ITV Courses

Spring 2019

English 098 is designed to prepare students for the reading, writing, and critical thinking demands they will encounter in either the workplace, college programs or university-level courses. The course assists students to develop reading, research and reference skills and write effective sentences, paragraphs, and a variety of essays. A research essay or a research assignment will also be produced. They will also apply critical thinking skills to situations ranging from problem solving to media literacy. This course satisfies the requirements for English in the ABE Provincial Level Diploma Program. Credit will only be granted for either ENG 096 or ENG 098. Details...
This course provides a general chronological overview of Canadian history in the pre-Confederation era. It introduces some of the major political, social and economic events that shaped early Canadian development. Details...
Foundations of Mathematics includes rates, systems of linear equations, quadratic functions, geometry, statistics, trigonometry, measurement, and logical reasoning. Details...
This course introduces the basic concepts and techniques of descriptive and inferential statistics. It is designed to help students develop a working knowledge of statistics, as well as an awareness of the practical applications of statistics in diverse fields such as the biological and social sciences and business. Topics include: descriptive statistics, data collection, probability theory, probability distributions, sampling distribution of a statistic, estimation of a parameter and test of hypotheses for one population, estimation and test of hypotheses for two or more populations, and bivariate analysis. Details...
An examination of ethical issues arising in the contemporary business context. A number of classical ethical theories are introduced and applied to a variety of concrete problems such as whistle-blowing, product safety, employee rights, discrimination, international business, the environment, and investing. Emphasis is on mastery of the key ethical concepts and their application to real-life situations. Details...
This course provides an overview of child development up to, but not including adolescence. The impact of genetics and environment, major theories of human development, methods for studying child development, cultural diversity, and development in the physical, cognitive, emotional and social spheres are included. Details...

Fall 2019

This audio-visual course focuses on the cross-cultural study of human diversity. Topics include patterns of subsistence, linguistics, social, political and economic organization, religion, aesthetics, and the future of humanity. Details...
An examination of traditional and post-contact aboriginal societies using a culture area approach. This background will lead to consideration of the status of Aboriginal People in contemporary Canadian Society. Details...
This course provides students with a broad range of basic business skills. Topics include business plan development, legal issues of business start-up and management, financing, marketing, and basic record keeping for a small business venture. Details...
College Preparatory Chemistry I is designed to provide students with the equivalent of Grade 11 Chemistry. The content of the course includes: nature of matter, mole concept, chemical reactions, atomic theory, solution chemistry and organic chemistry. Details...
An introduction to the core concepts, basic data sources, and general research findings in the field of Criminology. A key focus is on elements of continuity and discontinuity between traditional and contemporary theories of crime, deviance, criminality, and social control. Particular attention is paid to the Canadian context. Details...
An introduction to the fundamental principles or jurisprudence and the basic legal institutions of Canada. An examination of the history of Canadian law, the development of the Canadian constitution, the system of Canadian courts, and the roles and responsibilities of members of the legal profession. In addition, an analysis of the nature of legal reasoning, the doctrine of precedent, and the principles of statutory interpretation. Also introduces the fields of contract, torts, administrative law, and family law. Details...
This course will expand on the foundational knowledge, skills and values discussed in Part II with more emphasis on application of both guiding and caring and working effectively as part of a team with colleagues, families and community. This will include looking at more challenging behaviours and how to use observation and creative problem solving as part of a team to plan effective intervention. Students will take a closer look at what it means to include families in a meaningful way. Details...
English 098 is designed to prepare students for the reading, writing, and critical thinking demands they will encounter in the workplace, college programs or university-level courses. The course assists students to develop reading, research and reference skills and write a range of technical, professional and academic assignments. They will also apply critical thinking skills to situations ranging from problem solving to media literacy. This course satisfies the requirements for English in the ABE Provincial Level Diploma Program. Credit will only be granted for either ENG 096 or ENG 098. Details...
ENG 116 introduces university-level research and writing in the humanities and social sciences and/or natural sciences with a specific focus on contemporary Indigenous issues in Canada. Students will critically analyze and study the writing, oral and aural practices of Indigenous scholars and teachers in a variety of disciplines and settings. Emphasis is placed on respecting and interweaving non-Indigenous and Indigenous ways of knowing and research methodologies in writing a post-secondary research paper. Students may not receive credit for ENG 116 if they have previously completed ENG 115, ENG 117 or ENG 125. Details...
For 2019 Fall, the topic is narrative and digital media. This course introduces the function of narrative and examines narrative method in a variety of genres such as poetry, fiction, drama, biography, autobiography, essay, film, and textbook. The focus of study will vary according to instructor interest and may include themes such as love and sex, war, crime, death, family, or social justice. Students will be introduced to narratology and will examine the ways in which narrative structures shape understanding of the self and the world. Details...
This course surveys the world of early modern Europe from the flowering of the Renaissance in Italy and northern Europe, through the age of the religious wars in the seventeenth century, the eighteenth century Age of Enlightenment, and developments in eastern Europe and Russia, culminating in the great watershed of the French Revolution. In addition to covering military and political developments, the course also describes the changes wrought in the social and economic lives of the people of the emerging nation states of Europe. Details...
This course is designed as an introduction to the world's major religions, with an emphasis upon those of the Abrahamic tradition: Judaism, Islam and Christianity. It combines an intensive focus upon individual living faiths with study of the different scholarly approaches to understanding religion. Instruction will combine intensive reading, seminar discussion and lecture presentations. Students who have previously earned credit in NIC's HIS 130 are not eligible for credit in LIB 130. Details...
This course is designed as an introduction to the world's major religions, with an emphasis upon those of the Abrahamic tradition: Judaism, Islam and Christianity. It combines an intensive focus upon individual living faiths with study of the different scholarly approaches to understanding religion. Instruction will combine intensive reading, seminar discussion and lecture presentations. Students who have previously earned credit in NIC's HIS 130 are not eligible for credit in LIB 130. Details...
Foundations of Mathematics includes rates, systems of linear equations, quadratic functions, geometry, statistics, trigonometry, measurement, and logical reasoning. Details...
This course covers calculus of one variable with applications to the life sciences. The content includes limits, differentiation of polynomial, rational, radical, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions; applications of differentiation - graphing and optimization problems; exponential growth and decay; integration and areas - techniques, exponential models; Taylor polynomials; introduction to differential equations. Details...
MAT 133 is an introduction to matrix algebra. It is a required course for students planning to transfer into a University engineering program. Topics include complex numbers, systems of linear equations, matrix operations, determinants, linear transformations, independence, eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Credit will normally be granted for only one of MAT 133 or MAT 200. Details...
MAT 133 is an introduction to matrix algebra. It is a required course for students planning to transfer into a University engineering program. Topics include complex numbers, systems of linear equations, matrix operations, determinants, linear transformations, independence, eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Credit will normally be granted for only one of MAT 133 or MAT 200. Details...
Calculus I and II together comprise a 1st-year course in calculus. MAT 181 - Differential calculus of both algebraic and transcendental functions. Topics include: limits and continuity, the derivative - definition, rules, implicit differentiation; applications - curve sketching, maximum-minimum and related rates problems; differentials; antiderivatives. Students will learn how to use a computer algebra system in the lab to enhance their understanding of calculus concepts. Details...
Calculus I and II together comprise a 1st-year course in calculus. MAT 181 - Differential calculus of both algebraic and transcendental functions. Topics include: limits and continuity, the derivative - definition, rules, implicit differentiation; applications - curve sketching, maximum-minimum and related rates problems; differentials; antiderivatives. Students will learn how to use a computer algebra system in the lab to enhance their understanding of calculus concepts. Details...
An introduction to selected problems in the philosophy of religion, metaphysics (theory of reality), and epistemology (theory of knowledge). Topics include the existence of God; the nature of mind and its relation to body; computers and consciousness; personal identity and mortality; freewill and determinism; the nature and sources of knowledge; and the justification of scientific beliefs. Details...
College Preparatory Physics I is designed to provide students with the equivalent of ABE Advanced Level Physics or Grade 11 Physics. The content of the course includes: measurement, kinematics in one dimension, dynamics in one dimension, Newton's laws, friction,gravitation, kinetic and potential energy,momentum, heat, wave phenomena and optics, and electricity. Details...
Introduction to Physics I and II are first year algebra-based courses. They are designed for those students that have a relatively weak background in physics. PHY 100 includes vectors, and scalars, kinematics, dynamics, energy, momentum, rotational motion, thermodynamics, fluids and wave motion. Laboratory work illustrates theoretical concepts and develops laboratory skills and techniques. Details...
Principles of Physics I and II are first year university level (calculus based) foundation courses in physics designed as essential prerequisites to further courses in the physical sciences. PHY 120 includes statics, kinematics and dynamics of particles and rigid bodies; conservation of energy and momentum; vibration, waves, and sound; heat and thermodynamics. This course includes extensive laboratory work intended to illustrate theoretical concepts and to develop laboratory skills. Details...
PSY 204 provides an introduction to basic research techniques in psychology; emphasis on the conceptual rather than the statistical rationale underlying various research strategies. Areas include the nature of variables, types of measurement, how to generate and test hypotheses, types of validity, and how to interpret and report results. Laboratory exercises and class demonstrations on the processes involved in conducting empirical research. Research process (theory, models, hypotheses, predictions); research ethics; experimental methods; non-experimental methods; validity; reliability; sampling; descriptive statistics; central tendency; variability; inferential statistics; and experimental design. Details...

