ITV Courses

Fall 2019

This course will expand on the foundational knowledge, skills and values discussed in Part II with more emphasis on application of both guiding and caring and working effectively as part of a team with colleagues, families and community. This will include looking at more challenging behaviours and how to use observation and creative problem solving as part of a team to plan effective intervention. Students will take a closer look at what it means to include families in a meaningful way. Details...

Winter 2020

This course is an introduction to the sub-fields of anthropology: physical anthropology and archaeology. Through readings and audio-visual material, the origins and development of humans and their cultures are explored, including the development of the civilizations of the Old and New World. Details...
This course surveys the methods and theoretical conceptions which archaeologists use to interpret world prehistory using selected sites from throughout the world. Weather permitting, location and excavation of a contemporary site may be attempted. Details...
This course introduces students to the basic management functions of planning and decision-making, organizing resources, leading and motivating groups and individuals, and controlling worker output to maximize effectiveness and efficiency. Students learn about the importance of management to the success of all organizations. Details...
College Preparatory Chemistry II is designed to provide students with the equivalent of Grade 12 Chemistry. The content of the course includes: gas laws, thermochemistry, reaction rates, chemical equilibrium, acids and bases, redox reactions and electrochemistry. Details...
An introduction to the structure and operation of the Canadian criminal justice system, including the police, courts, and corrections. Analysis of the patterns of crime and victimization, police discretion and decision-making; criminal sentencing; correctional institutions and community-based models; and the youth justice system. Patterns of contact and conflict between various social groups and the criminal justice system are also examined. Details...
This course is designed to prepare students for the administration and supervisory responsibilities in an early childhood care and education facility. In addition to an overview of broad concepts and principles related to administration, specific roles and responsibilities of the administrator will be addressed. Discussion of current trends and issues within the ECCE profession will be included. Details...
English 098 is designed to prepare students for the reading, writing, and critical thinking demands they will encounter in the workplace, college programs or university-level courses. The course assists students to develop reading, research and reference skills and write a range of technical, professional and academic assignments. They will also apply critical thinking skills to situations ranging from problem solving to media literacy. This course satisfies the requirements for English in the ABE Provincial Level Diploma Program. Credit will only be granted for either ENG 096 or ENG 098. Details...
English 127 introduces students to Indigenous literatures in Canada with emphasis on their historical, political, and cultural contexts. Students will study works selected from various genres, including story-telling, both oral and written, non-fiction writing, novels, short stories, drama, and poetry, as well as art, film, and digital media. They will learn to write reflective and scholarly analysis by interweaving Indigenous and Western approaches to textual interpretation and literary criticism. Students may not receive credit for ENG 127 if they have previously completed ENG 120, ENG 121 or ENG 126 Details...
English 225 is a survey of literature written in English by women from the early 20th century to the present. The course will focus on works in a variety of genres, including poetry, short and long fiction, and non-fiction, on the history of modern women's writing, and how the female voice has helped to shape the modern English literary tradition. Details...
GEO 112 critically examines the complex relations between people and places through key themes and concepts in the cultural, urban and economic fields of human geography. Topics to be studied include: local and popular cultures and landscapes, disappearing peoples, concepts of nature, the agricultural revolutions, global agricultural restructuring, agribusiness, food security, urban and suburban processes, development issues in the less developed world, barriers to and the costs of economic development, globalization, deindustrialization, and social change in the world system. Details...
This course combines an introduction to the religions of Asia with comparative analysis of some key organizing themes for the study of all world religions. It examines the origins and historical development, the sacred texts, the central tenets, the institutions and rituals of Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism, Confucianism, Taoism and Shinto. It also explores selected core concepts such as sacred space, sacred time, sacred rituals and sacred symbols in a comparative context that uses not only these seven eastern religions but also the Abrahamic tradition and other world religions as reference points. Instruction will combine intensive reading, seminar discussion and lecture presentations. Details...
This course combines an introduction to the religions of Asia with comparative analysis of some key organizing themes for the study of all world religions. It examines the origins and historical development, the sacred texts, the central tenets, the institutions and rituals of Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism, Confucianism, Taoism and Shinto. It also explores selected core concepts such as sacred space, sacred time, sacred rituals and sacred symbols in a comparative context that uses not only these seven eastern religions but also the Abrahamic tradition and other world religions as reference points. Instruction will combine intensive reading, seminar discussion and lecture presentations. Details...
Advanced Mathematics is the equivalent of B.C. Ministry of Education Principles of Mathematics 11. The content of MAT 053 includes: real numbers, algebraic expressions, equations, polynomials, rational and radical expressions and relations, quadratic equations and trigonometry(functions and solving right and oblique triangles). Details...
This course covers linear systems and Gauss-Jordan elimination, geometric linear programming, matrices and matrix operations, symbolic logic, set theory, permutations and combinations, discrete probability, including conditional probability and Bayes' formula, random variables and their distributions, expectation, Markov chains. Details...
