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AQT-130 Aquaculture Practicum

3 credits


This course will provide each student with the opportunity to apply their learning with an industry employer at an aquaculture facility. With supervision, the students will learn to apply their knowledge and skills in the husbandry of finfish or shellfish in either freshwater or seawater production sites. In particular, the participant will have the opportunity to perform specific tasks such as water quality monitoring and record keeping, fish handling, feeding and health management of fish, disinfection/biosecurity, mortality removal and coding, emergency response, including health and safety, the equipment and site infrastructure operation, and maintenance and other activities common in daily routine of a commercial aquaculture facility.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to the Aquaculture Technician Certificate Program.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

AQT-201 Biology of Cultured Finfish

3 credits


This course provides an overview of several major biological concepts, with an emphasis on the biology of salmonid species utilized in the aquaculture industry. The course covers topics on taxonomy and diversity, anatomy, organ systems, reproduction, life cycle, life history and migration patten, physiology, ecology, and genetics as they relate to aquaculture.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to Aquaculture Technician Diploma program.

For more information visit our timetable

AQT-202 Aquaculture Equipment and Facility Maintenance

3 credits


This course will introduce students to the operation and maintenance of aquaculture facilities and equipment. This course also includes technical mathematical skills and use of MS Excel as applied to physical, chemical and biological aspects of the daily operations in an aquaculture farm site. Basic concepts in aquaculture engineering will be introduced as related to operations and management of specific hatchery facilities and farm sites such as basic systems including electrical, plumbing, water supply, drainage, aeration, and recirculating aquaculture systems. Knowledge and skills on the use of "Fishtalk" and "AquaManager" for data entry and analysis of data in the day to day farm site operations will be introduced. Aquaculture safety and health will be reviewed and student will gain hands on experience with operation and maintenance of equipment used at aquaculture facilities.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to Aquaculture Technician Diploma program.

For more information visit our timetable

AQT-204 Finfish Grow-out Production

4 credits


This course focuses on salmonid husbandry techniques and principles that include feeds and feeding (nutrition), fish health and biosecurity, development and growth, physiological requirements, fish handling, environmental monitoring, and culture facilities. Management of salmonids from smolt to marketable size and harvesting procedures will be emphasized. Advances in salmonid culture and application of biotechnology to improve production will be discussed.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to Aquaculture Technician Diploma program.

For more information visit our timetable

AQT-206 Fish Diseases and Health


This course covers health and diseases of salmonids from the perspective of the cultured fish, the pathogen, and the environment. Major viral, bacterial, fungal, and parasitic diseases of aquatic species are studied; and pathogen characteristics, epidemiology, prevention, control and management are investigated. Biosecurity protocols are emphasized. Also included are: sea lice identification and monitoring; and advanced Harmful Algal Monitoring Program (HAMP) training.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to Aquaculture Technician Diploma program.

For more information visit our timetable

BIO-060 Concepts in Biology I (Inhabiting the Human Body)

3 hours lecture and 3 hours lab, online, or distance (D) with attendance at a Campus Lab is required.


An introduction to biological science containing similar material to that of BC Biology 12. This course covers scientific methods and principles, cell biology, genetics, and human anatomy and physiology.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C+ in English 11, ENG 052. English 12 is highly recommended. It is also recommended students have CHE 051 or Chemistry 11, although this is not required.
  • Take BIO-060L

For more information visit our timetable

BIO-102 Principles of Modern Biology II

3 hours lecture and 3 hours lab, 3 credits


This is one of a pair of biology courses for science majors that introduce students to the biological concepts necessary to continue into second-year biology. This course is designed to provide students with a general survey of major areas of biology. Topics include ecology, evolution, cell division, genetics, DNA and genes, classification and diversity. The course includes extensive laboratory components.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Biology 11, Biology 12, BIO 051, BIO 060 or BIO 110.
  • C in one of Chemistry 11 or CHE 051
  • Take BIO 102L

