fractions, and trapezoidal rule; introduction to differential equations; applications of integration - volume, arc length; L'Hospital's rule and improper integrals; infinite sequences and series, tests of convergence for infinite series, Taylor polynomials and series, and applications. Students will use a computer algebra system in the lab to improve their conceptual understanding, aid visualization, and to solve problems. Details...

College Preparatory Physics II is designed to provide students with the equivalent of ABE Provincial Level Physics or Grade 12 Physics. The course includes vectors using trigonometry, kinematics in one and two dimensions, energy and momentum, statics and dynamics, rotational dynamics, vibrations and waves, electromagnetism, and geometric optics. Details...

This is the second of the Introduction to Physics courses. PHY 101 includes light and optics, electricity and magnetism, and special relativity. Laboratory work is used to reinforce theoretical concepts and develop laboratory skills and concepts. Details...

Principles of Physics I and II are first year university level (calculus based) foundation courses in physics designed as essential prerequisites to further courses in the physical sciences. PHY 121 includes electricity and magnetism, light, optics and modern physics. This course includes extensive laboratory work intended to illustrate theoretical concepts and to develop laboratory skills. Details...

This course is an introduction to engineering mechanics for students planning to transfer into a University engineering program. The course introduces a methodology for analysis of forces and moments acting on, or within, rigid bodies, structures and machines that are in static equilibrium. Topics include conditions of equilibrium and applications to particles and rigid bodies; analysis of structures, including beams, trusses and arches; bending moment and shear force diagrams for beams; dry friction. Details...

This is a lab science course that will introduce topics in deep space astronomy including: observational astronomy, stars and stellar evolution, galaxies and galactic evolution, neutron stars, black holes, gravitational waves, extra-solar planets, the Big Bang, dark matter, dark energy, and the possibility of life in the universe. This course will also explore related topics in physics and chemistry such as: light and the electromagnetic spectrum, optics, gravity, relativity, cosmology, and the origin of the chemical elements. Details...

Fall Term

This audio-visual course focuses on the cross-cultural study of human diversity. Topics include patterns of subsistence, linguistics, social, political and economic organization, religion, aesthetics, and the future of humanity. Details...

An introduction to the core concepts, basic data sources, and general research findings in the field of Criminology. A key focus is on elements of continuity and discontinuity between traditional and contemporary theories of crime, deviance, criminality, and social control. Particular attention is paid to the Canadian context. Details...

An introduction to the fundamental principles or jurisprudence and the basic legal institutions of Canada. An examination of the history of Canadian law, the development of the Canadian constitution, the system of Canadian courts, and the roles and responsibilities of members of the legal profession. In addition, an analysis of the nature of legal reasoning, the doctrine of precedent, and the principles of statutory interpretation. Also introduces the fields of contract, torts, administrative law, and family law. Details...

GEO 111 focuses on the complex relationships between people and the environment. With emphasis on the ecosystems approach, it looks at the impacts on human activity and resource exploitation on the environment, and considers the potential for a sustainable society. Topics covered include; energy flow, biogeochemical cycles, ecosystem structure and dynamics, climate change, water resources, marine resources, biodiversity loss, protected areas and endangered species, human population growth, Ecological Footprint Analysis, and environmental world views. Details...

This course provides a general chronological overview of Canadian history in the pre-Confederation era. It introduces some of the major political, social and economic events that shaped early Canadian development. Details...

Major historical events are discussed, and their significance analyzed, in this survey course on British Columbia's history. The roles played by economics, geography, politics and social factors in shaping the province's development will also be examined. Details...

This course is designed as an introduction to the world's major religions, with an emphasis upon those of the Abrahamic tradition: Judaism, Islam and Christianity. It combines an intensive focus upon individual living faiths with study of the different scholarly approaches to understanding religion. Instruction will combine intensive reading, seminar discussion and lecture presentations. Students who have previously earned credit in NIC's HIS 130 are not eligible for credit in LIB 130. Details...

An introduction to selected problems in the philosophy of religion, metaphysics (theory of reality), and epistemology (theory of knowledge). Topics include the existence of God; the nature of mind and its relation to body; computers and consciousness; personal identity and mortality; freewill and determinism; the nature and sources of knowledge; and the justification of scientific beliefs. Details...

The course covers the following topics: research methods; biological bases of behaviour; consciousness; nature, nurture and diversity; development; sensation and perception; learning; and memory. Students are introduced to relevant psychological principles, theories and research findings, and are encouraged to develop an appreciation of the value of psychological research. Details...