Winter 2020

This course is an introduction to the sub-fields of anthropology: physical anthropology and archaeology. Through readings and audio-visual material, the origins and development of humans and their cultures are explored, including the development of the civilizations of the Old and New World. Details...
This course surveys the methods and theoretical conceptions which archaeologists use to interpret world prehistory using selected sites from throughout the world. Weather permitting, location and excavation of a contemporary site may be attempted. Details...
College Preparatory Chemistry II is designed to provide students with the equivalent of Grade 12 Chemistry. The content of the course includes: gas laws, thermochemistry, reaction rates, chemical equilibrium, acids and bases, redox reactions and electrochemistry. Details...
An introduction to the structure and operation of the Canadian criminal justice system, including the police, courts, and corrections. Analysis of the patterns of crime and victimization, police discretion and decision-making; criminal sentencing; correctional institutions and community-based models; and the youth justice system. Patterns of contact and conflict between various social groups and the criminal justice system are also examined. Details...
This course is designed to prepare students for the administration and supervisory responsibilities in an early childhood care and education facility. In addition to an overview of broad concepts and principles related to administration, specific roles and responsibilities of the administrator will be addressed. Discussion of current trends and issues within the ECCE profession will be included. Details...
Through the study of oral and written texts by Indigenous authors, First Peoples Literature and Composition develops critical thinking skills, reading skills, speaking skills, and writing skills to prepare students for the demands of either the workplace, college programs, or university-level courses. Students will write several essays, deliver oral presentations, and complete a research essay or assignment at the conclusion of the course. Students will also explore elements of First People history and culture through the readings and assignments in the course. Credit will only be granted for either ENG 096 or ENG 098. Details...
English 098 is designed to prepare students for the reading, writing, and critical thinking demands they will encounter in the workplace, college programs or university-level courses. The course assists students to develop reading, research and reference skills and write a range of technical, professional and academic assignments. They will also apply critical thinking skills to situations ranging from problem solving to media literacy. This course satisfies the requirements for English in the ABE Provincial Level Diploma Program. Credit will only be granted for either ENG 096 or ENG 098. Details...
English 225 is a survey of literature written in English by women from the early 20th century to the present. The course will focus on works in a variety of genres, including poetry, short and long fiction, and non-fiction, on the history of modern women's writing, and how the female voice has helped to shape the modern English literary tradition. Details...
GEO 112 critically examines the complex relations between people and places through key themes and concepts in the cultural, urban and economic fields of human geography. Topics to be studied include: local and popular cultures and landscapes, disappearing peoples, concepts of nature, the agricultural revolutions, global agricultural restructuring, agribusiness, food security, urban and suburban processes, development issues in the less developed world, barriers to and the costs of economic development, globalization, deindustrialization, and social change in the world system. Details...
This course combines an introduction to the religions of Asia with comparative analysis of some key organizing themes for the study of all world religions. It examines the origins and historical development, the sacred texts, the central tenets, the institutions and rituals of Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism, Confucianism, Taoism and Shinto. It also explores selected core concepts such as sacred space, sacred time, sacred rituals and sacred symbols in a comparative context that uses not only these seven eastern religions but also the Abrahamic tradition and other world religions as reference points. Instruction will combine intensive reading, seminar discussion and lecture presentations. Details...
This course combines an introduction to the religions of Asia with comparative analysis of some key organizing themes for the study of all world religions. It examines the origins and historical development, the sacred texts, the central tenets, the institutions and rituals of Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism, Confucianism, Taoism and Shinto. It also explores selected core concepts such as sacred space, sacred time, sacred rituals and sacred symbols in a comparative context that uses not only these seven eastern religions but also the Abrahamic tradition and other world religions as reference points. Instruction will combine intensive reading, seminar discussion and lecture presentations. Details...
Foundations of Mathematics includes rates, systems of linear equations, quadratic functions, geometry, statistics, trigonometry, measurement, and logical reasoning. Details...
This course covers linear systems and Gauss-Jordan elimination, geometric linear programming, matrices and matrix operations, symbolic logic, set theory, permutations and combinations, discrete probability, including conditional probability and Bayes' formula, random variables and their distributions, expectation, Markov chains. Details...
This course covers: a review of the Fundamental Theorem and area; methods of integration - substitution, integration by parts, trigonometric integrals, trigonometric substitution, partial fractions, and trapezoidal rule; introduction to differential equations; applications of integration - volume, arc length; L'Hospital's rule and improper integrals; infinite sequences and series, tests of convergence for infinite series, Taylor polynomials and series, and applications. Students will use a computer algebra system in the lab to improve their conceptual understanding, aid visualization, and to solve problems. Details...
This course covers: a review of the Fundamental Theorem and area; methods of integration - substitution, integration by parts, trigonometric integrals, trigonometric substitution, partial fractions, and trapezoidal rule; introduction to differential equations; applications of integration - volume, arc length; L'Hospital's rule and improper integrals; infinite sequences and series, tests of convergence for infinite series, Taylor polynomials and series, and applications. Students will use a computer algebra system in the lab to improve their conceptual understanding, aid visualization, and to solve problems. Details...
College Preparatory Physics II is designed to provide students with the equivalent of ABE Provincial Level Physics or Grade 12 Physics. The course includes vectors using trigonometry, kinematics in one and two dimensions, energy and momentum, statics and dynamics, rotational dynamics, vibrations and waves, electromagnetism, and geometric optics. Details...
This is the second of the Introduction to Physics courses. PHY 101 includes light and optics, electricity and magnetism, and special relativity. Laboratory work is used to reinforce theoretical concepts and develop laboratory skills and concepts. Details...
Principles of Physics I and II are first year university level (calculus based) foundation courses in physics designed as essential prerequisites to further courses in the physical sciences. PHY 121 includes electricity and magnetism, light, optics and modern physics. This course includes extensive laboratory work intended to illustrate theoretical concepts and to develop laboratory skills. Details...
This course is an introduction to engineering mechanics for students planning to transfer into a University engineering program. The course introduces a methodology for analysis of forces and moments acting on, or within, rigid bodies, structures and machines that are in static equilibrium. Topics include conditions of equilibrium and applications to particles and rigid bodies; analysis of structures, including beams, trusses and arches; bending moment and shear force diagrams for beams; dry friction. Details...
This course is an introduction to engineering mechanics for students planning to transfer into a University engineering program. The course introduces a methodology for analysis of forces and moments acting on, or within, rigid bodies, structures and machines that are in static equilibrium. Topics include conditions of equilibrium and applications to particles and rigid bodies; analysis of structures, including beams, trusses and arches; bending moment and shear force diagrams for beams; dry friction. Details...
This course introduces the basic concepts and techniques of descriptive and inferential statistics. It is designed to help students develop a working knowledge of statistics, as well as an awareness of the practical applications of statistics in diverse fields such as the biological and social sciences and business. Topics include: descriptive statistics, bivariate analysis, data collection, probability, random variables, sampling distribution of a statistic, estimation of a parameter and tests of hypotheses for one population, estimation and tests of hypotheses for two or more populations. Students will use statistics software to perform basic statistical data analysis. Details...