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

BIO-103 Principles of Modern Biology 1

3 hours lecture + 3 hour lab, 3 credits


This is one of a pair of biology course for science majors that introduce students to the biological concepts necessary to continue into secondy-year biology. This is designed to provide students with a general survey of major areas of biology. Topics include biological chemistry, cellular organization and respiration, photosynthesis, and plant and animal structure and function. The course includes an extensive laboratory component.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Biology 11, Biology 12, BIO 060 or BIO 110.
  • C in one of Chemistry 11 or CHE 051.
  • Take BIO 103L

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

BIO-110 Concepts of Biology I (Inhabiting the Human Body)

3 hours lecture + 3 hours lab, 3 credits


This course, containing similar material to that of BC Biology 12 and meeting the same requirements of BIO 060, is designed for non-science majors who require a science elective, or science students without the necessary prerequisites for BIO 102/BIO 103 and/ or BIO 160/161. Topics include an introduction to concepts in cell biology beginning with basic concepts in chemistry, cell structure, cell energetics, cell division and genetics. The last part of the course will focus on human anatomy and physiology. Throughout the course the connection between topics covered and human health will be emphasized.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C+ in English 11, ENG 052 or placement testing. English 12 highly recommended. It is also recommended students have CHE 051 or Chemistrty 11, although this is not required.
  • Take BIO 110L

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

BIO-111 Concepts in Biology II (Inhabiting the Earth)

3 hours lecture + 3 hours lab, 3 credits


This course is designed for non-science students who require a science elective, or science students without the necessary prerequisites for Biology 102 and 103. Topics include a brief review of cell division and genetics to provide a grounding for the discussion of evolution. The course will also provide an introduction to the diversity of life with investigations into the evolution of plant and animal structure and function. Finally, basic concepts in ecology will be introduced to provide a grounding for the discussion of current environmental issues.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090; or placement testing.
  • Take BIO-111L

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

BIO-159 Human Anatomy & Physiology fr Prac Nurs

lecture, 5 credits


This course gives an overview of the structure and function of 10 body systems. It also discusses various health promotion strategies that work toward optimal function of these systems.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in Biology 12 or BIO 060 or equivalent completed within 10 years.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

BIO-160 Human Anatomy & Physiology I

3 hours lecture + 3 hours lab, 3 credits


This course is the first half of a comprehensive survey of human structure and functions. Topics include: biochemistry, cell biology, genetics, and the anatomy and physiology of the integumentary musculoskeletal, nervous and endocrine systems. An extensive laboratory component is included.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C+ in Biology 12, BIO 060 or BIO-110.
  • C+ in Chemistry 11 or CHE 051. Biology and Chemistry prerequisites must have been completed within the last 10 years.
  • Take BIO-160L

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

BIO-161 Human Anatomy & Physiology II

3 hours lecture + 3 hours lab, 3 credits


This course is the continuation and completion of the comprehensive survey of human structures and functions started in Human Anatomy and Physiology I. It includes an extensive laboratory component.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in BIO 160
  • Take BIO-161L

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

BIO-170 Foundations of Ethnobotany

3 hours lecture + 3 hours lab, 3 credits


Foundations of Ethnobotany provides students with a broad survey of the major areas of study within the discipline of ethnobotany. Topics include: folk taxonomy, plant identification and ecology, origins of agriculture, traditional foodways, phytomedicinals, fibre technologies, and plants and community. Global indigenous experiences will be used to illustrate course material and when possible, examples from Pacific Northwest cultures will be included. The laboratory component of this course illustrates and further explores lecture topics.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, NIC ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG 098, ESL-090, or placement testing.
  • Take BIO-170L

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

BIO-200 Cell Biology

3 hours lecture + 3 hours lab, 3 credits


A study of the ultrastructure and function of cell organelles and membranes, DNA and chromosomes, cellular movements and cellular reproduction.


Prerequisite(s):

  • BIO 102, BIO 103, CHE 110 and CHE 111 Minimum Grade C
  • Take BIO-200L

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

BIO-201 Introduction to Biochemistry

3 hours lecture + 1.5 hours tutorial, 3 credits (may be offered in alternate years)


This course provides an introduction to structural and functional aspects of cell chemistry. Topics include biological molecules and their relationships, protein structure, enzyme action, energy transfer, metabolic processes and control mechanisms.