PSY 204 provides an introduction to basic research techniques in psychology; emphasis on the conceptual rather than the statistical rationale underlying various research strategies. Areas include the nature of variables, types of measurement, how to generate and test hypotheses, types of validity, and how to interpret and report results. Laboratory exercises and class demonstrations on the processes involved in conducting empirical research. Research process (theory, models, hypotheses, predictions); research ethics; experimental methods; non-experimental methods; validity; reliability; sampling; descriptive statistics; central tendency; variability; inferential statistics; and experimental design. Details...

This course provides an overview of child development up to, but not including adolescence. The impact of genetics and environment, major theories of human development, methods for studying child development, cultural diversity, and development in the physical, cognitive, emotional and social spheres are included. Details...

Introduction to Sociology I introduces the student to some of the major concepts and issues in the discipline of sociology, including culture, socialization, deviance, gender, suicide and discrimination. The course is designed to encourage the student to think more deeply about the relationship between personal troubles and public issues. Details...

Winter term

This course is an introduction to the sub-fields of anthropology: physical anthropology and archaeology. Through readings and audio-visual material, the origins and development of humans and their cultures are explored, including the development of the civilizations of the Old and New World. Details...

An examination of traditional and post-contact aboriginal societies using a culture area approach. This background will lead to consideration of the status of Aboriginal People in contemporary Canadian Society. Details...

An introduction to the structure and operation of the Canadian criminal justice system, including the police, courts, and corrections. Analysis of the patterns of crime and victimization, police discretion and decision-making; criminal sentencing; correctional institutions and community-based models; and the youth justice system. Patterns of contact and conflict between various social groups and the criminal justice system are also examined. Details...

GEO 112 critically examines the complex relations between people and places through key themes and concepts in the cultural, urban and economic fields of human geography. Topics to be studied include: local and popular cultures and landscapes, disappearing peoples, concepts of nature, the agricultural revolutions, global agricultural restructuring, agribusiness, food security, urban and suburban processes, development issues in the less developed world, barriers to and the costs of economic development, globalization, deindustrialization, and social change in the world system. Details...

This introductory course provides an overview of Canadian history since 1867, concentrating on the main lines of political, social and economic development. It analyses important issues such as the Riel Rebellion, the shift from a rural to an urban society, the effects of the two World Wars, the Great Depression, the relations between English and French Canadians, and provincial demands for autonomy. Details...

After a brief exploration of earlier 18th Century events, this course begins with the causes, course and consequences of the French Revolution. This survey course will then examine the major events of the 19th and 20th Centuries. Particular emphasis will be placed on industrialization, the growth of the nation state and imperialism. Social change will also be examined. Details...

This course combines an introduction to the religions of Asia with comparative analysis of some key organizing themes for the study of all world religions. It examines the origins and historical development, the sacred texts, the central tenets, the institutions and rituals of Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism, Confucianism, Taoism and Shinto. It also explores selected core concepts such as sacred space, sacred time, sacred rituals and sacred symbols in a comparative context that uses not only these seven eastern religions but also the Abrahamic tradition and other world religions as reference points. Instruction will combine intensive reading, seminar discussion and lecture presentations. Details...

An exploration of the rich world of ancient and Medieval Roman thought and its modern legacy. In seminars students and faculty examine such topics as Livy, Vergil, The New Testament, Augustine, Dante and Machiavelli. Details...

The course covers the following topics: research methods; thinking and language; intelligence; what drives us; emotions, stress and health; social psychology; personality; psychological disorders; therapy. Students are introduced to relevant psychological principles, theories and research findings, and are encouraged to develop an appreciation of the value of psychological research. Details...

The course covers selected disorders listed in the current version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), focusing on the nature of each disorder, biopsychosocial explanations of each disorder, and relevant treatments. Legal and ethical issues are also addressed. Students are introduced to relevant psychological theories and research findings, and are encouraged to develop an appreciation of the value of psychological research. Details...

This course provides an overview of human development from adolescence through old age. Topics include the impact of genetics and environment, development in adolescence and adulthood, cultural diversity, change and development in the physical, cognitive, emotional and social spheres, and death, dying and grieving. Details...

SOC 111 is the second course in a full 1st-year university level introductory sociology course. It addresses specific social institutions such as the family and education, work and politics as well as social problems such as social change and inequality. The course is based on a critical evaluation of the major institutions of modern capitalism. Details...

