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CRM-101 Introduction to Criminology

3 hours lecture, or distance (D), 3 credits


An introduction to the core concepts, basic data sources, and general research findings in the field of Criminology. A key focus is on elements of continuity and discontinuity between traditional and contemporary theories of crime, deviance, criminality, and social control. Particular attention is paid to the Canadian context.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090; or placement testing.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

CRM-131 Introduction to the Criminal Justice System

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


An introduction to the structure and operation of the Canadian criminal justice system, including the police, courts, and corrections. Analysis of the patterns of crime and victimization, police discretion and decision-making; criminal sentencing; correctional institutions and community-based models; and the youth justice system. Patterns of contact and conflict between various social groups and the criminal justice system are also examined.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090; or placement testing.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

CRM-135 Introduction to Canadian Law & Legal Institutions

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


An introduction to the fundamental principles or jurisprudence and the basic legal institutions of Canada. An examination of the history of Canadian law, the development of the Canadian constitution, the system of Canadian courts, and the roles and responsibilities of members of the legal profession. In addition, an analysis of the nature of legal reasoning, the doctrine of precedent, and the principles of statutory interpretation. Also introduces the fields of contract, torts, administrative law, and family law.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090; or placement testing.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

CRM-220 Research Methods in Criminology

3 Hours lecture, 3 credits


An introduction to criminological research. Topics include the purpose of scientific inquiry, research ethics, measurement of crime, survey research and experimental designs, data gathering, and a brief introduction to data analysis and reporting.


Prerequisite(s):

  • CRM 101 Minimum Grade C

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

CRM-230 Criminal Law

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


This course offers an intensive introduction to the nature, purpose, sources and basic principles of Canadian criminal law. It will include analysis of what constitutes a crime, the basis of criminal responsibility, and the common defences used in criminal law. Fundamental legal concepts will be highlighted. The course includes a short community practicum designed to help students to apply their developing understanding of criminal law to that which occurs in local area courts.


Prerequisite(s):

  • CRM 135 Minimum Grade C

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

CRM-241 Introduction to Corrections

3 Hours lecture, 3 credits


An introduction to the development and operation of correctional systems in Canada. Topics include the history of corrections, contemporary correctional institutions, relationships between inmates and staff, case management and treatment, community-based corrections, and life after prison.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, NIC ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG 098, ESL 090 or assessment.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

CRM-251 Introduction to Policing

3 Hours lecture, 3 credits


An introduction to the history, organization, structure, and operation of contemporary law enforcement agencies in Canada. Topics include the emergence of community policing, crime prevention, the recruitment and training of police officers, and occupational subculture.


Prerequisite(s):

  • CRM 131 Minimum Grade C

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

ENG-115 Essay Writing and Critical Analysis

3 hours lecture, or distance (D), 3 credits


ENG 115 involves the study of university level critical analysis and the production of expository and persuasive writing appropriate to university level discourse across the curriculum. A variety of rhetorical models are studied and practiced. Emphasis is placed on research, documentation and the writing of a research paper. Students may not receive credit for ENG 115 if they have previously completed ENG 116 or ENG 117.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 096, ENG 098, ESL 090, or ENG 160; or English assessment; or Academic IELTS overall score of 6.0 with band scores of 6.0 in Writing and Reading; or completion of ENG 104.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

ENG-116 Essay Writing & Indigenous Perspectives

3 hours lecture, or distance (D), 3 credits


ENG 116 introduces university-level research and writing in the humanities and social sciences and/or natural sciences with a specific focus on contemporary Indigenous issues in Canada. Students will critically analyze and study the writing, oral and aural practices of Indigenous scholars and teachers in a variety of disciplines and settings. Emphasis is placed on respecting and interweaving non-Indigenous and Indigenous ways of knowing and research methodologies in writing a post-secondary research paper. Students may not receive credit for ENG 116 if they have previously completed ENG 115, ENG 117 or ENG 125.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 098, ENG 096, ESL 090 or ENG 160; or English Assessment; or Academic IELTS overall score of 6.0 with band scores of 6.0 in Writing and Reading (Effective for the 2018/19 academic year); or completion of ENG 104.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

ENG-122 Reading Literature

3 hours lecture, or distance (D), 3 credits


In this course, you will become familiar with selected writers and their works and themes; develop and understanding of literary terms, techniques, and styles, and analyze fiction, drama, poetry and literary non-fiction using a range of critical approaches. The long-term objective of this course is to gain a greater understanding of yourself and others. You will, as Frederick Nietzsche commands, "Read...your own life and from this understanding the hieroglyphs of universal life!" Students may not receive credit for ENG 122 if they have previously taken ENG 120, ENG 121 or ENG 126.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C+ in Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090; or C in ENG 115, ENG 116, or ENG 117; or English Assessment; or Academic IELTS overall score of 6.0 with band scores of 6.5 in Writing and Reading (Effective for the 2018/19 academic year); or completion of ENG 104.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

ENG-127 Indigenous Literatures in Canada

3 hours lecture, or distance (D), 3 credits


English 127 introduces students to Indigenous literatures in Canada with emphasis on their historical, political, and cultural contexts. Students will study works selected from various genres, including story-telling, both oral and written, non-fiction writing, novels, short stories, drama, and poetry, as well as art, film, and digital media. They will learn to write reflective and scholarly analysis by interweaving Indigenous and Western approaches to textual interpretation and literary criticism. Students may not receive credit for ENG 127 if they have previously completed ENG 120, ENG 121 or ENG 126.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C+ in Provincial English 12, First Peoples English 12, ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG 098, ESL 090; or C in ENG 115, ENG 116, or ENG 117; or English Assessment; Academic IELTS overall score of 6.0 with band scores of 6.5 in Writing and Reading (Effective for the 2018/19 academic year); or completion of ENG 104.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