Prerequisite(s):

  • BIO 102/BIO 103 and CHE 200/201 (which may be taken concurrently) Minimum Grade C
  • Take CHE-201

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

BIO-202 Principles of Genetics

3 hours lecture + 1.5 hours tutorial, 3 credits(may be offered in alternate years)


A study of the principles and mechanisms of inheritance, including an analysis of transmission genetics, the nature and function of the genetic material, molecular genetics and population genetics.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in BIO 102 and BIO 103.
  • C in CHE 110 and CHE 111.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

BIO-211 Invertebrate Biology

Scheduled lecture and Lab (3 hours/week) or distance (1.5 hours tutorial via MITV) with lab sessions arranged with instructor, 3 credits(may be offered in alternate years)


An introduction to the major invertebrate taxa from sponges to chordates with emphasis on functional anatomy, life-cycles, evolution, diversity and ecology. A compulsory 3-day field trip to the West Coast of Vancouver Island is an integral part of this course. Lab work involves first hand and microscopic observations of living animals with some dissections. Field work involves observations of intertidal and subtidal invertebrate individuals and their community ecology.


Prerequisite(s):

  • BIO 102 and 103 or BIO 110 and 111 Minimum Grade C
  • Take BIO-211L

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

BIO-215 Introductory Microbiology

3 hours lecture,3 hours lab, 3 credits


This is an introduction to the field of microbiology. Topics covered include: prokaryotic cell structure and function; microbial growth, factors affecting growth, and control of growth; microbial metabolism; prokaryotic genetics and gene regulation; microbial classification and diversity; and, viruses. Specific skills learned in the laboratory include: sterile technique, bacterial culture, microscopy and staining, serial dilution, bacterial metabolism, fecal coliform testing, and antimicrobial agents in the control of microbial growth.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Bio 102/103 or Bio 160/161 or Bio 110/111 Minimum Grade C
  • Take BIO-215L

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

BIO-230 Principles of Ecology

3 hours lecture , 3 hours lab, 3 credits


An introduction to the basic principles of ecology. BIO 230 explores the physical components of the environment, adaptations of organisms to the physical environment and how elements of the environment influence the distribution and abundance of organisms. Community structure and dynamics, ecosystem energetics, nutrient cycles, and biological interactions at the population, community, and ecosystem levels are examines. The lab series offers students hands-on opportunities to study natural systems and practice several sampling techniques. The majority of the labs take place in an outdoor setting and may include a 2-day field trip during a weekend.


Prerequisite(s):

  • BIO 102 & BIO 103 or BIO 110 & BIO 111. Minimum Grade C STA 115 or MAT 115 is strongly recommended
  • Take BIO-230L

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

BIO-241 Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK)

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


This course will explore Traditional Ecological Knowledge (TEK) as it relates to contemporary health and environmental issues with particular emphasis on topics relevant to First Nations people of Vancouver Island and the adjacent mainland. Students who do not meet course prerequisites but have life or work experience that would qualify them to enrol in this course are encouraged to contact the instructor.


Prerequisite(s):

  • BIO 102 and BIO 103 or BIO 110 and BIO 111 or BIO 170 and BIO 171 Minimum Grade C

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

BIO-250 Directed Independent Studies in BiologyPLA

3 credits


This course provides the student with an opportunity to carry out independent research under supervision of a Departmental faculty member. The course is designed for students who have completed 1st year Biology. The main content of the study will be the practical aspects of carrying our independent research and may include three or more of the following activities, mutually agreed upon by both student and faculty supervisor: formulate a research question; collect relevant background literature; write a literature review; prepare a grant question; carry out research independently; collate and interpret results; formulate logical and reasonable conclusions regarding the experiment. The student may choose to work on a project or research topic that relates to research currently ongoing at the College.