This course covers: a review of the Fundamental Theorem and area; methods of integration - substitution, integration by parts, trigonometric integrals, trigonometric substitution, partial fractions, and trapezoidal rule; introduction to differential equations; applications of integration - volume, arc length; L'Hospital's rule and improper integrals; infinite sequences and series, tests of convergence for infinite series, Taylor polynomials and series, and applications. Students will use a computer algebra system in the lab to improve their conceptual understanding, aid visualization, and to solve problems. Details...
This course covers: a review of the Fundamental Theorem and area; methods of integration - substitution, integration by parts, trigonometric integrals, trigonometric substitution, partial fractions, and trapezoidal rule; introduction to differential equations; applications of integration - volume, arc length; L'Hospital's rule and improper integrals; infinite sequences and series, tests of convergence for infinite series, Taylor polynomials and series, and applications. Students will use a computer algebra system in the lab to improve their conceptual understanding, aid visualization, and to solve problems. Details...
College Preparatory Physics II is designed to provide students with the equivalent of ABE Provincial Level Physics or Grade 12 Physics. The course includes vectors using trigonometry, kinematics in one and two dimensions, energy and momentum, statics and dynamics, rotational dynamics, vibrations and waves, electromagnetism, and geometric optics. Details...
This is the second of the Introduction to Physics courses. PHY 101 includes light and optics, electricity and magnetism, and special relativity. Laboratory work is used to reinforce theoretical concepts and develop laboratory skills and concepts. Details...
Principles of Physics I and II are first year university level (calculus based) foundation courses in physics designed as essential prerequisites to further courses in the physical sciences. PHY 121 includes electricity and magnetism, light, optics and modern physics. This course includes extensive laboratory work intended to illustrate theoretical concepts and to develop laboratory skills. Details...
This course is an introduction to engineering mechanics for students planning to transfer into a University engineering program. The course introduces a methodology for analysis of forces and moments acting on, or within, rigid bodies, structures and machines that are in static equilibrium. Topics include conditions of equilibrium and applications to particles and rigid bodies; analysis of structures, including beams, trusses and arches; bending moment and shear force diagrams for beams; dry friction. Details...
This course is an introduction to engineering mechanics for students planning to transfer into a University engineering program. The course introduces a methodology for analysis of forces and moments acting on, or within, rigid bodies, structures and machines that are in static equilibrium. Topics include conditions of equilibrium and applications to particles and rigid bodies; analysis of structures, including beams, trusses and arches; bending moment and shear force diagrams for beams; dry friction. Details...
This course examines the legislation influencing Practical Nursing practice with clients experiencing chronic illness and those in residential care settings. Specific professional issues such as responsibility, accountability, ethical practice, and leadership relevant to the Practical Nursing role in residential care will be explored. Critical thinking and decision making specific to the care of clients withchronic health challenges and interprofessional practice are also addressed. Details...
This course focuses on health promotion as it relates to the aging process including exploring health promotion activities aimed at supporting clients to maintain their health. The concepts of health promotion, physical and mental wellness, normal aging changes and continued independence are examined. Details...
This course focuses on pathophysiology as it relates to the ageing process and selected chronic illness. The main focus is on the care of the older adult experiencing a health challenge. Cultural diversity in healing practices are explored as well as evidence-informed research and practice. Details...
This course provides the learner with an opportunity to develop professional communication skills with the older adult and clients requiring end -f-life care. Interprofessional communication knowledge and skills are further developed.d. Details...
This course builds on Pharmacology I to increase the learners' understanding of pharmacotherapeutics prescribed for illnesses that clients experience across the lifespan. Topics include drug classifications and links with common diseases/illnesses based on a body system approach to drug resistance. Details...
This course builds on Pharmacology I to increase the learners' understanding of pharmacotherapeutics prescribed for illnesses that clients experience across the lifespan. Topics include drug classifications and links with common diseases/illnesses based on a body system approach to drug resistance. Details...
This course builds on the foundation of Level 1 and emphasizes the development of clinical decision making, nursing assessments, and interventions to promote the health of older adults. A variety of approaches (eg. Simulation) will help learners to integrate theory from Level 1 and Level 2 courses to provide safe, competent and ethical nursing care with older adults. Details...
This course builds on the foundation of Level 1 and emphasizes the development of clinical decision making, nursing assessments, and interventions to promote the health of older adults. A variety of approaches (eg. Simulation) will help learners to integrate theory from Level 1 and Level 2 courses to provide safe, competent and ethical nursing care with older adults. Details...
The course covers selected disorders listed in the current version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), focusing on the nature of each disorder, biopsychosocial explanations of each disorder, and relevant treatments. Legal and ethical issues are also addressed. Students are introduced to relevant psychological theories and research findings, and are encouraged to develop an appreciation of the value of psychological research. Details...
This course introduces the basic concepts and techniques of descriptive and inferential statistics. It is designed to help students develop a working knowledge of statistics, as well as an awareness of the practical applications of statistics in diverse fields such as the biological and social sciences and business. Topics include: descriptive statistics, bivariate analysis, data collection, probability, random variables, sampling distribution of a statistic, estimation of a parameter and tests of hypotheses for one population, estimation and tests of hypotheses for two or more populations. Students will use statistics software to perform basic statistical data analysis. Details...

