Search Results

ABT-111 Administrative Procedures

Online, 1.5 credits


This course enables students to develop essential organizational skills and efficient office practices for today's dynamic offices. Topics include time management, safety and ergonomics, information resources, mail services, travel arrangements, meeting coordination, office technologies, telephone practices, appointment scheduling, and banking procedures.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Take ABT 020.
  • Take ABT 100, ABT 116 and ABT 148.
  • English prerequisite for Applied Business Technology Program.

For more information visit our timetable

ABT-147 Business Calculators & Mathematics

Online, 1.5 credits


This course teaches computational skills using the electronic calculator. Students will learn the touch method, common features of the calculator, and solve basic business mathematics problems using the most efficient and accurate techniques possible.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Take ABT 020.

For more information visit our timetable

ABT-149 Business Communications

Online, 2 credits


Business Communications teaches you how to plan, organize, and write correct and effective "reader friendly" business documents. You will learn how to write business letters, memos, reports, and electronic messages.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Take ABT 020.
  • Take ABT 100, ABT 116 and ABT 148.
  • English prerequisite for Applied Business Technology Program.

For more information visit our timetable

ABT-175 Conveyancing Procedures I

Online, 2 credits


This course introduces the student to the roles and responsibilities of a legal administrative assistant employed in the field of conveyancing in British Columbia. Topics include systems of land registration, land title searches, contracts of purchase and sale, statements of adjustments, and the execution and registration of electronic documents filed in Land Title Offices. The course focuses on the purchaser's procedures for a simple conveyance not involving financing.


Prerequisite(s):

  • English prerequisite for ABT Program, ABT 020, ABT 101, ABT 117, ABT 148, ABT 170, ABT 171, or equivalents.

For more information visit our timetable

ABT-185 Medical Administrative Procedures

Online, 2 credits


This 12-week course is designed to introduce the student to the administrative duties and procedures required in a medical office/hospital setting. Topics covered include reception skills, appointment scheduling, telephone techniques, interpersonal skills, stress management, inventory control, mail processing, records management procedures, financial records, privacy and confidentiality issues, and medical ethics.


Prerequisite(s):

  • English prerequisite for Applied Business Technology Program

For more information visit our timetable

ACL-012 Ware Washing & Service

1 credit


This course will focus on proper procedures for ware washing and sanitizing of all kitchen equipment, bussing and serving techniques. Instruction will include mechanical and 3-sink ware washing, correct methods of sanitizing for each, cleaning and sanitizing "in-place" equipment and correct storage of sanitized dishes, cutlery & equipment. You will also learn proper customer interaction and dealing with minor complaints.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to Employment Transition/Culinary Assist. Program

For more information visit our timetable

ACL-014 Kitchen Basics

2 credits


This course provides instruction in procedures for receiving and storing food, knife skills and cutting techniques, portioning and measuring, safe handling and operation of industrial and small kitchen equipment, kitchen organization and roles and responsibilities.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to Employment Transition/Culinary Assist. Program

For more information visit our timetable

ACL-016 Basic Food Preparation

3 credits


Learners will develop a set of basic cooking skills for the professional kitchen. Skills include cooking methods, stocks, thickening agents,soups, basic sauces, sandwiches, salads and dressings, breakfast cookery, vegetable and starch cooking, quick breads, cookies, pies and pastries. Students will practice herb gardening for kitchen use and will be able to identify and recognize quality traits of common herbs and spices and correctly use them in cooking.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to Employment Transition/Culinary Assist. Program

For more information visit our timetable

ACL-030 Math Measurement & Money Skills for Work

1 credit


This course is designed to introduce learners to math, measurement, and portioning skills used in the kitchen. Budgeting, money management, and purchasing food items are also covered.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to Employment Transition/Culinary Assist. Program

For more information visit our timetable

ACN-031 Introduction to Construction 2

120 hrs, 3 credits


This course teaches some of the basic skills that every construction laborer should have. It covers new constructions and demolition. The class is mostly hands-on learning with an emphasis on safety.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to Employment Transition/Construction Access Program

For more information visit our timetable

AED-053 Schedule, Clock and Calendar Skills

1 credit


This course will provide students with the opportunity to enhance understanding and use of time & clocks, calendars, and various schedules.