Winter 2019

Examining case studies and examples of successful community development models, students will gain the skills and knowledge required to contribute to current and future community growth. Students will explore current trends toward community growth and stability within the context of nation building. Details...

Spring 2019

English 098 is designed to prepare students for the reading, writing, and critical thinking demands they will encounter in either the workplace, college programs or university-level courses. The course assists students to develop reading, research and reference skills and write effective sentences, paragraphs, and a variety of essays. A research essay or a research assignment will also be produced. They will also apply critical thinking skills to situations ranging from problem solving to media literacy. This course satisfies the requirements for English in the ABE Provincial Level Diploma Program. Credit will only be granted for either ENG 096 or ENG 098. Details...
This course provides a general chronological overview of Canadian history in the pre-Confederation era. It introduces some of the major political, social and economic events that shaped early Canadian development. Details...
Foundations of Mathematics includes rates, systems of linear equations, quadratic functions, geometry, statistics, trigonometry, measurement, and logical reasoning. Details...
This course introduces the basic concepts and techniques of descriptive and inferential statistics. It is designed to help students develop a working knowledge of statistics, as well as an awareness of the practical applications of statistics in diverse fields such as the biological and social sciences and business. Topics include: descriptive statistics, data collection, probability theory, probability distributions, sampling distribution of a statistic, estimation of a parameter and test of hypotheses for one population, estimation and test of hypotheses for two or more populations, and bivariate analysis. Details...
This course will examine concepts of Aboriginal health and healing using Aboriginal processes and ways of knowing for curriculum construction and delivery. It will include pre and post assignments and 5 consecutive days learning in an Aboriginal Community within the college region. Students will explore the Aboriginal world view of health and wellness and will examine the historical and contemporary significance of health issues for Aboriginal communities through interaction with local elders and community representatives. This course will also examine the nurse's role with individuals, families and communities from social justice and cultural safety perspectives. Participants will have the opportunity to explore their own relational practice through reflection on their own ethnocentricities and personal meanings and through active engagement with Aboriginal community members and processes. Details...
This course will examine concepts of Aboriginal health and healing using Aboriginal processes and ways of knowing for curriculum construction and delivery. It will include pre and post assignments and 5 consecutive days learning in an Aboriginal Community within the college region. Students will explore the Aboriginal world view of health and wellness and will examine the historical and contemporary significance of health issues for Aboriginal communities through interaction with local elders and community representatives. This course will also examine the nurse's role with individuals, families and communities from social justice and cultural safety perspectives. Participants will have the opportunity to explore their own relational practice through reflection on their own ethnocentricities and personal meanings and through active engagement with Aboriginal community members and processes. Details...
An examination of ethical issues arising in the contemporary business context. A number of classical ethical theories are introduced and applied to a variety of concrete problems such as whistle-blowing, product safety, employee rights, discrimination, international business, the environment, and investing. Emphasis is on mastery of the key ethical concepts and their application to real-life situations. Details...
This course provides an overview of child development up to, but not including adolescence. The impact of genetics and environment, major theories of human development, methods for studying child development, cultural diversity, and development in the physical, cognitive, emotional and social spheres are included. Details...