Spring 2020

Advanced English is designed to provide students with the skills needed for the reading, writing and critical thinking tasks that are required for college programs and employment. Students will develop their communicative abilities via assignments that promote academic and business reading, writing, and research skills. Details...
English 098 is designed to prepare students for the reading, writing, and critical thinking demands they will encounter in the workplace, college programs or university-level courses. The course assists students to develop reading, research and reference skills and write a range of technical, professional and academic assignments. They will also apply critical thinking skills to situations ranging from problem solving to media literacy. This course satisfies the requirements for English in the ABE Provincial Level Diploma Program. Credit will only be granted for either ENG 096 or ENG 098. Details...
ENG 115 involves the study of university level critical analysis and the production of expository and persuasive writing appropriate to university level discourse across the curriculum. A variety of rhetorical models are studied and practiced. Emphasis is placed on research, documentation and the writing of a research paper. Students may not receive credit for ENG 115 if they have previously completed ENG 116 or ENG 117. Details...
Foundations of Mathematics includes rates, systems of linear equations, quadratic functions, geometry, statistics, trigonometry, measurement, and logical reasoning. Details...
The goals of the Provincial Algebra and Trigonometry are to prepare adult learners with the knowledge and skills in algebra and trigonometry necessary for entry to technical, vocational and career programs that require Math 12 equivalency as a prerequisite and for future study in higher-level math courses at college/university. Details...
PSY 204 provides an introduction to basic research techniques in psychology; emphasis on the conceptual rather than the statistical rationale underlying various research strategies. Areas include the nature of variables, types of measurement, how to generate and test hypotheses, types of validity, and how to interpret and report results. Laboratory exercises and class demonstrations on the processes involved in conducting empirical research. Research process (theory, models, hypotheses, predictions); research ethics; experimental methods; non-experimental methods; validity; reliability; sampling; descriptive statistics; central tendency; variability; inferential statistics; and experimental design. Details...
The course covers selected disorders listed in the current version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), focusing on the nature of each disorder, biopsychosocial explanations of each disorder, and relevant treatments. Legal and ethical issues are also addressed. Students are introduced to relevant psychological theories and research findings, and are encouraged to develop an appreciation of the value of psychological research. Details...
This course provides an overview of child development up to, but not including adolescence. The impact of genetics and environment, major theories of human development, methods for studying child development, cultural diversity, and development in the physical, cognitive, emotional and social spheres are included. Details...

Fall 2019

This course will expand on the foundational knowledge, skills and values discussed in Part II with more emphasis on application of both guiding and caring and working effectively as part of a team with colleagues, families and community. This will include looking at more challenging behaviours and how to use observation and creative problem solving as part of a team to plan effective intervention. Students will take a closer look at what it means to include families in a meaningful way. Details...