For more information visit our timetable

AQT-100 Introduction to Aquaculture

3 credits


This course will put regional aquaculture into a global context. The importance of aquaculture in addressing growing seafood security issues will be outlined and the production approaches and future trends will be reviewed. As an overview course, students will examine various aquaculture production approaches with a focus on those of other regions - tropical, marine, freshwater, etc. A regular component of this course will be a review and discussion of current events, developments and innovations as they relate to aquaculture.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to the Aquaculture Technician Certificate program.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

AQT-105 Shellfish and Algal Production

3 credits


This course provides an overview of the production approaches used in the shellfish aquaculture sector. Topics include seed transport, juvenile rearing systems (e.g., Floating Upweller System (FLUPSY) design and function), production systems (raft, longlines, beach), containment structures (nets, trays), farm siting, production planning, growing water and product quality monitoring and husbandry protocols such as grading, tumbling, beach hardening, predator protection, and gear fouling management. In addition, system maintenanc is covered, including anchoring, materials use/life cycle, and other Standard Operating Protocols (SOP's)will be reviewed. Algal production of seaweeds and microalgae will be discussed.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to the Aquaculture Technician Certificate program.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

AQT-110 Finfish Husbandry

3 credits


This course provides an overview of the production approaches used in the finfish aquaculture sector. Following a review of the various production systems used for finfish production and the environmental conditions appropriate for farm siting, topics associated with farm operations will include feeding systems and protocols, production planning, finfish health practices, stocking density, grading, weight samples, harvest procedures, finfish transport, and fish processing.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to the Aquaculture Technician Certificate Program.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

AQT-125 Aquaculture Field School

3 credits


This course will provide each student with the of fish culture in a mock up facility. Students will gain hands-on experience in fish culture that includes incubating fertilized eggs, culturing larvae, feeding juveniles, monitoring development and growth rate, calibrating scientific equipment and meters, measuring important water parameters, managing a system and communicating with team members, and performing daily system checks. Students will also have the opportunity to visit aquaculture facilities of collaborating aquaculture industry partners and government agencies including Fisheries and Oceans Canada.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to the Aquaculture Technician Certificate program.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

AQT-200 Sustainable Aquaculture

3 credits


This course discusses important issues related to the effect of aquaculture to the environment, economy and society. The scope encompasses ecological interactions between aquaculture and the environment from local to ecosystem scales, including current issues, comparison of systems, species, production methods, environments, and socioeconomics. In addition, a variety of Canadian aquaculture sustainability approaches will be discussed including regulations, permits, certifications, and fish health management plans.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to Aquaculture Technician Diploma program.

For more information visit our timetable

AQT-202 Aquaculture Equipment and Facility Maintenance

3 credits


This course will introduce students to the operation and maintenance of aquaculture facilities and equipment. This course also includes technical mathematical skills and use of MS Excel as applied to physical, chemical and biological aspects of the daily operations in an aquaculture farm site. Basic concepts in aquaculture engineering will be introduced as related to operations and management of specific hatchery facilities and farm sites such as basic systems including electrical, plumbing, water supply, drainage, aeration, and recirculating aquaculture systems. Knowledge and skills on the use of "Fishtalk" and "AquaManager" for data entry and analysis of data in the day to day farm site operations will be introduced. Aquaculture safety and health will be reviewed and student will gain hands on experience with operation and maintenance of equipment used at aquaculture facilities.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to Aquaculture Technician Diploma program.

For more information visit our timetable

AQT-205 Finfish Hatchery Production

4 credits


This course focuses on general salmonid hatchery production techniques and principles. Broodstock development, salmonid reproduction, egg incubation, alevin rearing, parr culture, smoltification, vaccination, and sea site transfer are examined in this context including the control of hatchery conditions to maintain optimal fish health at early life stages. Salmonid hatchery production system and management are highlighted.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to Aquaculture Technician Diploma program.

For more information visit our timetable

ASM-102 Structural Materials & Heat Treatment

32 hours


This course provides an introduction to the technology of materials. Content includes the chemical and physical nature of matter, the types of materials used in aircraft structures and their identification, and how to evaluate their condition. Also included is an introduction to treatments of metals including heat treatment, annealing and hardening.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to the Aircraft Structures Technician Program

For more information visit our timetable

BIO-103 Principles of Modern Biology 1

3 hours lecture + 3 hour lab, 3 credits


This is one of a pair of biology course for science majors that introduce students to the biological concepts necessary to continue into secondy-year biology. This is designed to provide students with a general survey of major areas of biology. Topics include biological chemistry, cellular organization and respiration, photosynthesis, and plant and animal structure and function. The course includes an extensive laboratory component.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Biology 11, Biology 12, BIO 060 or BIO 110.
  • C in one of Chemistry 11 or CHE 051.
  • Take BIO 103L