Fall 2019

The purpose of this course is to assist students in developing tools for planning and implementing economic development initiatives that align with their respective community's short, mid and long term economic goals and visions. Topics include an introduction to relevant economic concepts and resources available to support strategic planning for economic development in Aboriginal Communities. Details...
In this course students will gain an understanding of the fundamental human resources theories and practices necessary to create value and direction in Aboriginal organizations. Students will analyze and balance strategic leadership practices, grounded in traditional practices, with an understanding of how Western human resources laws, systems and practices are used within Aboriginal organizations. Details...
This course strengthens students' core skills, knowledge and understanding of systems used in the financial management of various types of contemporary Aboriginal organizations. This includes understanding the unique, historic fiduciary obligations and responsibilities of Canadian governments to Aboriginal peoples. Details...
An examination of traditional and post-contact aboriginal societies using a culture area approach. This background will lead to consideration of the status of Aboriginal People in contemporary Canadian Society. Details...
An introduction to the core concepts, basic data sources, and general research findings in the field of Criminology. A key focus is on elements of continuity and discontinuity between traditional and contemporary theories of crime, deviance, criminality, and social control. Particular attention is paid to the Canadian context. Details...
An introduction to the fundamental principles or jurisprudence and the basic legal institutions of Canada. An examination of the history of Canadian law, the development of the Canadian constitution, the system of Canadian courts, and the roles and responsibilities of members of the legal profession. In addition, an analysis of the nature of legal reasoning, the doctrine of precedent, and the principles of statutory interpretation. Also introduces the fields of contract, torts, administrative law, and family law. Details...
This course will expand on the foundational knowledge, skills and values discussed in Part II with more emphasis on application of both guiding and caring and working effectively as part of a team with colleagues, families and community. This will include looking at more challenging behaviours and how to use observation and creative problem solving as part of a team to plan effective intervention. Students will take a closer look at what it means to include families in a meaningful way. Details...
This pre-employment course prepares students for success in identifying, securing and keeping work that is related to their long-term career goals. This is a highly interactive seminar in which students will learn about the principles of transferring skills and knowledge from the academic environment to the practical work environment. Topics include: self-assessment of employability skills, values and attitudes, resume writing, interview practice, skill transfer theory, work search techniques, goal setting, and workplace success skills. In addition to the classroom component, students meet individually on a regular basis with Co-operative Education faculty and staff to work towards their short and long term employment goals. Students mustcomplete this course in the Fall term as a prerequisite to Co-operative Education Internship Work Term THM-197 or BUS 197 in the spring. Details...
This pre-employment course prepares students for success in identifying, securing and keeping work that is related to their long-term career goals. This is a highly interactive seminar in which students will learn about the principles of transferring skills and knowledge from the academic environment to the practical work environment. Topics include: self-assessment of employability skills, values and attitudes, resume writing, interview practice, skill transfer theory, work search techniques, goal setting, and workplace success skills. In addition to the classroom component, students meet individually on a regular basis with Co-operative Education faculty and staff to work towards their short and long term employment goals. Students mustcomplete this course in the Fall term as a prerequisite to Co-operative Education Internship Work Term THM-197 or BUS 197 in the spring. Details...
This course is an introduction to university-level research and writing in the humanities and social sciences and/or natural sciences. It is designed to help students acquire the research skills and understand the writing practices used by scholars in a variety of academic disciplines. As a way of focusing discussion, students will examine different disciplinary approaches to a single research topic. Note: Credit will only be granted for ENG 115 or ENG 117 or ENG 125. Details...
For 2019 Fall, the topic is narrative and digital media. This course introduces the function of narrative and examines narrative method in a variety of genres such as poetry, fiction, drama, biography, autobiography, essay, film, and textbook. The focus of study will vary according to instructor interest and may include themes such as love and sex, war, crime, death, family, or social justice. Students will be introduced to narratology and will examine the ways in which narrative structures shape understanding of the self and the world. Details...
This course focuses on the complex relationships between people and the environment. It provides an introduction to how the biosphere functions, examines the impacts of human activities and resource exploitation on the environment, and considers the potential for a sustainable society. Topics covered include; energy flow, biogeochemical cycles, ecosystem structure and dynamics, climate change, water resources, marine resources, biodiversity loss, protected areas and endangered species, human population growth, ecological footprint analysis, and environmental world-views. Details...
This course surveys the world of early modern Europe from the flowering of the Renaissance in Italy and northern Europe, through the age of the religious wars in the seventeenth century, the eighteenth century Age of Enlightenment, and developments in eastern Europe and Russia, culminating in the great watershed of the French Revolution. In addition to covering military and political developments, the course also describes the changes wrought in the social and economic lives of the people of the emerging nation states of Europe. Details...
This course is designed as an introduction to the world's major religions, with an emphasis upon those of the Abrahamic tradition: Judaism, Islam and Christianity. It combines an intensive focus upon individual living faiths with study of the different scholarly approaches to understanding religion. Instruction will combine intensive reading, seminar discussion and lecture presentations. Students who have previously earned credit in NIC's HIS 130 are not eligible for credit in LIB 130. Details...
This course is designed as an introduction to the world's major religions, with an emphasis upon those of the Abrahamic tradition: Judaism, Islam and Christianity. It combines an intensive focus upon individual living faiths with study of the different scholarly approaches to understanding religion. Instruction will combine intensive reading, seminar discussion and lecture presentations. Students who have previously earned credit in NIC's HIS 130 are not eligible for credit in LIB 130. Details...
This course covers calculus of one variable with applications to the life sciences. The content includes limits, differentiation of polynomial, rational, radical, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions; applications of differentiation - graphing and optimization problems; exponential growth and decay; integration and areas - techniques, exponential models; Taylor polynomials; introduction to differential equations. Details...
MAT 133 is an introduction to matrix algebra. It is a required course for students planning to transfer into a University engineering program. Topics include complex numbers, systems of linear equations, matrix operations, determinants, linear transformations, independence, eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Credit will normally be granted for only one of MAT 133 or MAT 200. Details...
MAT 133 is an introduction to matrix algebra. It is a required course for students planning to transfer into a University engineering program. Topics include complex numbers, systems of linear equations, matrix operations, determinants, linear transformations, independence, eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Credit will normally be granted for only one of MAT 133 or MAT 200. Details...
Calculus I and II together comprise a 1st-year course in calculus. MAT 181 - Differential calculus of both algebraic and transcendental functions. Topics include: limits and continuity, the derivative - definition, rules, implicit differentiation; applications - curve sketching, maximum-minimum and related rates problems; differentials; antiderivatives. Students will learn how to use a computer algebra system in the lab to enhance their understanding of calculus concepts. Details...
Calculus I and II together comprise a 1st-year course in calculus. MAT 181 - Differential calculus of both algebraic and transcendental functions. Topics include: limits and continuity, the derivative - definition, rules, implicit differentiation; applications - curve sketching, maximum-minimum and related rates problems; differentials; antiderivatives. Students will learn how to use a computer algebra system in the lab to enhance their understanding of calculus concepts. Details...
An introduction to selected problems in the philosophy of religion, metaphysics (theory of reality), and epistemology (theory of knowledge). Topics include the existence of God; the nature of mind and its relation to body; computers and consciousness; personal identity and mortality; freewill and determinism; the nature and sources of knowledge; and the justification of scientific beliefs. Details...
Introduction to Physics I and II are first year algebra-based courses. They are designed for those students that have a relatively weak background in physics. PHY 100 includes vectors, and scalars, kinematics, dynamics, energy, momentum, rotational motion, thermodynamics, fluids and wave motion. Laboratory work illustrates theoretical concepts and develops laboratory skills and techniques. Details...
Principles of Physics I and II are first year university level (calculus based) foundation courses in physics designed as essential prerequisites to further courses in the physical sciences. PHY 120 includes statics, kinematics and dynamics of particles and rigid bodies; conservation of energy and momentum; vibration, waves, and sound; heat and thermodynamics. This course includes extensive laboratory work intended to illustrate theoretical concepts and to develop laboratory skills. Details...
PSY 204 provides an introduction to basic research techniques in psychology; emphasis on the conceptual rather than the statistical rationale underlying various research strategies. Areas include the nature of variables, types of measurement, how to generate and test hypotheses, types of validity, and how to interpret and report results. Laboratory exercises and class demonstrations on the processes involved in conducting empirical research. Research process (theory, models, hypotheses, predictions); research ethics; experimental methods; non-experimental methods; validity; reliability; sampling; descriptive statistics; central tendency; variability; inferential statistics; and experimental design. Details...