Winter 2020

This course surveys the methods and theoretical conceptions which archaeologists use to interpret world prehistory using selected sites from throughout the world. Weather permitting, location and excavation of a contemporary site may be attempted. Details...
This course introduces students to the basic management functions of planning and decision-making, organizing resources, leading and motivating groups and individuals, and controlling worker output to maximize effectiveness and efficiency. Students learn about the importance of management to the success of all organizations. Details...
An introduction to the structure and operation of the Canadian criminal justice system, including the police, courts, and corrections. Analysis of the patterns of crime and victimization, police discretion and decision-making; criminal sentencing; correctional institutions and community-based models; and the youth justice system. Patterns of contact and conflict between various social groups and the criminal justice system are also examined. Details...
This course is designed to prepare students for the administration and supervisory responsibilities in an early childhood care and education facility. In addition to an overview of broad concepts and principles related to administration, specific roles and responsibilities of the administrator will be addressed. Discussion of current trends and issues within the ECCE profession will be included. Details...
English 098 is designed to prepare students for the reading, writing, and critical thinking demands they will encounter in the workplace, college programs or university-level courses. The course assists students to develop reading, research and reference skills and write a range of technical, professional and academic assignments. They will also apply critical thinking skills to situations ranging from problem solving to media literacy. This course satisfies the requirements for English in the ABE Provincial Level Diploma Program. Credit will only be granted for either ENG 096 or ENG 098. Details...
This course is an introduction to university-level research and writing in the humanities and social sciences and/or natural sciences. It is designed to help students acquire the research skills and understand the writing practices used by scholars in a variety of academic disciplines. As a way of focusing discussion, students will examine different disciplinary approaches to a single research topic. Note: Credit will only be granted for ENG 115 or ENG 117 or ENG 125. Details...
This course combines an intensive survey of contemporarty and historical travel writing with a study and practice of creative writing in fiction and non-fiction genres. The focus will be on the learning of the craft and writing through discussion, exercises and peer critiquing and when possible, travel. Details...
English 225 is a survey of literature written in English by women from the early 20th century to the present. The course will focus on works in a variety of genres, including poetry, short and long fiction, and non-fiction, on the history of modern women's writing, and how the female voice has helped to shape the modern English literary tradition. Details...
GEO 112 critically examines the complex relations between people and places through key themes and concepts in the cultural, urban and economic fields of human geography. Topics to be studied include: local and popular cultures and landscapes, disappearing peoples, concepts of nature, the agricultural revolutions, global agricultural restructuring, agribusiness, food security, urban and suburban processes, development issues in the less developed world, barriers to and the costs of economic development, globalization, deindustrialization, and social change in the world system. Details...
This course combines an introduction to the religions of Asia with comparative analysis of some key organizing themes for the study of all world religions. It examines the origins and historical development, the sacred texts, the central tenets, the institutions and rituals of Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism, Confucianism, Taoism and Shinto. It also explores selected core concepts such as sacred space, sacred time, sacred rituals and sacred symbols in a comparative context that uses not only these seven eastern religions but also the Abrahamic tradition and other world religions as reference points. Instruction will combine intensive reading, seminar discussion and lecture presentations. Details...
This course combines an introduction to the religions of Asia with comparative analysis of some key organizing themes for the study of all world religions. It examines the origins and historical development, the sacred texts, the central tenets, the institutions and rituals of Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism, Confucianism, Taoism and Shinto. It also explores selected core concepts such as sacred space, sacred time, sacred rituals and sacred symbols in a comparative context that uses not only these seven eastern religions but also the Abrahamic tradition and other world religions as reference points. Instruction will combine intensive reading, seminar discussion and lecture presentations. Details...
This course covers linear systems and Gauss-Jordan elimination, geometric linear programming, matrices and matrix operations, symbolic logic, set theory, permutations and combinations, discrete probability, including conditional probability and Bayes' formula, random variables and their distributions, expectation, Markov chains. Details...
This course covers: a review of the Fundamental Theorem and area; methods of integration - substitution, integration by parts, trigonometric integrals, trigonometric substitution, partial fractions, and trapezoidal rule; introduction to differential equations; applications of integration - volume, arc length; L'Hospital's rule and improper integrals; infinite sequences and series, tests of convergence for infinite series, Taylor polynomials and series, and applications. Students will use a computer algebra system in the lab to improve their conceptual understanding, aid visualization, and to solve problems. Details...
This course covers: a review of the Fundamental Theorem and area; methods of integration - substitution, integration by parts, trigonometric integrals, trigonometric substitution, partial fractions, and trapezoidal rule; introduction to differential equations; applications of integration - volume, arc length; L'Hospital's rule and improper integrals; infinite sequences and series, tests of convergence for infinite series, Taylor polynomials and series, and applications. Students will use a computer algebra system in the lab to improve their conceptual understanding, aid visualization, and to solve problems. Details...
This is the second of the Introduction to Physics courses. PHY 101 includes light and optics, electricity and magnetism, and special relativity. Laboratory work is used to reinforce theoretical concepts and develop laboratory skills and concepts. Details...
Principles of Physics I and II are first year university level (calculus based) foundation courses in physics designed as essential prerequisites to further courses in the physical sciences. PHY 121 includes electricity and magnetism, light, optics and modern physics. This course includes extensive laboratory work intended to illustrate theoretical concepts and to develop laboratory skills. Details...
This course is an introduction to engineering mechanics for students planning to transfer into a University engineering program. The course introduces a methodology for analysis of forces and moments acting on, or within, rigid bodies, structures and machines that are in static equilibrium. Topics include conditions of equilibrium and applications to particles and rigid bodies; analysis of structures, including beams, trusses and arches; bending moment and shear force diagrams for beams; dry friction. Details...
This course is an introduction to engineering mechanics for students planning to transfer into a University engineering program. The course introduces a methodology for analysis of forces and moments acting on, or within, rigid bodies, structures and machines that are in static equilibrium. Topics include conditions of equilibrium and applications to particles and rigid bodies; analysis of structures, including beams, trusses and arches; bending moment and shear force diagrams for beams; dry friction. Details...
This course is an introduction to engineering mechanics for students planning to transfer into engineering at UBC. Students will study the statics, kinematics and dynamics of particles and rigid bodies. They will apply vector analysis to three-dimensional static-equilibrium problems, and differential and integral calculus to dynamics problems, as well as make use of Newton's laws and the concepts of impulse, momentum, work and energy. Students will focus on the analysis of practical mechanics problems in two and three dimensions. Details...
This course is an introduction to engineering mechanics for students planning to transfer into engineering at UBC. Students will study the statics, kinematics and dynamics of particles and rigid bodies. They will apply vector analysis to three-dimensional static-equilibrium problems, and differential and integral calculus to dynamics problems, as well as make use of Newton's laws and the concepts of impulse, momentum, work and energy. Students will focus on the analysis of practical mechanics problems in two and three dimensions. Details...
The course covers selected disorders listed in the current version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), focusing on the nature of each disorder, biopsychosocial explanations of each disorder, and relevant treatments. Legal and ethical issues are also addressed. Students are introduced to relevant psychological theories and research findings, and are encouraged to develop an appreciation of the value of psychological research. Details...

Spring 2020

Advanced English is designed to provide students with the skills needed for the reading, writing and critical thinking tasks that are required for college programs and employment. Students will develop their communicative abilities via assignments that promote academic and business reading, writing, and research skills. Details...
English 098 is designed to prepare students for the reading, writing, and critical thinking demands they will encounter in the workplace, college programs or university-level courses. The course assists students to develop reading, research and reference skills and write a range of technical, professional and academic assignments. They will also apply critical thinking skills to situations ranging from problem solving to media literacy. This course satisfies the requirements for English in the ABE Provincial Level Diploma Program. Credit will only be granted for either ENG 096 or ENG 098. Details...
ENG 115 involves the study of university level critical analysis and the production of expository and persuasive writing appropriate to university level discourse across the curriculum. A variety of rhetorical models are studied and practiced. Emphasis is placed on research, documentation and the writing of a research paper. Students may not receive credit for ENG 115 if they have previously completed ENG 116 or ENG 117. Details...
Foundations of Mathematics includes rates, systems of linear equations, quadratic functions, geometry, statistics, trigonometry, measurement, and logical reasoning. Details...
The goals of the Provincial Algebra and Trigonometry are to prepare adult learners with the knowledge and skills in algebra and trigonometry necessary for entry to technical, vocational and career programs that require Math 12 equivalency as a prerequisite and for future study in higher-level math courses at college/university. Details...
PSY 204 provides an introduction to basic research techniques in psychology; emphasis on the conceptual rather than the statistical rationale underlying various research strategies. Areas include the nature of variables, types of measurement, how to generate and test hypotheses, types of validity, and how to interpret and report results. Laboratory exercises and class demonstrations on the processes involved in conducting empirical research. Research process (theory, models, hypotheses, predictions); research ethics; experimental methods; non-experimental methods; validity; reliability; sampling; descriptive statistics; central tendency; variability; inferential statistics; and experimental design. Details...
The course covers selected disorders listed in the current version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), focusing on the nature of each disorder, biopsychosocial explanations of each disorder, and relevant treatments. Legal and ethical issues are also addressed. Students are introduced to relevant psychological theories and research findings, and are encouraged to develop an appreciation of the value of psychological research. Details...
This course provides an overview of child development up to, but not including adolescence. The impact of genetics and environment, major theories of human development, methods for studying child development, cultural diversity, and development in the physical, cognitive, emotional and social spheres are included. Details...