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

BIO-110 Concepts of Biology I (Inhabiting the Human Body)

3 hours lecture + 3 hours lab, 3 credits


This course, containing similar material to that of BC Biology 12 and meeting the same requirements of BIO 060, is designed for non-science majors who require a science elective, or science students without the necessary prerequisites for BIO 102/BIO 103 and/ or BIO 160/161. Topics include an introduction to concepts in cell biology beginning with basic concepts in chemistry, cell structure, cell energetics, cell division and genetics. The last part of the course will focus on human anatomy and physiology. Throughout the course the connection between topics covered and human health will be emphasized.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C+ in English 11, ENG 052 or placement testing. English 12 highly recommended. It is also recommended students have CHE 051 or Chemistrty 11, although this is not required.
  • Take BIO 110L

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

BIO-160 Human Anatomy & Physiology I

3 hours lecture + 3 hours lab, 3 credits


This course is the first half of a comprehensive survey of human structure and functions. Topics include: biochemistry, cell biology, genetics, and the anatomy and physiology of the integumentary musculoskeletal, nervous and endocrine systems. An extensive laboratory component is included.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C+ in Biology 12, BIO 060 or BIO-110.
  • C+ in Chemistry 11 or CHE 051. Biology and Chemistry prerequisites must have been completed within the last 10 years.
  • Take BIO-160L

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

BIO-201 Introduction to Biochemistry

3 hours lecture + 1.5 hours tutorial, 3 credits (may be offered in alternate years)


This course provides an introduction to structural and functional aspects of cell chemistry. Topics include biological molecules and their relationships, protein structure, enzyme action, energy transfer, metabolic processes and control mechanisms.


Prerequisite(s):

  • BIO 102/BIO 103 and CHE 200/201 (which may be taken concurrently) Minimum Grade C
  • Take CHE-201

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

BUS-265 Retail Management

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


This topic is approached from a strategic perspective and examines several types of retail institutions and strategy options. Other topics include trading area analysis and management functions related to human resources, operations management, merchandising, retail image, and financial and pricing management.


Prerequisite(s):

  • BUS 162 Minimum Grade C

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

BUS-390 Directed Field Studies I

15 hours seminar + directed work term, 3 credits


As the first of two field study courses in the Bachelor of Business Administration Program, the primary goal of this course is to give students an opportunity to apply theories and methods learned in the classroom to the analysis of actual business problems encountered within the context of a supervised related work placement. While employed, students will complete assigned readings, applied research assignments, and a work-related field study project carried out under the supervision of an academic advisor.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Successful completion of 30 credits of business or university transfer courses, including 3 credits of first year English.
  • Must have a position - paid or non-paid - with a faculty-approved employer prior to the start date.

For more information visit our timetable

CAMP-MDSC Mad Scientist Youth Camp


Campers, strap on your safety goggles and prepare to partake in hands on experiments and laboratory demonstrations in this week long camp! Children (ages 10 to 13) can join this camp to expand on their knowledge of the wacky world of science! Campers will explore optics in physics, forces/strength of material in engineering, gooey reactions in chemistry, wonders of life in biology and the basics of coding. A good time will be had by all!


For more information visit our timetable

CHE-051 College Preparatory Chemistry I

3 hours lecture + 3 hours lab, or distance with attendance at campus labs required 3 credits


College Preparatory Chemistry I is designed to provide students with the equivalent of Grade 11 Chemistry. The content of the course includes: nature of matter, mole concept, chemical reactions, atomic theory, solution chemistry and organic chemistry.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C+ in one of Math 10, Foundations of Math and Precalculus 10 or MAT 034.
  • Take CHE-051L

For more information visit our timetable

CHE-060 College Preparatory Chemistry II

3 hours lecture + 3 hours lab, 3 credits


College Preparatory Chemistry II is designed to provide students with the equivalent of Grade 12 Chemistry. The content of the course includes: gas laws, thermochemistry, reaction rates, chemical equilibrium, acids and bases, redox reactions and electrochemistry.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C+ in one of Principles of Math 11, Pre Calculus 11, Applications of Math 12 or MAT 053.
  • C+ in one of Chemistry 11 or CHE 051.
  • Take CHE-060L