HIS-260 Historical Reactions to Criminal and Deviant Behaviour

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


Once upon a time, a shipwrecked sailor washed up upon distant shores. He wondered about where he was. Then he saw a scaffold and gallows. "Thank god, "he exhaled, "I am in a civilized country." What is the relationship between civilization, crime and punishment? Why have dead bodies been the symbol of law at some times and places but not at others? Why did criminal trials begin? How can we account for the replacement of torture and the "bloody scaffold" with the rise of the penitentiary? This course will ask such questions as it provides an historical perspective on changing definitions of deviancy, societal reactions to violent or criminal activity, and public policies to counteract prohibited behaviour. The time span and geographical range will be vast; we will range from the Mesopotamia of 3,000 BCE to 21st-century North America. To provide focus, the curriculum will be organized around four intensive case studies: Crime and Punishment in the Ancient Near East and Mediterranean; Early Modern and Industrial Britain; American Justice from Colonial Times to Court T.V.; and Reactions to Crime and Deviance in 19th and 20th Century Canada and British Columbia.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090; or placement testing.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

PHI-100 Introductory Philosophy: Knowledge & Reality

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


An introduction to selected problems in the philosophy of religion, metaphysics (theory of reality), and epistemology (theory of knowledge). Topics include the existence of God; the nature of mind and its relation to body; computers and consciousness; personal identity and mortality; freewill and determinism; the nature and sources of knowledge; and the justification of scientific beliefs.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090; or placement testing. PHI 100 may be taken before or after PHI 101.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

PHI-150 Critical Thinking

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


The course is designed to improve a fundamental ability needed for success in any discipline: the ability to think critically. The focus is on acquiring and sharpening the skills required for identifying, analyzing, and evaluating arguments. The emphasis is on reading and responding to a variety of real academic texts from across the curriculum. No specialized knowledge is presupposed. The course should make students more careful readers and more cogent writers.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090; or placement testing.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

POL-151 Law And Politics

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


This course is designed to provide an introduction to law, politics, public policy and the administration of justice in Canada. The study of the judicial system as a branch of government will be emphasized. The course will examine key provisions of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms as interpreted by the courts, with a particular focus upon those cases most directly connected to the administration of justice.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090; or placement testing.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

PSY-130 Introductory Psychology I

3 hours lecture, or distance (D), 3 credits


The course covers the following topics: research methods; biological bases of behaviour; consciousness; nature, nurture and diversity; development; sensation and perception; learning; and memory. Students are introduced to relevant psychological principles, theories and research findings, and are encouraged to develop an appreciation of the value of psychological research.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090; or placement testing.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

PSY-131 Introductory Psychology II

3 hours lecture, or distance (D), 3 credits


The course covers the following topics: research methods; thinking and language; intelligence; what drives us; emotions, stress and health; social psychology; personality; psychological disorders; therapy. Students are introduced to relevant psychological principles, theories and research findings, and are encouraged to develop an appreciation of the value of psychological research.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090; or placement testing. PSY 130 is not a prerequisite.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

PSY-218 Intro to Data Analysis in Psychology

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


The course is an introduction to quantitative data analysis. Both descriptive and inferential statistical techniques will be explored. Students will be introduced to probability theory as well as hypothesis testing. Students will be given a conceptual and practical understanding of data analysis techniques used in experimental research psychology.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Principles of Math 11, Applications of Math 12, Foundations of Math 11, Pre-Calculus 11 or MAT 053; or math assessment.
  • C in one of PSY 204, CRM 220, or SOC 220.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

PSY-260 Psychological Explanations of Criminal and Deviant Behaviour

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


The course introduces psychological perspectives on criminal behaviour, emphasizing theoretical and developmental issues, before considering specific crimes (e.g., white collar, domestic violence), and specific offender populations (e.g., sexual offenders, mentally disordered offenders). Students are introduced to relevant theories and research findings, and are encouraged to develop an appreciation of the value of psychological research. CRM 101, PSY 130 and PSY 131 are recommended.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090; or placement testing.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

SOC-110 Introduction to Sociology I

3 hours lecture or online, 3 credits


This course will introduce students to some of the major concepts, issues, and approaches in the discipline of sociology, including ethnicity, gender or sexuality. The course is designed to encourage the student to think more deeply about the relationship between personal troubles and public issues.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English Studies 12 or English First Peoples 12, ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090; or assessment.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

SOC-220 Introduction to Sociological Research Methods

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


This course introduces the student to the full range of sociological research methods. Students will learn basic qualitative and quantitative techniques, how to design research projects, conduct field research and surveys, apply basic statistical techniques and how to write a research report.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C+ in SOC 110 and SOC 111.
  • C+ in Principles of Math 11 or Pre-Calculus 11 or equivalent.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

SOC-230 Sociological Explanations of Crime & Deviance

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


This course surveys a full range of sociological perspectives on crime and deviance including the social disorganization perspective, functionalist and strain perspectives, subcultural and learning theories, interactionist and social control theories a well as conflict and critical theories.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C+ in SOC 110

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

STA-115 Introduction to Statistics

3 credits


This course introduces the basic concepts and techniques of descriptive and inferential statistics. It is designed to help students develop a working knowledge of statistics, as well as an awareness of the practical applications of statistics in diverse fields such as the biological and social sciences and business. Topics include: descriptive statistics, bivariate analysis, data collection, probability, random variables, sampling distribution of a statistic, estimation of a parameter and tests of hypotheses for one population, estimation and tests of hypotheses for two or more populations. Students will use statistics software to perform basic statistical data analysis.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Principles of Math 11, Precalculus 11, MAT 053, Applications of Math 12, Foundations of Math 11 or MAT 055.

For more information visit our timetable