Winter 2020

This course surveys the methods and theoretical conceptions which archaeologists use to interpret world prehistory using selected sites from throughout the world. Weather permitting, location and excavation of a contemporary site may be attempted. Details...
An introduction to the structure and operation of the Canadian criminal justice system, including the police, courts, and corrections. Analysis of the patterns of crime and victimization, police discretion and decision-making; criminal sentencing; correctional institutions and community-based models; and the youth justice system. Patterns of contact and conflict between various social groups and the criminal justice system are also examined. Details...
This course is designed to prepare students for the administration and supervisory responsibilities in an early childhood care and education facility. In addition to an overview of broad concepts and principles related to administration, specific roles and responsibilities of the administrator will be addressed. Discussion of current trends and issues within the ECCE profession will be included. Details...
English 098 is designed to prepare students for the reading, writing, and critical thinking demands they will encounter in the workplace, college programs or university-level courses. The course assists students to develop reading, research and reference skills and write a range of technical, professional and academic assignments. They will also apply critical thinking skills to situations ranging from problem solving to media literacy. This course satisfies the requirements for English in the ABE Provincial Level Diploma Program. Credit will only be granted for either ENG 096 or ENG 098. Details...
This course is an introduction to university-level research and writing in the humanities and social sciences and/or natural sciences. It is designed to help students acquire the research skills and understand the writing practices used by scholars in a variety of academic disciplines. As a way of focusing discussion, students will examine different disciplinary approaches to a single research topic. Note: Credit will only be granted for ENG 115 or ENG 117 or ENG 125. Details...
This course combines an intensive survey of contemporarty and historical travel writing with a study and practice of creative writing in fiction and non-fiction genres. The focus will be on the learning of the craft and writing through discussion, exercises and peer critiquing and when possible, travel. Details...
English 225 is a survey of literature written in English by women from the early 20th century to the present. The course will focus on works in a variety of genres, including poetry, short and long fiction, and non-fiction, on the history of modern women's writing, and how the female voice has helped to shape the modern English literary tradition. Details...
GEO 112 critically examines the complex relations between people and places through key themes and concepts in the cultural, urban and economic fields of human geography. Topics to be studied include: local and popular cultures and landscapes, disappearing peoples, concepts of nature, the agricultural revolutions, global agricultural restructuring, agribusiness, food security, urban and suburban processes, development issues in the less developed world, barriers to and the costs of economic development, globalization, deindustrialization, and social change in the world system. Details...
This course combines an introduction to the religions of Asia with comparative analysis of some key organizing themes for the study of all world religions. It examines the origins and historical development, the sacred texts, the central tenets, the institutions and rituals of Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism, Confucianism, Taoism and Shinto. It also explores selected core concepts such as sacred space, sacred time, sacred rituals and sacred symbols in a comparative context that uses not only these seven eastern religions but also the Abrahamic tradition and other world religions as reference points. Instruction will combine intensive reading, seminar discussion and lecture presentations. Details...
This course combines an introduction to the religions of Asia with comparative analysis of some key organizing themes for the study of all world religions. It examines the origins and historical development, the sacred texts, the central tenets, the institutions and rituals of Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism, Confucianism, Taoism and Shinto. It also explores selected core concepts such as sacred space, sacred time, sacred rituals and sacred symbols in a comparative context that uses not only these seven eastern religions but also the Abrahamic tradition and other world religions as reference points. Instruction will combine intensive reading, seminar discussion and lecture presentations. Details...
This course covers linear systems and Gauss-Jordan elimination, geometric linear programming, matrices and matrix operations, symbolic logic, set theory, permutations and combinations, discrete probability, including conditional probability and Bayes' formula, random variables and their distributions, expectation, Markov chains. Details...
This course covers: a review of the Fundamental Theorem and area; methods of integration - substitution, integration by parts, trigonometric integrals, trigonometric substitution, partial fractions, and trapezoidal rule; introduction to differential equations; applications of integration - volume, arc length; L'Hospital's rule and improper integrals; infinite sequences and series, tests of convergence for infinite series, Taylor polynomials and series, and applications. Students will use a computer algebra system in the lab to improve their conceptual understanding, aid visualization, and to solve problems. Details...
This course covers: a review of the Fundamental Theorem and area; methods of integration - substitution, integration by parts, trigonometric integrals, trigonometric substitution, partial fractions, and trapezoidal rule; introduction to differential equations; applications of integration - volume, arc length; L'Hospital's rule and improper integrals; infinite sequences and series, tests of convergence for infinite series, Taylor polynomials and series, and applications. Students will use a computer algebra system in the lab to improve their conceptual understanding, aid visualization, and to solve problems. Details...
This is the second of the Introduction to Physics courses. PHY 101 includes light and optics, electricity and magnetism, and special relativity. Laboratory work is used to reinforce theoretical concepts and develop laboratory skills and concepts. Details...
Principles of Physics I and II are first year university level (calculus based) foundation courses in physics designed as essential prerequisites to further courses in the physical sciences. PHY 121 includes electricity and magnetism, light, optics and modern physics. This course includes extensive laboratory work intended to illustrate theoretical concepts and to develop laboratory skills. Details...
This course is an introduction to engineering mechanics for students planning to transfer into a University engineering program. The course introduces a methodology for analysis of forces and moments acting on, or within, rigid bodies, structures and machines that are in static equilibrium. Topics include conditions of equilibrium and applications to particles and rigid bodies; analysis of structures, including beams, trusses and arches; bending moment and shear force diagrams for beams; dry friction. Details...
This course is an introduction to engineering mechanics for students planning to transfer into a University engineering program. The course introduces a methodology for analysis of forces and moments acting on, or within, rigid bodies, structures and machines that are in static equilibrium. Topics include conditions of equilibrium and applications to particles and rigid bodies; analysis of structures, including beams, trusses and arches; bending moment and shear force diagrams for beams; dry friction. Details...
This course is an introduction to engineering mechanics for students planning to transfer into engineering at UBC. Students will study the statics, kinematics and dynamics of particles and rigid bodies. They will apply vector analysis to three-dimensional static-equilibrium problems, and differential and integral calculus to dynamics problems, as well as make use of Newton's laws and the concepts of impulse, momentum, work and energy. Students will focus on the analysis of practical mechanics problems in two and three dimensions. Details...
This course is an introduction to engineering mechanics for students planning to transfer into engineering at UBC. Students will study the statics, kinematics and dynamics of particles and rigid bodies. They will apply vector analysis to three-dimensional static-equilibrium problems, and differential and integral calculus to dynamics problems, as well as make use of Newton's laws and the concepts of impulse, momentum, work and energy. Students will focus on the analysis of practical mechanics problems in two and three dimensions. Details...

Spring 2019

English 098 is designed to prepare students for the reading, writing, and critical thinking demands they will encounter in either the workplace, college programs or university-level courses. The course assists students to develop reading, research and reference skills and write effective sentences, paragraphs, and a variety of essays. A research essay or a research assignment will also be produced. They will also apply critical thinking skills to situations ranging from problem solving to media literacy. This course satisfies the requirements for English in the ABE Provincial Level Diploma Program. Credit will only be granted for either ENG 096 or ENG 098. Details...
English 127 introduces students to Indigenous literatures in Canada with emphasis on their historical, political, and cultural contexts. Students will study works selected from various genres, including story-telling, both oral and written, non-fiction writing, novels, short stories, drama, and poetry, as well as art, film, and digital media. They will learn to write reflective and scholarly analysis by interweaving Indigenous and Western approaches to textual interpretation and literary criticism. Students may not receive credit for ENG 127 if they have previously completed ENG 120, ENG 121 or ENG 126. Details...
English 127 introduces students to Indigenous literatures in Canada with emphasis on their historical, political, and cultural contexts. Students will study works selected from various genres, including story-telling, both oral and written, non-fiction writing, novels, short stories, drama, and poetry, as well as art, film, and digital media. They will learn to write reflective and scholarly analysis by interweaving Indigenous and Western approaches to textual interpretation and literary criticism. Students may not receive credit for ENG 127 if they have previously completed ENG 120, ENG 121 or ENG 126. Details...
This course provides a general chronological overview of Canadian history in the pre-Confederation era. It introduces some of the major political, social and economic events that shaped early Canadian development. Details...
Foundations of Mathematics includes rates, systems of linear equations, quadratic functions, geometry, statistics, trigonometry, measurement, and logical reasoning. Details...
This course introduces the basic concepts and techniques of descriptive and inferential statistics. It is designed to help students develop a working knowledge of statistics, as well as an awareness of the practical applications of statistics in diverse fields such as the biological and social sciences and business. Topics include: descriptive statistics, data collection, probability theory, probability distributions, sampling distribution of a statistic, estimation of a parameter and test of hypotheses for one population, estimation and test of hypotheses for two or more populations, and bivariate analysis. Details...