For more information visit our timetable

CHE-110 Chemical Principles I

3 hours lecture + 3 hours lab, 3 credits


CHE 110 and 111, Chemical Principles I and II, are 1st-year university-level foundation courses in chemistry designed as essential prerequisites to further courses in chemistry. CHE 110 includes an introduction to chemical reactions and equations, energy in chemical systems, and the structures and properties of atoms, molecules, gases, liquids, solids, and solutions.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C+ in Chemistry 12 or CHE 060. Physics 11 and PHY 050 is strongly recommended.
  • C in one of Principles of Math 12, Pre Calculus 12, MAT 067 or MAT 060.
  • Take CHE-110L

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

CHE-111 Chemical Principles II

3 hours lecture + 3 hours lab, 3 credits


CHE 111 deals with chemical kinetics, gaseous and aqueous equilibria, chemical thermodynamics, electrochemistry and organic chemistry (structure, nomenclature, functional groups, stereochemistry, substitution reactions). Laboratory work illustrates theoretical concepts and develops laboratory skills and techniques.


Prerequisite(s):

  • CHE 110 Minimum Grade C
  • Take CHE-111L

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

CHE-200 Organic Chemistry I

3 hours lecture + 4 hour lab, 4 credits


Organic Chemistry I and II are second-year chemistry courses. Organic Chemistry I, CHE 200, is the first of two Organic Chemistry courses. Topics includes structure, bonding and reactivity in alkanes, alkenes and alkynes; stereochemistry; substitutions and eliminations of alkyl halides; and spectroscopy of IR and NMR. Laboratory work illustrates material learned in lectures and develops laboratory skills and techniques.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in CHE-111
  • Take CHE-200L;

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

CHE-201 Organic Chemistry II

3 hour lecture + 4 hour lab, 4 credits


This is the second of the Organic Chemistry courses. CHE 201 includes structure, bonding and reactivity in alcohols, ethers and epoxides, ketones and aldehydes, aromatic compounds and amines, carboxylic acids and derivatives; functional group transformations in organic synthesis; carbohydrates and amino acids. Laboratory work illustrates material learned in lectures and develops laboratory skills and techniques.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in CHE 200
  • Take CHE-201L

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

ECC-114 Partnerships - Part I - Child Guidance

30 hours lecture, 2 credits


This course offers an overview of philosophical and theoretical orientations that have influenced specific approaches to child guidance. Concepts related to these approaches will be discussed and students will be able to apply guidance strategies in their practice experiences. There will be a focus on encouragement and prevention.


Prerequisite(s):

  • ECC 104; may be taken as a co-requisite. Minimum Grade C.

For more information visit our timetable

ELC-110 Digital Electronics Analysis

83 hours Lecture, 83 hours Lab (Total hours 166)


Students will gain a theoretical and practical introduction to digital electronic techniques. Topics include number systems and codes; logic elements; Boolean algebra, De Morgan's theorem and Karnaugh maps; clocks, latches and flip-flops; D/A and A/D conversions; and digital memory techniques. In the lab, students will use MultiSim to verify the operation of digital circuits, which they will build, thus gaining a better understanding of the theoretical principles introduced. All students are required to demonstrate their mastery of these topics by designing and constructing a digital project.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to the Electronics Technician Core Program

For more information visit our timetable

ELC-206 Process Control SystemsPLA

55 hours lecture 55 hours lab


This course builds upon "Process Control Devices" (ELC 205). Students will learn about basic control systems in pressure, flow, level, temperature, analytic and mechanical processes.. They will also learn about system elements, including: pumps, valves, indicators, switches, recorders, transmitters, signal conditioners, drives and PID control of typical loops utilizing these elements. Regional industrial processes studied will include: Pulp and Paper, Steam Generation, Water Treatment, Mining, Food Processing and Hydro-electric Power Generation.


For more information visit our timetable

ELC-220 Autocad for Technicians

Lecture/Computer lab


Students will also learn the basics of AutoCAD and AutoCAD Electrical; the most widely used computer aided drafting program in industry. They will be able to use CAD to prepare schematic layouts, circuit and instrument diagrams, bill of material, and to import/export graphics files. This course is 90% CAD lab, 42 hours of immersion in AutoCAD and 19 hours developing CAD drawings as a component of other courses within the program.


Prerequisite(s):

  • None, High School Drafting recommended and familiarity with MS Windows applications and computers is strongly recommended.