Fall term

ENG 108 is a first year writing seminar focusing on method and craft in poetry drama and screenplays. This seminar focuses on the practice of writing with an emphasis on learning the craft of writing through discussions, exercises, and peer critiquing. Students create a portfolio of work including both poetry and a play or screenplay. Details...

ENG 115 involves the study of university level critical analysis and the production of expository and persuasive writing appropriate to university level discourse across the curriculum. A variety of rhetorical models are studied and practiced. Emphasis is placed on research, documentation and the writing of a research paper. Students may not receive credit for ENG 115 if they have previously completed ENG 116 or ENG 117. Details...

ENG 116 introduces university-level research and writing in the humanities and social sciences and/or natural sciences with a specific focus on contemporary Indigenous issues in Canada. Students will critically analyze and study the writing, oral and aural practices of Indigenous scholars and teachers in a variety of disciplines and settings. Emphasis is placed on respecting and interweaving non-Indigenous and Indigenous ways of knowing and research methodologies in writing a post-secondary research paper. Students may not receive credit for ENG 116 if they have previously completed ENG 115, ENG 117 or ENG 125. Details...

This course is an introduction to university-level research and writing in the humanities and social sciences and/or natural sciences. It is designed to help students acquire the research skills and understand the writing practices used by scholars in a variety of academic disciplines. As a way of focusing discussion, students will examine different disciplinary approaches to a single research topic. Note: Credit will only be granted for ENG 115 or ENG 117 or ENG 125. Details...

In this course, you will become familiar with selected writers and their works and themes; develop and understanding of literary terms, techniques, and styles, and analyze fiction, drama, poetry and literary non-fiction using a range of critical approaches. The long-term objective of this course is to gain a greater understanding of yourself and others. You will, as Frederick Nietzsche commands, "Read...your own life and from this understanding the hieroglyphs of universal life!" Students may not receive credit for ENG 122 if they have previously taken ENG 120, ENG 121 or ENG 126. Details...

English 160 is an applied writing course that focuses on communication skills required in professional and business fields. Students will learn how to use language effectively, produce general correspondence, synthesize research for formal report and proposal writing, and design effective documents. Details...

This course is a chronological survey of English-Canadian poetry, fiction, and nonfiction from the sixteenth century to the early twentieth century. It focuses on narratives of exploration and encounter, emigration and settlement, and the emergence of Canada as a nation on the world stage. The course explores the questions surrounding the relationship between Canadian literature and national identity. It seeks to include a range of voices and examines works that are representative, not only of the dominant literary culture, but of different regions, ethnicities, histories and gender identities Details...

Motifs I and II together make up a complete introductory French program at the university level. With an emphasis on communicative proficiency, and based on the popular French in Action materials, the courses make use of video, audio and print material in order to develop the four language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) and to introduce students to the diversity of the Francophone world. Details...

Motifs III and IV continue the development of the four language skills, self-expression, and cultural insight begun in FRE 100 and 101. Completion of French to this level is the prerequisite for entry into standard 1st-year university French. Details...

This course provides a complete review of French grammar presented within a cultural context. A study of selected literary readings will develop the student's ability to understand and compose short passages, together with typical and provocative articles that will promote active and critical in-class discussions of contemporary issues. Intermediate French I and II are strongly recommended for students who have taken French as a second language. Details...

This course provides a continuation of the study of French grammar at an advanced level. A study of selected literary readings (French and French-Canadian), together with a variety of up-to-date and provocative articles and texts will allow the student to further improve both written and spoken French through practice in conversation, comprehension and composition. Advanced French I and II are strongly recommended for students who have taken the French immersion program. Details...

Introduction to Nuu-chah-nulth Language will focus on: listening techniques, comparing and contrasting Nuu-chah-nulth and English sound patterns and pronunciation, which will lead to words, phrases and sentence-building exercises for conversational Nuu-chah-nulth for various topics: greetings, weather, elders, around the classroom, around the house, and learning songs. Students will also be introduced to electronic learning resources for self-practice. Details...

Introductory Spanish I is a complete introductory Spanish program that provides the students with a solid foundation to communicate proficiently in Spanish as well as to function effectively within the culture in real life situations. Besides emphasizing language acquisition by providing a complete grammar scope, the content of Introductory Spanish I also presents important aspects of culture, customs and values of the Spanish-speaking world providing students with a deeper insight into its diversity while exposing them to authentic language. Details...