Fall 2019

This course will expand on the foundational knowledge, skills and values discussed in Part II with more emphasis on application of both guiding and caring and working effectively as part of a team with colleagues, families and community. This will include looking at more challenging behaviours and how to use observation and creative problem solving as part of a team to plan effective intervention. Students will take a closer look at what it means to include families in a meaningful way. Details...

Winter 2020

This course is an introduction to the sub-fields of anthropology: physical anthropology and archaeology. Through readings and audio-visual material, the origins and development of humans and their cultures are explored, including the development of the civilizations of the Old and New World. Details...
This course surveys the methods and theoretical conceptions which archaeologists use to interpret world prehistory using selected sites from throughout the world. Weather permitting, location and excavation of a contemporary site may be attempted. Details...
This course introduces students to the basic management functions of planning and decision-making, organizing resources, leading and motivating groups and individuals, and controlling worker output to maximize effectiveness and efficiency. Students learn about the importance of management to the success of all organizations. Details...
College Preparatory Chemistry II is designed to provide students with the equivalent of Grade 12 Chemistry. The content of the course includes: gas laws, thermochemistry, reaction rates, chemical equilibrium, acids and bases, redox reactions and electrochemistry. Details...
An introduction to the structure and operation of the Canadian criminal justice system, including the police, courts, and corrections. Analysis of the patterns of crime and victimization, police discretion and decision-making; criminal sentencing; correctional institutions and community-based models; and the youth justice system. Patterns of contact and conflict between various social groups and the criminal justice system are also examined. Details...
This course is designed to prepare students for the administration and supervisory responsibilities in an early childhood care and education facility. In addition to an overview of broad concepts and principles related to administration, specific roles and responsibilities of the administrator will be addressed. Discussion of current trends and issues within the ECCE profession will be included. Details...
English 098 is designed to prepare students for the reading, writing, and critical thinking demands they will encounter in the workplace, college programs or university-level courses. The course assists students to develop reading, research and reference skills and write a range of technical, professional and academic assignments. They will also apply critical thinking skills to situations ranging from problem solving to media literacy. This course satisfies the requirements for English in the ABE Provincial Level Diploma Program. Credit will only be granted for either ENG 096 or ENG 098. Details...
ENG 115 involves the study of university level critical analysis and the production of expository and persuasive writing appropriate to university level discourse across the curriculum. A variety of rhetorical models are studied and practiced. Emphasis is placed on research, documentation and the writing of a research paper. Students may not receive credit for ENG 115 if they have previously completed ENG 116 or ENG 117. Details...
English 127 introduces students to Indigenous literatures in Canada with emphasis on their historical, political, and cultural contexts. Students will study works selected from various genres, including story-telling, both oral and written, non-fiction writing, novels, short stories, drama, and poetry, as well as art, film, and digital media. They will learn to write reflective and scholarly analysis by interweaving Indigenous and Western approaches to textual interpretation and literary criticism. Students may not receive credit for ENG 127 if they have previously completed ENG 120, ENG 121 or ENG 126 Details...
English 225 is a survey of literature written in English by women from the early 20th century to the present. The course will focus on works in a variety of genres, including poetry, short and long fiction, and non-fiction, on the history of modern women's writing, and how the female voice has helped to shape the modern English literary tradition. Details...
GEO 112 critically examines the complex relations between people and places through key themes and concepts in the cultural, urban and economic fields of human geography. Topics to be studied include: local and popular cultures and landscapes, disappearing peoples, concepts of nature, the agricultural revolutions, global agricultural restructuring, agribusiness, food security, urban and suburban processes, development issues in the less developed world, barriers to and the costs of economic development, globalization, deindustrialization, and social change in the world system. Details...
This course combines an introduction to the religions of Asia with comparative analysis of some key organizing themes for the study of all world religions. It examines the origins and historical development, the sacred texts, the central tenets, the institutions and rituals of Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism, Confucianism, Taoism and Shinto. It also explores selected core concepts such as sacred space, sacred time, sacred rituals and sacred symbols in a comparative context that uses not only these seven eastern religions but also the Abrahamic tradition and other world religions as reference points. Instruction will combine intensive reading, seminar discussion and lecture presentations. Details...
This course combines an introduction to the religions of Asia with comparative analysis of some key organizing themes for the study of all world religions. It examines the origins and historical development, the sacred texts, the central tenets, the institutions and rituals of Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism, Confucianism, Taoism and Shinto. It also explores selected core concepts such as sacred space, sacred time, sacred rituals and sacred symbols in a comparative context that uses not only these seven eastern religions but also the Abrahamic tradition and other world religions as reference points. Instruction will combine intensive reading, seminar discussion and lecture presentations. Details...
Advanced Mathematics is the equivalent of B.C. Ministry of Education Principles of Mathematics 11. The content of MAT 053 includes: real numbers, algebraic expressions, equations, polynomials, rational and radical expressions and relations, quadratic equations and trigonometry(functions and solving right and oblique triangles). Details...
This course covers linear systems and Gauss-Jordan elimination, geometric linear programming, matrices and matrix operations, symbolic logic, set theory, permutations and combinations, discrete probability, including conditional probability and Bayes' formula, random variables and their distributions, expectation, Markov chains. Details...
This course covers: a review of the Fundamental Theorem and area; methods of integration - substitution, integration by parts, trigonometric integrals, trigonometric substitution, partial fractions, and trapezoidal rule; introduction to differential equations; applications of integration - volume, arc length; L'Hospital's rule and improper integrals; infinite sequences and series, tests of convergence for infinite series, Taylor polynomials and series, and applications. Students will use a computer algebra system in the lab to improve their conceptual understanding, aid visualization, and to solve problems. Details...