Fall 2019

This audio-visual course focuses on the cross-cultural study of human diversity. Topics include patterns of subsistence, linguistics, social, political and economic organization, religion, aesthetics, and the future of humanity. Details...
An examination of traditional and post-contact aboriginal societies using a culture area approach. This background will lead to consideration of the status of Aboriginal People in contemporary Canadian Society. Details...
This course provides students with a broad range of basic business skills. Topics include business plan development, legal issues of business start-up and management, financing, marketing, and basic record keeping for a small business venture. Details...
College Preparatory Chemistry I is designed to provide students with the equivalent of Grade 11 Chemistry. The content of the course includes: nature of matter, mole concept, chemical reactions, atomic theory, solution chemistry and organic chemistry. Details...
An introduction to the core concepts, basic data sources, and general research findings in the field of Criminology. A key focus is on elements of continuity and discontinuity between traditional and contemporary theories of crime, deviance, criminality, and social control. Particular attention is paid to the Canadian context. Details...
An introduction to the fundamental principles or jurisprudence and the basic legal institutions of Canada. An examination of the history of Canadian law, the development of the Canadian constitution, the system of Canadian courts, and the roles and responsibilities of members of the legal profession. In addition, an analysis of the nature of legal reasoning, the doctrine of precedent, and the principles of statutory interpretation. Also introduces the fields of contract, torts, administrative law, and family law. Details...
This course will expand on the foundational knowledge, skills and values discussed in Part II with more emphasis on application of both guiding and caring and working effectively as part of a team with colleagues, families and community. This will include looking at more challenging behaviours and how to use observation and creative problem solving as part of a team to plan effective intervention. Students will take a closer look at what it means to include families in a meaningful way. Details...
English 098 is designed to prepare students for the reading, writing, and critical thinking demands they will encounter in the workplace, college programs or university-level courses. The course assists students to develop reading, research and reference skills and write a range of technical, professional and academic assignments. They will also apply critical thinking skills to situations ranging from problem solving to media literacy. This course satisfies the requirements for English in the ABE Provincial Level Diploma Program. Credit will only be granted for either ENG 096 or ENG 098. Details...
For 2019 Fall, the topic is narrative and digital media. This course introduces the function of narrative and examines narrative method in a variety of genres such as poetry, fiction, drama, biography, autobiography, essay, film, and textbook. The focus of study will vary according to instructor interest and may include themes such as love and sex, war, crime, death, family, or social justice. Students will be introduced to narratology and will examine the ways in which narrative structures shape understanding of the self and the world. Details...
This course focuses on the complex relationships between people and the environment. It provides an introduction to how the biosphere functions, examines the impacts of human activities and resource exploitation on the environment, and considers the potential for a sustainable society. Topics covered include; energy flow, biogeochemical cycles, ecosystem structure and dynamics, climate change, water resources, marine resources, biodiversity loss, protected areas and endangered species, human population growth, ecological footprint analysis, and environmental world-views. Details...
This course surveys the world of early modern Europe from the flowering of the Renaissance in Italy and northern Europe, through the age of the religious wars in the seventeenth century, the eighteenth century Age of Enlightenment, and developments in eastern Europe and Russia, culminating in the great watershed of the French Revolution. In addition to covering military and political developments, the course also describes the changes wrought in the social and economic lives of the people of the emerging nation states of Europe. Details...
This course is designed as an introduction to the world's major religions, with an emphasis upon those of the Abrahamic tradition: Judaism, Islam and Christianity. It combines an intensive focus upon individual living faiths with study of the different scholarly approaches to understanding religion. Instruction will combine intensive reading, seminar discussion and lecture presentations. Students who have previously earned credit in NIC's HIS 130 are not eligible for credit in LIB 130. Details...
This course is designed as an introduction to the world's major religions, with an emphasis upon those of the Abrahamic tradition: Judaism, Islam and Christianity. It combines an intensive focus upon individual living faiths with study of the different scholarly approaches to understanding religion. Instruction will combine intensive reading, seminar discussion and lecture presentations. Students who have previously earned credit in NIC's HIS 130 are not eligible for credit in LIB 130. Details...
Foundations of Mathematics includes rates, systems of linear equations, quadratic functions, geometry, statistics, trigonometry, measurement, and logical reasoning. Details...
This course covers calculus of one variable with applications to the life sciences. The content includes limits, differentiation of polynomial, rational, radical, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions; applications of differentiation - graphing and optimization problems; exponential growth and decay; integration and areas - techniques, exponential models; Taylor polynomials; introduction to differential equations. Details...
MAT 133 is an introduction to matrix algebra. It is a required course for students planning to transfer into a University engineering program. Topics include complex numbers, systems of linear equations, matrix operations, determinants, linear transformations, independence, eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Credit will normally be granted for only one of MAT 133 or MAT 200. Details...
MAT 133 is an introduction to matrix algebra. It is a required course for students planning to transfer into a University engineering program. Topics include complex numbers, systems of linear equations, matrix operations, determinants, linear transformations, independence, eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Credit will normally be granted for only one of MAT 133 or MAT 200. Details...
Calculus I and II together comprise a 1st-year course in calculus. MAT 181 - Differential calculus of both algebraic and transcendental functions. Topics include: limits and continuity, the derivative - definition, rules, implicit differentiation; applications - curve sketching, maximum-minimum and related rates problems; differentials; antiderivatives. Students will learn how to use a computer algebra system in the lab to enhance their understanding of calculus concepts. Details...
Calculus I and II together comprise a 1st-year course in calculus. MAT 181 - Differential calculus of both algebraic and transcendental functions. Topics include: limits and continuity, the derivative - definition, rules, implicit differentiation; applications - curve sketching, maximum-minimum and related rates problems; differentials; antiderivatives. Students will learn how to use a computer algebra system in the lab to enhance their understanding of calculus concepts. Details...
An introduction to selected problems in the philosophy of religion, metaphysics (theory of reality), and epistemology (theory of knowledge). Topics include the existence of God; the nature of mind and its relation to body; computers and consciousness; personal identity and mortality; freewill and determinism; the nature and sources of knowledge; and the justification of scientific beliefs. Details...
College Preparatory Physics I is designed to provide students with the equivalent of ABE Advanced Level Physics or Grade 11 Physics. The content of the course includes: measurement, kinematics in one dimension, dynamics in one dimension, Newton's laws, friction,gravitation, kinetic and potential energy,momentum, heat, wave phenomena and optics, and electricity. Details...
Introduction to Physics I and II are first year algebra-based courses. They are designed for those students that have a relatively weak background in physics. PHY 100 includes vectors, and scalars, kinematics, dynamics, energy, momentum, rotational motion, thermodynamics, fluids and wave motion. Laboratory work illustrates theoretical concepts and develops laboratory skills and techniques. Details...
Principles of Physics I and II are first year university level (calculus based) foundation courses in physics designed as essential prerequisites to further courses in the physical sciences. PHY 120 includes statics, kinematics and dynamics of particles and rigid bodies; conservation of energy and momentum; vibration, waves, and sound; heat and thermodynamics. This course includes extensive laboratory work intended to illustrate theoretical concepts and to develop laboratory skills. Details...
PSY 204 provides an introduction to basic research techniques in psychology; emphasis on the conceptual rather than the statistical rationale underlying various research strategies. Areas include the nature of variables, types of measurement, how to generate and test hypotheses, types of validity, and how to interpret and report results. Laboratory exercises and class demonstrations on the processes involved in conducting empirical research. Research process (theory, models, hypotheses, predictions); research ethics; experimental methods; non-experimental methods; validity; reliability; sampling; descriptive statistics; central tendency; variability; inferential statistics; and experimental design. Details...