This course is designed to further expand students' language skills in Spanish as well as their awareness of the Hispanic culture. It focuses on real communication in meaningful contexts to develop and strengthen students' speaking, listening, reading and writing skills while introducing them to the richness of Hispanic literature and culture. Details...

Winter term

ENG 115 involves the study of university level critical analysis and the production of expository and persuasive writing appropriate to university level discourse across the curriculum. A variety of rhetorical models are studied and practiced. Emphasis is placed on research, documentation and the writing of a research paper. Students may not receive credit for ENG 115 if they have previously completed ENG 116 or ENG 117. Details...

ENG 116 introduces university-level research and writing in the humanities and social sciences and/or natural sciences with a specific focus on contemporary Indigenous issues in Canada. Students will critically analyze and study the writing, oral and aural practices of Indigenous scholars and teachers in a variety of disciplines and settings. Emphasis is placed on respecting and interweaving non-Indigenous and Indigenous ways of knowing and research methodologies in writing a post-secondary research paper. Students may not receive credit for ENG 116 if they have previously completed ENG 115, ENG 117 or ENG 125. Details...

This course is an introduction to university-level research and writing in the humanities and social sciences and/or natural sciences. It is designed to help students acquire the research skills and understand the writing practices used by scholars in a variety of academic disciplines. As a way of focusing discussion, students will examine different disciplinary approaches to a single research topic. Note: Credit will only be granted for ENG 115 or ENG 117 or ENG 125. Details...

In this course, you will become familiar with selected writers and their works and themes; develop and understanding of literary terms, techniques, and styles, and analyze fiction, drama, poetry and literary non-fiction using a range of critical approaches. The long-term objective of this course is to gain a greater understanding of yourself and others. You will, as Frederick Nietzsche commands, "Read...your own life and from this understanding the hieroglyphs of universal life!" Students may not receive credit for ENG 122 if they have previously taken ENG 120, ENG 121 or ENG 126. Details...

English 127 introduces students to Indigenous literatures in Canada with emphasis on their historical, political, and cultural contexts. Students will study works selected from various genres, including story-telling, both oral and written, non-fiction writing, novels, short stories, drama, and poetry, as well as art, film, and digital media. They will learn to write reflective and scholarly analysis by interweaving Indigenous and Western approaches to textual interpretation and literary criticism. Students may not receive credit for ENG 127 if they have previously completed ENG 120, ENG 121 or ENG 126. Details...

English 160 is an applied writing course that focuses on communication skills required in professional and business fields. Students will learn how to use language effectively, produce general correspondence, synthesize research for formal report and proposal writing, and design effective documents. Details...

This course introduces students to contemporary Canadian literature including poetry,short fiction and the novel. Key topics may include nationality, regional identity, ethnicity, gender, postcolonial theory, and wilderness vs. urban influences. Details...

This is the second of the pair of courses, Motifs I and II. Details...

This is the second of the pair of courses, III and IV. Details...

This is the second of the pair of courses, Intermediate French I and II. Details...

This is the second of the pair of courses, Advanced French I and II. Details...

Introductory Spanish II is a complete introductory Spanish program that provides the students with a solid foundation to communicate proficiently in Spanish as well as to function effectively within the culture in real life situations. Besides emphasizing language acquisition by providing a complete grammar scope, the content of also presents important aspects of culture, customs and values of the Spanish-speaking world providing students with a deeper insight into its diversity while exposing them to authentic language. Details...

This course is designed to further expand students' language skills in Spanish as well as their awareness of the Hispanic culture. It focuses on real communication in meaningful contexts to develop and strengthen students' speaking, listening, reading and writing skills while introducing them to the richness of Hispanic literature and culture. Details...

Fall term

This course introduces the principles of microeconomics and demonstrates how these principles apply to current Canadian economic issues. Topics include supply and demand analysis, consumer behaviour, production and cost, market structure, trade, and the economic role of government. Details...

This course presents a balanced and integrated introductory view of financial accounting. Students will be introduced to financial statement preparation procedures and techniques as well as to the fundamental analysis of financial statements for decision makers. The concepts and principles (Generally Accepted Accounting Principles) that link preparation and use are given explicit attention. Credit will only be granted for either BUS 100 or BUS 112. Details...

This course will provide the student with the skills necessary to solve common, practical business problems that employ the mathematics of finance. Topics covered include linear applications for business, simple interest and discount, compound interest, amortization, general annuities, bonds, and capital decision models. Emphasis is on practical problem solving in business. Details...