This course covers: a review of the Fundamental Theorem and area; methods of integration - substitution, integration by parts, trigonometric integrals, trigonometric substitution, partial fractions, and trapezoidal rule; introduction to differential equations; applications of integration - volume, arc length; L'Hospital's rule and improper integrals; infinite sequences and series, tests of convergence for infinite series, Taylor polynomials and series, and applications. Students will use a computer algebra system in the lab to improve their conceptual understanding, aid visualization, and to solve problems. Details...
College Preparatory Physics II is designed to provide students with the equivalent of ABE Provincial Level Physics or Grade 12 Physics. The course includes vectors using trigonometry, kinematics in one and two dimensions, energy and momentum, statics and dynamics, rotational dynamics, vibrations and waves, electromagnetism, and geometric optics. Details...
This is the second of the Introduction to Physics courses. PHY 101 includes light and optics, electricity and magnetism, and special relativity. Laboratory work is used to reinforce theoretical concepts and develop laboratory skills and concepts. Details...
Principles of Physics I and II are first year university level (calculus based) foundation courses in physics designed as essential prerequisites to further courses in the physical sciences. PHY 121 includes electricity and magnetism, light, optics and modern physics. This course includes extensive laboratory work intended to illustrate theoretical concepts and to develop laboratory skills. Details...
This course is an introduction to engineering mechanics for students planning to transfer into a University engineering program. The course introduces a methodology for analysis of forces and moments acting on, or within, rigid bodies, structures and machines that are in static equilibrium. Topics include conditions of equilibrium and applications to particles and rigid bodies; analysis of structures, including beams, trusses and arches; bending moment and shear force diagrams for beams; dry friction. Details...
This course is an introduction to engineering mechanics for students planning to transfer into a University engineering program. The course introduces a methodology for analysis of forces and moments acting on, or within, rigid bodies, structures and machines that are in static equilibrium. Topics include conditions of equilibrium and applications to particles and rigid bodies; analysis of structures, including beams, trusses and arches; bending moment and shear force diagrams for beams; dry friction. Details...
This course examines the legislation influencing Practical Nursing practice with clients experiencing chronic illness and those in residential care settings. Specific professional issues such as responsibility, accountability, ethical practice, and leadership relevant to the Practical Nursing role in residential care will be explored. Critical thinking and decision making specific to the care of clients withchronic health challenges and interprofessional practice are also addressed. Details...
This course examines the legislation influencing Practical Nursing practice with clients experiencing chronic illness and those in residential care settings. Specific professional issues such as responsibility, accountability, ethical practice, and leadership relevant to the Practical Nursing role in residential care will be explored. Critical thinking and decision making specific to the care of clients withchronic health challenges and interprofessional practice are also addressed. Details...
This course focuses on health promotion as it relates to the aging process including exploring health promotion activities aimed at supporting clients to maintain their health. The concepts of health promotion, physical and mental wellness, normal aging changes and continued independence are examined. Details...
This course focuses on pathophysiology as it relates to the ageing process and selected chronic illness. The main focus is on the care of the older adult experiencing a health challenge. Cultural diversity in healing practices are explored as well as evidence-informed research and practice. Details...
This course provides the learner with an opportunity to develop professional communication skills with the older adult and clients requiring end -f-life care. Interprofessional communication knowledge and skills are further developed.d. Details...
This course builds on Pharmacology I to increase the learners' understanding of pharmacotherapeutics prescribed for illnesses that clients experience across the lifespan. Topics include drug classifications and links with common diseases/illnesses based on a body system approach to drug resistance. Details...
This course builds on Pharmacology I to increase the learners' understanding of pharmacotherapeutics prescribed for illnesses that clients experience across the lifespan. Topics include drug classifications and links with common diseases/illnesses based on a body system approach to drug resistance. Details...
This course builds on the foundation of Level 1 and emphasizes the development of clinical decision making, nursing assessments, and interventions to promote the health of older adults. A variety of approaches (eg. Simulation) will help learners to integrate theory from Level 1 and Level 2 courses to provide safe, competent and ethical nursing care with older adults. Details...
This course builds on the foundation of Level 1 and emphasizes the development of clinical decision making, nursing assessments, and interventions to promote the health of older adults. A variety of approaches (eg. Simulation) will help learners to integrate theory from Level 1 and Level 2 courses to provide safe, competent and ethical nursing care with older adults. Details...
This course builds on the foundation of Level 1 and emphasizes the development of clinical decision making, nursing assessments, and interventions to promote the health of older adults. A variety of approaches (eg. Simulation) will help learners to integrate theory from Level 1 and Level 2 courses to provide safe, competent and ethical nursing care with older adults. Details...
This course builds on the foundation of Level 1 and emphasizes the development of clinical decision making, nursing assessments, and interventions to promote the health of older adults. A variety of approaches (eg. Simulation) will help learners to integrate theory from Level 1 and Level 2 courses to provide safe, competent and ethical nursing care with older adults. Details...
The course covers selected disorders listed in the current version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), focusing on the nature of each disorder, biopsychosocial explanations of each disorder, and relevant treatments. Legal and ethical issues are also addressed. Students are introduced to relevant psychological theories and research findings, and are encouraged to develop an appreciation of the value of psychological research. Details...
This course introduces the basic concepts and techniques of descriptive and inferential statistics. It is designed to help students develop a working knowledge of statistics, as well as an awareness of the practical applications of statistics in diverse fields such as the biological and social sciences and business. Topics include: descriptive statistics, bivariate analysis, data collection, probability, random variables, sampling distribution of a statistic, estimation of a parameter and tests of hypotheses for one population, estimation and tests of hypotheses for two or more populations. Students will use statistics software to perform basic statistical data analysis. Details...