Winter 2020

This course is an introduction to the sub-fields of anthropology: physical anthropology and archaeology. Through readings and audio-visual material, the origins and development of humans and their cultures are explored, including the development of the civilizations of the Old and New World. Details...
This course surveys the methods and theoretical conceptions which archaeologists use to interpret world prehistory using selected sites from throughout the world. Weather permitting, location and excavation of a contemporary site may be attempted. Details...
College Preparatory Chemistry II is designed to provide students with the equivalent of Grade 12 Chemistry. The content of the course includes: gas laws, thermochemistry, reaction rates, chemical equilibrium, acids and bases, redox reactions and electrochemistry. Details...
An introduction to the structure and operation of the Canadian criminal justice system, including the police, courts, and corrections. Analysis of the patterns of crime and victimization, police discretion and decision-making; criminal sentencing; correctional institutions and community-based models; and the youth justice system. Patterns of contact and conflict between various social groups and the criminal justice system are also examined. Details...
This course is designed to prepare students for the administration and supervisory responsibilities in an early childhood care and education facility. In addition to an overview of broad concepts and principles related to administration, specific roles and responsibilities of the administrator will be addressed. Discussion of current trends and issues within the ECCE profession will be included. Details...
Through the study of oral and written texts by Indigenous authors, First Peoples Literature and Composition develops critical thinking skills, reading skills, speaking skills, and writing skills to prepare students for the demands of either the workplace, college programs, or university-level courses. Students will write several essays, deliver oral presentations, and complete a research essay or assignment at the conclusion of the course. Students will also explore elements of First People history and culture through the readings and assignments in the course. Credit will only be granted for either ENG 096 or ENG 098. Details...
English 098 is designed to prepare students for the reading, writing, and critical thinking demands they will encounter in the workplace, college programs or university-level courses. The course assists students to develop reading, research and reference skills and write a range of technical, professional and academic assignments. They will also apply critical thinking skills to situations ranging from problem solving to media literacy. This course satisfies the requirements for English in the ABE Provincial Level Diploma Program. Credit will only be granted for either ENG 096 or ENG 098. Details...
English 225 is a survey of literature written in English by women from the early 20th century to the present. The course will focus on works in a variety of genres, including poetry, short and long fiction, and non-fiction, on the history of modern women's writing, and how the female voice has helped to shape the modern English literary tradition. Details...
GEO 112 critically examines the complex relations between people and places through key themes and concepts in the cultural, urban and economic fields of human geography. Topics to be studied include: local and popular cultures and landscapes, disappearing peoples, concepts of nature, the agricultural revolutions, global agricultural restructuring, agribusiness, food security, urban and suburban processes, development issues in the less developed world, barriers to and the costs of economic development, globalization, deindustrialization, and social change in the world system. Details...
This course combines an introduction to the religions of Asia with comparative analysis of some key organizing themes for the study of all world religions. It examines the origins and historical development, the sacred texts, the central tenets, the institutions and rituals of Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism, Confucianism, Taoism and Shinto. It also explores selected core concepts such as sacred space, sacred time, sacred rituals and sacred symbols in a comparative context that uses not only these seven eastern religions but also the Abrahamic tradition and other world religions as reference points. Instruction will combine intensive reading, seminar discussion and lecture presentations. Details...
This course combines an introduction to the religions of Asia with comparative analysis of some key organizing themes for the study of all world religions. It examines the origins and historical development, the sacred texts, the central tenets, the institutions and rituals of Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism, Confucianism, Taoism and Shinto. It also explores selected core concepts such as sacred space, sacred time, sacred rituals and sacred symbols in a comparative context that uses not only these seven eastern religions but also the Abrahamic tradition and other world religions as reference points. Instruction will combine intensive reading, seminar discussion and lecture presentations. Details...
Foundations of Mathematics includes rates, systems of linear equations, quadratic functions, geometry, statistics, trigonometry, measurement, and logical reasoning. Details...
This course covers linear systems and Gauss-Jordan elimination, geometric linear programming, matrices and matrix operations, symbolic logic, set theory, permutations and combinations, discrete probability, including conditional probability and Bayes' formula, random variables and their distributions, expectation, Markov chains. Details...
This course covers: a review of the Fundamental Theorem and area; methods of integration - substitution, integration by parts, trigonometric integrals, trigonometric substitution, partial fractions, and trapezoidal rule; introduction to differential equations; applications of integration - volume, arc length; L'Hospital's rule and improper integrals; infinite sequences and series, tests of convergence for infinite series, Taylor polynomials and series, and applications. Students will use a computer algebra system in the lab to improve their conceptual understanding, aid visualization, and to solve problems. Details...
This course covers: a review of the Fundamental Theorem and area; methods of integration - substitution, integration by parts, trigonometric integrals, trigonometric substitution, partial fractions, and trapezoidal rule; introduction to differential equations; applications of integration - volume, arc length; L'Hospital's rule and improper integrals; infinite sequences and series, tests of convergence for infinite series, Taylor polynomials and series, and applications. Students will use a computer algebra system in the lab to improve their conceptual understanding, aid visualization, and to solve problems. Details...
College Preparatory Physics II is designed to provide students with the equivalent of ABE Provincial Level Physics or Grade 12 Physics. The course includes vectors using trigonometry, kinematics in one and two dimensions, energy and momentum, statics and dynamics, rotational dynamics, vibrations and waves, electromagnetism, and geometric optics. Details...
This is the second of the Introduction to Physics courses. PHY 101 includes light and optics, electricity and magnetism, and special relativity. Laboratory work is used to reinforce theoretical concepts and develop laboratory skills and concepts. Details...
Principles of Physics I and II are first year university level (calculus based) foundation courses in physics designed as essential prerequisites to further courses in the physical sciences. PHY 121 includes electricity and magnetism, light, optics and modern physics. This course includes extensive laboratory work intended to illustrate theoretical concepts and to develop laboratory skills. Details...
This course is an introduction to engineering mechanics for students planning to transfer into a University engineering program. The course introduces a methodology for analysis of forces and moments acting on, or within, rigid bodies, structures and machines that are in static equilibrium. Topics include conditions of equilibrium and applications to particles and rigid bodies; analysis of structures, including beams, trusses and arches; bending moment and shear force diagrams for beams; dry friction. Details...
This course is an introduction to engineering mechanics for students planning to transfer into a University engineering program. The course introduces a methodology for analysis of forces and moments acting on, or within, rigid bodies, structures and machines that are in static equilibrium. Topics include conditions of equilibrium and applications to particles and rigid bodies; analysis of structures, including beams, trusses and arches; bending moment and shear force diagrams for beams; dry friction. Details...
This course introduces the basic concepts and techniques of descriptive and inferential statistics. It is designed to help students develop a working knowledge of statistics, as well as an awareness of the practical applications of statistics in diverse fields such as the biological and social sciences and business. Topics include: descriptive statistics, bivariate analysis, data collection, probability, random variables, sampling distribution of a statistic, estimation of a parameter and tests of hypotheses for one population, estimation and tests of hypotheses for two or more populations. Students will use statistics software to perform basic statistical data analysis. Details...