This course introduces students to the basic management functions of planning and decision-making, organizing resources, leading and motivating groups and individuals, and controlling worker output to maximize effectiveness and efficiency. Students learn about the importance of management to the success of all organizations. Details...

This course provides students with a broad range of basic business skills. Topics include business plan development, legal issues of business start-up and management, financing, marketing, and basic record keeping for a small business venture. Details...

This course introduces students to the basic concepts and principles of marketing as it relates to the public, private, and not-for-profit sectors. Particular emphasis will be given to the topics of assessing dynamic marketing environments and developing a marketing strategy and marketing mix. Details...

Winter term

This course introduces students to the basic management functions of planning and decision-making, organizing resources, leading and motivating groups and individuals, and controlling worker output to maximize effectiveness and efficiency. Students learn about the importance of management to the success of all organizations. Details...

This course provides students with a broad range of basic business skills. Topics include business plan development, legal issues of business start-up and management, financing, marketing, and basic record keeping for a small business venture. Details...

This course introduces students to the basic concepts and principles of marketing as it relates to the public, private, and not-for-profit sectors. Particular emphasis will be given to the topics of assessing dynamic marketing environments and developing a marketing strategy and marketing mix. Details...

This course introduces students to computing concepts and skills using industry standard business application software in a hands-on Windows environment. Students will learn to use word processing, spreadsheet, database and presentation software applications and be able to apply them to various organizational functions. This course provides a practical base for developing sound analytical computing skills necessary in today's business world. Details...

This course analyzes the determination of national income, employment, and the price level. Topics include business cycles, fiscal and monetary policy, and economic growth. Details...

Continuing Education offers accessible, short-term education and training focused to meet your personal and professional development needs.

Obtain the necessary certification to work in the food service industry. This course covers important food safety and worker safety information including food borne illness, receiving and storing food, preparing food, serving food, cleaning and sanitizing. Certificates will be valid for 5 years from the date of issue. Note: Bring a packed lunch, beverage and government-issued picture ID to class. Details...

Learn CPR, choking and hemorrhage control and minor wound care according to WSBC Regulations, Part 3 Guidelines (3.14 - 3.21). This WorkSafeBC course is an excellent entry level WSBC First Aid course that is a recognized by local industry. Certification is by WSBC and is valid for three years. Details...

This course is designed for parents and caregivers of children up to eight years of age. Topics include: recognition of home hazards, accident prevention, and safety education. Skills focus on respiratory distress, CPR, AED, bleeding management and common first aid situations. This course is acknowledged by the Ministry of Health and the Provincial Child Care Facilities Licensing Board. Certification period is three years, but yearly recertification in CPR Level B is recommended. Details...

This is a comprehensive first aid course for those who require the skills and knowledge necessary to deal with life-threatening situations and to give assistance to people in physical distress. The RC Standard First Aid course is now recognized by WorkSafe BC as a valid equivalent certification for the Occupational First Aid Level 1. Certification is transferable between provinces and recognized nationally for workplace requirements. Includes all of the content of the Emergency First Aid course (FAC 020) plus injuries due to heat and cold, medical conditions, bone and joint injuries, head and spinal injuries. Certification is by the Red Cross and is valid for a period of three years, but yearly recertification in CPR Level C is recommended. Details...

The Marine Basic First Aid course meets defined Federal Transport Canada Marine Safety Training Standards for Marine First Aid. This course provides individuals with a basic training level of First Aid and CPR required by the Marine Industry. Certification is by the Canadian Red Cross and Marine Transport Canada with a certification period of five years. Details...

This is an adult, child and infant CPR course. Skills taught and practiced include one- and two-rescuer CPR; Adult, child, and infant CPR techniques; management of the obstructed airway and Automated External Defibrillation (AED). Skills taught and practiced include one-rescuer CPR, choking, barrier devices/pocketmasks, and AED. Certification period is three years, but recommended for one year. Details...

This course provides shippers, handlers and drivers with a clear understanding of the basic transportation of dangerous goods, which meet the requirements of federal and provincial legislation. The flexible online format allows participants to complete the course at their own pace and convenience. Note: You must complete this course within 30 days. Email address required. Ask for information sheet when registering. Details...

This detailed and interactive online course provides a basic understanding of confined spaces in the workplace, legislation that governs them and the hazards associated with entering them. Please note: You must complete this course within 30 days. Email address required. Details...