Prerequisite(s):

  • BIO 102 and BIO 103 or BIO 110 and 111; CHE 110 and 111; STA 115 or MAT 115 Minimum Grade C

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

BIO-260 Pathobiology I

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


This course is the first half of an overview of basic health science. It provides an introduction to the principles of pathophysiology, microbiology, immunology, pharmacology, and nutrition relevant to nursing. The focus is on concepts and mechanisms, with prototype diseases and prototype drugs given as examples. A series of assignments provides opportunities to investigate other diseases that may be encountered in the clinical area.


Prerequisite(s):

  • BIO 161 and enrolment in the 2nd year Nursing Program Minimum Grade C

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

BIO-261 Pathobiology II

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


This course is the continuation and completion of the introduction to the principles of pathophysiology, microbiology, immunology, pharmacology, and nutrition started in Pathobiology I. Again, the focus is on concepts and mechanisms, with prototype diseases and prototype drugs given as examples.


Prerequisite(s):

  • BIO 260 and enrolment in the 2nd year Nursing Program Minimum Grade C

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

CAMP-MDSC Mad Scientist Youth Camp


Campers, strap on your safety goggles and prepare to partake in hands on experiments and laboratory demonstrations in this week long camp! Children (ages 10 to 13) can join this camp to expand on their knowledge of the wacky world of science! Campers will explore optics in physics, forces/strength of material in engineering, gooey reactions in chemistry, wonders of life in biology and the basics of coding. A good time will be had by all!


For more information visit our timetable

CFW-104 Forest Ecology 1

4 credits


This course provides an introduction to forest ecology. Emphasis will be given to tree and flora identification, BC's Biogeoclimatic Ecosystem Classification (BEC), and wildlife habitat management. In this course students will explore how climate, geography, water and soils influence the forest ecosystem's form and function.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to the Coastal Forest Worker Certificate program

For more information visit our timetable

CMH-165 Concepts for Mental Health Practice II

4 credits


This course will introduce the learner to the role of the Community Mental Health Worker in the delivery of mental health service. The Mental Health Act, ethical issues, and the history of mental illness will be discussed. The course focuses on the various concepts related to common mental health issues, including neurobiology, the DSM-5, various mental disorders, treatment modalities, and addictions. Assessment tools will also be discussed as well as intervention techniques.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission into the Community Mental Health Worker Program

For more information visit our timetable

ENG-107 Introduction to Creative Writing: Fiction & Non-Fiction

3 hours/week, 3 credits


ENG 107 is a first year writing seminar focusing on method and craft in fiction and creative non-fiction. Fiction writing may include short stories or novel writing. Non-fiction may include creative essay writing, documentary, life-writing or biography. Students create a portfolio of work including both fiction and creative non-fiction. This seminar focuses on the practice of writing with an emphasis on learning the craft of writing through discussions, exercises and peer critiquing.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090; or placement testing; or portfolio.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

ENG-207 Creative Non-Fiction

3 hours seminar, 3 credits


ENG 207 is a second year university studies writing workshop that explores the method and craft of creative writing with a focus on creative non-fiction, including creative essay writing, documentary writing, travel writing, life-writing and biography. Students will create a portfolio of work.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C+ in one of the following: English 107, 108, 115, 120, 121, 125, 126, or by portfolio with instructor permission

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

ENG-230 Selected Topics in Literature

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


For 2019 Fall, the topic is narrative and digital media. This course introduces the function of narrative and examines narrative method in a variety of genres such as poetry, fiction, drama, biography, autobiography, essay, film, and textbook. The focus of study will vary according to instructor interest and may include themes such as love and sex, war, crime, death, family, or social justice. Students will be introduced to narratology and will examine the ways in which narrative structures shape understanding of the self and the world.