Spring 2019

English 098 is designed to prepare students for the reading, writing, and critical thinking demands they will encounter in either the workplace, college programs or university-level courses. The course assists students to develop reading, research and reference skills and write effective sentences, paragraphs, and a variety of essays. A research essay or a research assignment will also be produced. They will also apply critical thinking skills to situations ranging from problem solving to media literacy. This course satisfies the requirements for English in the ABE Provincial Level Diploma Program. Credit will only be granted for either ENG 096 or ENG 098. Details...
Foundations of Mathematics includes rates, systems of linear equations, quadratic functions, geometry, statistics, trigonometry, measurement, and logical reasoning. Details...

Fall 2019

This audio-visual course focuses on the cross-cultural study of human diversity. Topics include patterns of subsistence, linguistics, social, political and economic organization, religion, aesthetics, and the future of humanity. Details...
An examination of traditional and post-contact aboriginal societies using a culture area approach. This background will lead to consideration of the status of Aboriginal People in contemporary Canadian Society. Details...
An introduction to the core concepts, basic data sources, and general research findings in the field of Criminology. A key focus is on elements of continuity and discontinuity between traditional and contemporary theories of crime, deviance, criminality, and social control. Particular attention is paid to the Canadian context. Details...
This course will expand on the foundational knowledge, skills and values discussed in Part II with more emphasis on application of both guiding and caring and working effectively as part of a team with colleagues, families and community. This will include looking at more challenging behaviours and how to use observation and creative problem solving as part of a team to plan effective intervention. Students will take a closer look at what it means to include families in a meaningful way. Details...
ENG 116 introduces university-level research and writing in the humanities and social sciences and/or natural sciences with a specific focus on contemporary Indigenous issues in Canada. Students will critically analyze and study the writing, oral and aural practices of Indigenous scholars and teachers in a variety of disciplines and settings. Emphasis is placed on respecting and interweaving non-Indigenous and Indigenous ways of knowing and research methodologies in writing a post-secondary research paper. Students may not receive credit for ENG 116 if they have previously completed ENG 115, ENG 117 or ENG 125. Details...
This course focuses on the complex relationships between people and the environment. It provides an introduction to how the biosphere functions, examines the impacts of human activities and resource exploitation on the environment, and considers the potential for a sustainable society. Topics covered include; energy flow, biogeochemical cycles, ecosystem structure and dynamics, climate change, water resources, marine resources, biodiversity loss, protected areas and endangered species, human population growth, ecological footprint analysis, and environmental world-views. Details...
This course surveys the world of early modern Europe from the flowering of the Renaissance in Italy and northern Europe, through the age of the religious wars in the seventeenth century, the eighteenth century Age of Enlightenment, and developments in eastern Europe and Russia, culminating in the great watershed of the French Revolution. In addition to covering military and political developments, the course also describes the changes wrought in the social and economic lives of the people of the emerging nation states of Europe. Details...
An introduction to selected problems in the philosophy of religion, metaphysics (theory of reality), and epistemology (theory of knowledge). Topics include the existence of God; the nature of mind and its relation to body; computers and consciousness; personal identity and mortality; freewill and determinism; the nature and sources of knowledge; and the justification of scientific beliefs. Details...

Winter 2020

This course is an introduction to the sub-fields of anthropology: physical anthropology and archaeology. Through readings and audio-visual material, the origins and development of humans and their cultures are explored, including the development of the civilizations of the Old and New World. Details...
This course surveys the methods and theoretical conceptions which archaeologists use to interpret world prehistory using selected sites from throughout the world. Weather permitting, location and excavation of a contemporary site may be attempted. Details...
An introduction to the structure and operation of the Canadian criminal justice system, including the police, courts, and corrections. Analysis of the patterns of crime and victimization, police discretion and decision-making; criminal sentencing; correctional institutions and community-based models; and the youth justice system. Patterns of contact and conflict between various social groups and the criminal justice system are also examined. Details...
This course is designed to prepare students for the administration and supervisory responsibilities in an early childhood care and education facility. In addition to an overview of broad concepts and principles related to administration, specific roles and responsibilities of the administrator will be addressed. Discussion of current trends and issues within the ECCE profession will be included. Details...
GEO 112 critically examines the complex relations between people and places through key themes and concepts in the cultural, urban and economic fields of human geography. Topics to be studied include: local and popular cultures and landscapes, disappearing peoples, concepts of nature, the agricultural revolutions, global agricultural restructuring, agribusiness, food security, urban and suburban processes, development issues in the less developed world, barriers to and the costs of economic development, globalization, deindustrialization, and social change in the world system. Details...
This course is an introduction to engineering mechanics for students planning to transfer into a University engineering program. The course introduces a methodology for analysis of forces and moments acting on, or within, rigid bodies, structures and machines that are in static equilibrium. Topics include conditions of equilibrium and applications to particles and rigid bodies; analysis of structures, including beams, trusses and arches; bending moment and shear force diagrams for beams; dry friction. Details...
This course is an introduction to engineering mechanics for students planning to transfer into a University engineering program. The course introduces a methodology for analysis of forces and moments acting on, or within, rigid bodies, structures and machines that are in static equilibrium. Topics include conditions of equilibrium and applications to particles and rigid bodies; analysis of structures, including beams, trusses and arches; bending moment and shear force diagrams for beams; dry friction. Details...
This course introduces the basic concepts and techniques of descriptive and inferential statistics. It is designed to help students develop a working knowledge of statistics, as well as an awareness of the practical applications of statistics in diverse fields such as the biological and social sciences and business. Topics include: descriptive statistics, bivariate analysis, data collection, probability, random variables, sampling distribution of a statistic, estimation of a parameter and tests of hypotheses for one population, estimation and tests of hypotheses for two or more populations. Students will use statistics software to perform basic statistical data analysis. Details...

Fall 2019

This course will expand on the foundational knowledge, skills and values discussed in Part II with more emphasis on application of both guiding and caring and working effectively as part of a team with colleagues, families and community. This will include looking at more challenging behaviours and how to use observation and creative problem solving as part of a team to plan effective intervention. Students will take a closer look at what it means to include families in a meaningful way. Details...

Winter 2020

This course is designed to prepare students for the administration and supervisory responsibilities in an early childhood care and education facility. In addition to an overview of broad concepts and principles related to administration, specific roles and responsibilities of the administrator will be addressed. Discussion of current trends and issues within the ECCE profession will be included. Details...