Receive thorough training that meets or exceeds all WorkSafe BC and CSA regulations and standards. Each student will be evaluated and those able to demonstrate a minimum level of operational competence receive an Ives & Associates document of successful program completion. Note: Ask for information sheet when registering. Details...

Learn the skills required to work in the building service custodial field. Topics include: attitudes, ground rules, WHMIS, blood borne pathogen and sharps safety, hanta virus awareness, basic cleaning chemistry, cleaning procedures overview, interior office cleaning, restroom cleaning, daily floor maintenance and classroom cleaning. Note: Please bring a bagged lunch and beverage. Details...

Gain an understanding of the accounting equations, debits and credits, record keeping, bank reconciliation, maintaining a general ledger, using a columnar journal and preparing simple financial statements. This course is valuable to small business owners and non-profit groups as well as for those needing to upgrade job skills. Note: Please bring a calculator to class. Details...

Set-up and use all six modules in Sage 50 -1 accounting software (formerly Simply Accounting) with emphasis on the general ledger, accounts payable, receivable and payroll modules. The job cost and inventory modules may also be introduced. Details...

Join us for presentations by knowledgeable members of the community in the three areas that most adults need advice on when making estate decisions: financial planning, estate planning and final wishes. Our presenters include: Chris Gow, a CGA experienced with estate finances and dealing with the new rules regarding financial planning for those putting their affairs in order. Matthew Dearin, a Notary Public specifically versed in estate legalities, how to set up Wills and Estates. Justin Johannesson, a Family Services Counselor and Margaret Vatamaniuck, Funeral Director who are experienced in prearranging funerals as well as how to put final wishes in place. This session is designed to encompass a broad range of information and participants will have some time for more specific questions and answers at the end. Details...

Come and learn how to use your iPhone camera with confidence. Graham Fox will cover functions including; settings, camera access, camera controls, aspect ratios and panorama, exposure and focal points, how to read QR codes and how to scan documents. The course will also cover using the iPhone App and using settings, storage, editing, albums and storage optimizations/options. Instructor: Graham Fox Details...

We will examine some available apps for the iPad platform. Learn how to make presentations, listen to music, take pictures, keep track of your food intake, take a tour of the Solar System, read a newspaper, make a movie, crunch some numbers, download free books, check the latest hockey scores, play games, send email, update your Facebook page. The possibilities are indeed endless. Details...

Join Linda St. Claire, a retired Mental Health Nurse/Counselor, for this two-part interactive series which includes developing awareness, coping skills and strategies to deal with the positives and possible hurdles during this interesting, and sometimes challenging, phase of life. Each session will include a short, fun and easy relaxation at the end. Details...

LGBTQ (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Questioning) Information Session. In this interactive class we will be learning about the LGBTQ spectrum through a short movie, various activities and guided discussions. Details...

Join our presenters as they share their travel adventures to places such as: Cuba, Europe (including cruising the British Isles) and Australia. Details...

Join Linda and Walt Fenske as they share their journeys to Cuba, two decades apart. In 1997, they travelled to Varadero on an all-inclusive holiday. On numerous day trips away from the tourist area, they saw heartbreaking poverty and inspirational people. This session will examine that journey and compare it to their trip back in 2017 and the dramatic change they saw in the country. Details...

Join Robert Gunn & Janis Naire as they share their travels in search of the departure points of their great grandparents, with a side trip to Bosnia. They explore 19th and 20th century Scottish, Irish and Croatian emigration to the 'new world', using travel snaps. Why, and from where, did they come, and what did they experience once settled in four new countries - Canada, South Africa Australia and New Zealand. Details...

Join Bob Perkins as he guides you through a 6-day tour of the bustling city and surroundings of Sydney Australia - including beaches, caves, botanical gardens and its extensive ferry system. After that, Bob will lead you on a 14-day cruise to Melbourne and a circumnavigation of New Zealand. The topography, vegetation and wildlife is amazingly varied at each port-of-call as you move from the South Island to the North Island. If you have never been to this part of the world, now is your chance to get a glimpse of life "down-under". Details...

Join Bill & Katy Lekich as they share their traveling experiences through the British Isles. Starting with spending a couple of days in Normandy, they then boarded a cruise with exciting stops such as London, Guernsey, Cork, Dublin, Liverpool, Belfast, Glasgow, Invergordon, Edinburgh & back to LeHavre, France. They finished their adventure with four days sightseeing in Paris. Instructors: Bill & Katy Lekich Details...