Spring 2020

Advanced English is designed to provide students with the skills needed for the reading, writing and critical thinking tasks that are required for college programs and employment. Students will develop their communicative abilities via assignments that promote academic and business reading, writing, and research skills. Details...
English 098 is designed to prepare students for the reading, writing, and critical thinking demands they will encounter in the workplace, college programs or university-level courses. The course assists students to develop reading, research and reference skills and write a range of technical, professional and academic assignments. They will also apply critical thinking skills to situations ranging from problem solving to media literacy. This course satisfies the requirements for English in the ABE Provincial Level Diploma Program. Credit will only be granted for either ENG 096 or ENG 098. Details...
ENG 115 involves the study of university level critical analysis and the production of expository and persuasive writing appropriate to university level discourse across the curriculum. A variety of rhetorical models are studied and practiced. Emphasis is placed on research, documentation and the writing of a research paper. Students may not receive credit for ENG 115 if they have previously completed ENG 116 or ENG 117. Details...
Foundations of Mathematics includes rates, systems of linear equations, quadratic functions, geometry, statistics, trigonometry, measurement, and logical reasoning. Details...
The goals of the Provincial Algebra and Trigonometry are to prepare adult learners with the knowledge and skills in algebra and trigonometry necessary for entry to technical, vocational and career programs that require Math 12 equivalency as a prerequisite and for future study in higher-level math courses at college/university. Details...
PSY 204 provides an introduction to basic research techniques in psychology; emphasis on the conceptual rather than the statistical rationale underlying various research strategies. Areas include the nature of variables, types of measurement, how to generate and test hypotheses, types of validity, and how to interpret and report results. Laboratory exercises and class demonstrations on the processes involved in conducting empirical research. Research process (theory, models, hypotheses, predictions); research ethics; experimental methods; non-experimental methods; validity; reliability; sampling; descriptive statistics; central tendency; variability; inferential statistics; and experimental design. Details...

Fall 2019

This course will expand on the foundational knowledge, skills and values discussed in Part II with more emphasis on application of both guiding and caring and working effectively as part of a team with colleagues, families and community. This will include looking at more challenging behaviours and how to use observation and creative problem solving as part of a team to plan effective intervention. Students will take a closer look at what it means to include families in a meaningful way. Details...