Prerequisite(s):

  • B in English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 096, ENG 098, ESL 090, or C in one first-year university transfer English.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

GEO-111 Environment, Society and Sustainability

Distance (D), 3 credits


This course focuses on the complex relationships between people and the environment. It provides an introduction to how the biosphere functions, examines the impacts of human activities and resource exploitation on the environment, and considers the potential for a sustainable society. Topics covered include; energy flow, biogeochemical cycles, ecosystem structure and dynamics, climate change, water resources, marine resources, biodiversity loss, protected areas and endangered species, human population growth, ecological footprint analysis, and environmental world-views.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090; or assessment.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

GEO-214 Biogeography

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


This course examines the changes in the geographic distribution patterns of plants and animals over geologic time. The attributes of the life layer involved in these shifting relationships are investigated from the geographic perspective. Sampling concepts, methods and tools of analysis are introduced. Some of the topics covered are: the basics of a functioning life layer, feedback in natural systems, disturbance and succession, interpreting distribution patterns, changing continents and climate, colonization, dispersal and invasion, genetic modification, extinctions, conservation and conservation planning.


Prerequisite(s):

  • GEO 105 or GEO 106 or GEO 111 Minimum Grade C

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

HTC-100 Fish Stock Enhancement And Stewardship

4 credits


This course encompasses the biological and ecological principles which are essential to the fish stock enhancement, protection and management within the aquatic environment of any given region. Students will be introduced to existing enhancement programs and the status of fish stock enhancement needs at a regional level while learning of national and international initiatives.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in English 10; or C in two of Composition 10, Creative Writing 10, Literary Studies 10, New Media 10, Spoken Language 10, English First Peoples Writing 10, English First Peoples Literary Studies 10, English First Peoples New Media 10, English First Peoples Spoken Language 10, or NIC ENG-035, or C+ in Communications 12, or C+ in ESL 062 and 065; or successful NIC assessment testing in English; and C in one of Principles of Math 10, Apprenticeship & Workplace Math 10, Workplace Math 10, Foundations of Math & Pre-Calculus 10, Applications of Math 11, NIC MAT-029, or successful NIC assessment testing in math.

For more information visit our timetable

HTC-101 Biology of Wild Fish

4 credits


This course encompasses theory and applied learning on the identification of various fish species including lessons specific to the external and internal anatomy of fish. Emphasis will be given to fish life cycles, migration, ecology and physiology in relation to growth, reproduction and osmoregulation.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in English 10; or C in two of Composition 10, Creative Writing 10, Literary Studies 10, New Media 10, Spoken Language 10, English First Peoples Writing 10, English First Peoples Literary Studies 10, English First Peoples New Media 10, English First Peoples Spoken Language 10, or NIC ENG-035, or C+ in Communications 12, or C+ in ESL 062 and 065; or successful NIC assessment testing in English; and C in one of Principles of Math 10, Apprenticeship & Workplace Math 10, Workplace Math 10, Foundations of Math & Pre-Calculus 10, Applications of Math 11, NIC MAT-029, or successful NIC assessment testing in math.

For more information visit our timetable

LHC-130 Understanding Soil


Horticulturists need to understand physical, biological and chemical properties of soils and their effects on plant growth. Students in this course will examine soil and soil-less media samples to learn about their qualities, profiles and chemical characteristics.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to the Landscape Horticulture Fundamentals Certificate Program

For more information visit our timetable

NUR-213 Professional Practice III: Nursing Ethics

3 hours seminar, 3 credits


Building on previous Relational Practice and Professional Practice courses, this course focuses on the growing body of knowledge related to nursing ethics. Beginning with an understanding of bio-medical ethics that have dominated nursing ethics in the past and moving to an understanding of developing ethical theory related to nursing and nursing issues, participants will have opportunities to explore nursing ethics in the context of their nursing practice.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Successful completion of Term 3

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

PSY-130 Introductory Psychology I

3 hours lecture, or distance (D), 3 credits


The course covers the following topics: research methods; biological bases of behaviour; consciousness; nature, nurture and diversity; development; sensation and perception; learning; and memory. Students are introduced to relevant psychological principles, theories and research findings, and are encouraged to develop an appreciation of the value of psychological research.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090; or placement testing.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

PSY-202 Health Psychology

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


This course studies a variety of factors involving health and illness from a bio-psychosocial perspective. Topics include behaviours that affect health such as diet, exercise, stress and substance abuse. The impact of chronic and acute illness on the individual and the social support systems are also covered.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C+ in 1st year English and PSY 130 & 131

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

PSY-215 Biological Psychology

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


An introduction to the biological bases of behaviour and mental functioning. Topics include neural structure, neural communication, motor and sensory processes, brain structure and function, rhythms and sleep, and regulation of internal body states. The biological basis for emotions, learning, and memory will be covered.