Winter 2020

This course is an introduction to the sub-fields of anthropology: physical anthropology and archaeology. Through readings and audio-visual material, the origins and development of humans and their cultures are explored, including the development of the civilizations of the Old and New World. Details...
This course surveys the methods and theoretical conceptions which archaeologists use to interpret world prehistory using selected sites from throughout the world. Weather permitting, location and excavation of a contemporary site may be attempted. Details...
An introduction to the structure and operation of the Canadian criminal justice system, including the police, courts, and corrections. Analysis of the patterns of crime and victimization, police discretion and decision-making; criminal sentencing; correctional institutions and community-based models; and the youth justice system. Patterns of contact and conflict between various social groups and the criminal justice system are also examined. Details...
This course will expand on the foundational knowledge, skills and values discussed in Part II with more emphasis on application of both guiding and caring and working effectively as part of a team with colleagues, families and community. This will include looking at more challenging behaviours and how to use observation and creative problem solving as part of a team to plan effective intervention. Students will take a closer look at what it means to include families in a meaningful way. Details...
This course is designed to prepare students for the administration and supervisory responsibilities in an early childhood care and education facility. In addition to an overview of broad concepts and principles related to administration, specific roles and responsibilities of the administrator will be addressed. Discussion of current trends and issues within the ECCE profession will be included. Details...
This course is designed to prepare students for the administration and supervisory responsibilities in an early childhood care and education facility. In addition to an overview of broad concepts and principles related to administration, specific roles and responsibilities of the administrator will be addressed. Discussion of current trends and issues within the ECCE profession will be included. Details...
ENG 115 involves the study of university level critical analysis and the production of expository and persuasive writing appropriate to university level discourse across the curriculum. A variety of rhetorical models are studied and practiced. Emphasis is placed on research, documentation and the writing of a research paper. Students may not receive credit for ENG 115 if they have previously completed ENG 116 or ENG 117. Details...
English 127 introduces students to Indigenous literatures in Canada with emphasis on their historical, political, and cultural contexts. Students will study works selected from various genres, including story-telling, both oral and written, non-fiction writing, novels, short stories, drama, and poetry, as well as art, film, and digital media. They will learn to write reflective and scholarly analysis by interweaving Indigenous and Western approaches to textual interpretation and literary criticism. Students may not receive credit for ENG 127 if they have previously completed ENG 120, ENG 121 or ENG 126 Details...
GEO 112 critically examines the complex relations between people and places through key themes and concepts in the cultural, urban and economic fields of human geography. Topics to be studied include: local and popular cultures and landscapes, disappearing peoples, concepts of nature, the agricultural revolutions, global agricultural restructuring, agribusiness, food security, urban and suburban processes, development issues in the less developed world, barriers to and the costs of economic development, globalization, deindustrialization, and social change in the world system. Details...
This course is an introduction to engineering mechanics for students planning to transfer into a University engineering program. The course introduces a methodology for analysis of forces and moments acting on, or within, rigid bodies, structures and machines that are in static equilibrium. Topics include conditions of equilibrium and applications to particles and rigid bodies; analysis of structures, including beams, trusses and arches; bending moment and shear force diagrams for beams; dry friction. Details...
This course is an introduction to engineering mechanics for students planning to transfer into a University engineering program. The course introduces a methodology for analysis of forces and moments acting on, or within, rigid bodies, structures and machines that are in static equilibrium. Topics include conditions of equilibrium and applications to particles and rigid bodies; analysis of structures, including beams, trusses and arches; bending moment and shear force diagrams for beams; dry friction. Details...
The course covers selected disorders listed in the current version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), focusing on the nature of each disorder, biopsychosocial explanations of each disorder, and relevant treatments. Legal and ethical issues are also addressed. Students are introduced to relevant psychological theories and research findings, and are encouraged to develop an appreciation of the value of psychological research. Details...
This course introduces the basic concepts and techniques of descriptive and inferential statistics. It is designed to help students develop a working knowledge of statistics, as well as an awareness of the practical applications of statistics in diverse fields such as the biological and social sciences and business. Topics include: descriptive statistics, bivariate analysis, data collection, probability, random variables, sampling distribution of a statistic, estimation of a parameter and tests of hypotheses for one population, estimation and tests of hypotheses for two or more populations. Students will use statistics software to perform basic statistical data analysis. Details...

Spring 2020

Advanced English is designed to provide students with the skills needed for the reading, writing and critical thinking tasks that are required for college programs and employment. Students will develop their communicative abilities via assignments that promote academic and business reading, writing, and research skills. Details...
English 098 is designed to prepare students for the reading, writing, and critical thinking demands they will encounter in the workplace, college programs or university-level courses. The course assists students to develop reading, research and reference skills and write a range of technical, professional and academic assignments. They will also apply critical thinking skills to situations ranging from problem solving to media literacy. This course satisfies the requirements for English in the ABE Provincial Level Diploma Program. Credit will only be granted for either ENG 096 or ENG 098. Details...
Foundations of Mathematics includes rates, systems of linear equations, quadratic functions, geometry, statistics, trigonometry, measurement, and logical reasoning. Details...
The goals of the Provincial Algebra and Trigonometry are to prepare adult learners with the knowledge and skills in algebra and trigonometry necessary for entry to technical, vocational and career programs that require Math 12 equivalency as a prerequisite and for future study in higher-level math courses at college/university. Details...

Winter 2020

ENG 115 involves the study of university level critical analysis and the production of expository and persuasive writing appropriate to university level discourse across the curriculum. A variety of rhetorical models are studied and practiced. Emphasis is placed on research, documentation and the writing of a research paper. Students may not receive credit for ENG 115 if they have previously completed ENG 116 or ENG 117. Details...

Fall 2019

This course will expand on the foundational knowledge, skills and values discussed in Part II with more emphasis on application of both guiding and caring and working effectively as part of a team with colleagues, families and community. This will include looking at more challenging behaviours and how to use observation and creative problem solving as part of a team to plan effective intervention. Students will take a closer look at what it means to include families in a meaningful way. Details...

Winter 2020

This course will expand on the foundational knowledge, skills and values discussed in Part II with more emphasis on application of both guiding and caring and working effectively as part of a team with colleagues, families and community. This will include looking at more challenging behaviours and how to use observation and creative problem solving as part of a team to plan effective intervention. Students will take a closer look at what it means to include families in a meaningful way. Details...
This course is designed to prepare students for the administration and supervisory responsibilities in an early childhood care and education facility. In addition to an overview of broad concepts and principles related to administration, specific roles and responsibilities of the administrator will be addressed. Discussion of current trends and issues within the ECCE profession will be included. Details...
This course is designed to prepare students for the administration and supervisory responsibilities in an early childhood care and education facility. In addition to an overview of broad concepts and principles related to administration, specific roles and responsibilities of the administrator will be addressed. Discussion of current trends and issues within the ECCE profession will be included. Details...
The course covers selected disorders listed in the current version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), focusing on the nature of each disorder, biopsychosocial explanations of each disorder, and relevant treatments. Legal and ethical issues are also addressed. Students are introduced to relevant psychological theories and research findings, and are encouraged to develop an appreciation of the value of psychological research. Details...