Prerequisite(s):

  • PSY 130 & PSY 131 with minimum Grade C or an introductory college level biology course is strongly recommended but not required.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

PSY-235 Abnormal Psychology

3 hours lecture, or distance (D), 3 credits


The course covers selected disorders listed in the current version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), focusing on the nature of each disorder, biopsychosocial explanations of each disorder, and relevant treatments. Legal and ethical issues are also addressed. Students are introduced to relevant psychological theories and research findings, and are encouraged to develop an appreciation of the value of psychological research.


Prerequisite(s):

  • PSY 130 & 131 Minimum Grade C

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

SFQ-101 Shellfish Diseases And Biosecurity

3 credits


This course introduces students to important diseases affecting growth and survival of the stock, as well as measures taken to protect the health of consumers. The course will focus on biosecurity including the detection of common microbial diseases of filter-feeding molluscan shellfish to protect the health of human consumers. Identification and monitoring of Harmful Algal Bloom organisms will be presented.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of English 10, Composition 10, Creative Writing 10, Literary Studies 10, New Media 10, Spoken Language 10, English First Peoples Writing 10, English First Peoples Literary Studies 10, English First Peoples New Media 10, English First Peoples Spoken Language 10, or NIC ENG-035, or C+ in Communications 12, or C+ in ESL 062 and 065; or successful NIC assessment testing in English; and C in one of Principles of Math 10, Apprenticeship & Workplace Math 10, Workplace Math 10, Foundations of Math & Pre-Calculus 10, Applications of Math 11, NIC MAT-029, or successful NIC assessment testing in math.

For more information visit our timetable

SFQ-103 Innovations in Shellfish Aquaculture Production

3 credits


This course explores the latest innovations to improve "seedling" production using biotechnology including an introduction to genetic manipulation and the mass-production of nutritious microalgae. Innovative techniques available in the market, such as genomics for detection of microbial pathogens, will be discussed.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of English 10, Composition 10, Creative Writing 10, Literary Studies 10, New Media 10, Spoken Language 10, English First Peoples Writing 10, English First Peoples Literary Studies 10, English First Peoples New Media 10, English First Peoples Spoken Language 10, or NIC ENG-035, or C+ in Communications 12, or C+ in ESL 062 and 065; or successful NIC assessment testing in English; and C in one of Principles of Math 10, Apprenticeship & Workplace Math 10, Workplace Math 10, Foundations of Math & Pre-Calculus 10, Applications of Math 11, NIC MAT-029, or successful NIC assessment testing in math.

For more information visit our timetable

SSW-209 Contemporary Perspectives on Substance Abuse

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


This course prepares students to work with clients who have addictions problems. Skills and knowledge related to the management and understanding of addiction related problems and explores the biopsychosocial spiritual theory of addiction. Further, this course examines the transtheoretical model of change, history of substance abuse, pattern of use and the impact of addictions on society and selected populations.


Prerequisite(s):

  • SSW 150 or EA/CS Certificate or equivalent

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

STA-115 Introduction to Statistics

3 credits


This course introduces the basic concepts and techniques of descriptive and inferential statistics. It is designed to help students develop a working knowledge of statistics, as well as an awareness of the practical applications of statistics in diverse fields such as the biological and social sciences and business. Topics include: descriptive statistics, bivariate analysis, data collection, probability, random variables, sampling distribution of a statistic, estimation of a parameter and tests of hypotheses for one population, estimation and tests of hypotheses for two or more populations. Students will use statistics software to perform basic statistical data analysis.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Principles of Math 11, Precalculus 11, MAT 053, Applications of Math 12, Foundations of Math 11 or MAT 055.

For more information visit our timetable