For more information visit our timetable

ELC-240 Industrial Control of Chemical Processes

Lecture/lab


The Industrial Electronics Technician must have a good basic understanding of the processes, upon which he or she will be working. It is often necessary to communicate with engineers, operators, and chemists, as well as perform tasks safely. Many industrial processes including Water Treatment, Mining, Pulp and Paper and Combustion Emission systems, involve complex electronic controls and complex chemical reactions such as soda lime water treatment, chlorine, sodium hydroxide, sodium hypochlorite, sodium sulphite, sulphuric and other acids/bases. Students will review basic chemical reactions and learn an overview of chemical processes found in regional industries. This course is 60% lecture and 40% lab.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Electronics Technician Core training or equivalent

For more information visit our timetable

ENG-013 Fundamental English Level I

4 - 6 hours lecture, 3 credits


This course teaches skills in pre-reading and reading, pre-writing and writing, spelling, listening and speaking. Students will have individualized instruction in a classroom setting. Students may be matched with a tutor, based on tutor availability and student interest.


Prerequisite(s):

  • English placement testing

For more information visit our timetable

ENG-014 Fundamental English Level 2

4 - 6 hours lecture, 3 credits


This course teaches skills in reading, writing, spelling, listening and speaking. Students will have individualized instruction in a classroom setting. Students may be matched with a tutor, based on tutor availability and student interest.


Prerequisite(s):

  • English placement testing

For more information visit our timetable

ENG-015 Fundamental English Level 3

4 - 6 hours lecture, 3 credits


This course teaches skills in reading, writing, spelling, listening and speaking. Students will have individualized instruction in a classroom setting. After completing English 015, students will enroll in Fundamental English 025. Students may be matched with a tutor, based on tutor availability and student interest.


Prerequisite(s):

  • English placement testing

For more information visit our timetable

ENG-025 Fundamental English Level 4

6 - 7.5 hours lecture, 3 credits


This course teaches skills in reading, vocabulary, spelling, writing, studying, listening, and speaking. Students work within a group setting at the campuses. At the outlying centres, the centre instructor will set up a self-paced program of course work for students on an individual basis. Students can also work with a tutor if needed.


Prerequisite(s):

  • English placement testing

For more information visit our timetable

ENG-026 Fundamental English Level 5

6 - 7.5 hours lecture, 3 credits


This course teaches skills in reading, vocabulary, spelling, writing, studying, listening, and speaking. Students work within a group setting at the campuses. At the outlying centres, the centre instructor will set up a self-paced program of course work for students on an individual basis. Students can also work with a tutor if needed.


Prerequisite(s):

  • English placement testing

For more information visit our timetable

ENG-027 Fundamental English Level 6

6 - 7.5 hours lecture, 3 credits


This course teaches skills in reading, vocabulary, spelling, writing, studying, listening, and speaking. Students work within a group setting at the campuses. At the outlying centres, the centre instructor will set up a self-paced program of course work for students on an individual basis. After completing English 027, students will move to the intermediate English level. Students can also work with a tutor if needed.


Prerequisite(s):

  • English placement testing

For more information visit our timetable

ENG-116 Essay Writing & Indigenous Perspectives

3 hours lecture, or distance (D), 3 credits


ENG 116 introduces university-level research and writing in the humanities and social sciences and/or natural sciences with a specific focus on contemporary Indigenous issues in Canada. Students will critically analyze and study the writing, oral and aural practices of Indigenous scholars and teachers in a variety of disciplines and settings. Emphasis is placed on respecting and interweaving non-Indigenous and Indigenous ways of knowing and research methodologies in writing a post-secondary research paper. Students may not receive credit for ENG 116 if they have previously completed ENG 115, ENG 117 or ENG 125.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 098, ENG 096, ESL 090 or ENG 160; or English Assessment; or Academic IELTS overall score of 6.0 with band scores of 6.0 in Writing and Reading (Effective for the 2018/19 academic year); or completion of ENG 104.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

ENG-117 Academic Writing

3 hours lecture, or distance (D), 3 credits


This course is an introduction to university-level research and writing in the humanities and social sciences and/or natural sciences. It is designed to help students acquire the research skills and understand the writing practices used by scholars in a variety of academic disciplines. As a way of focusing discussion, students will examine different disciplinary approaches to a single research topic. Note: Credit will only be granted for ENG 115 or ENG 117 or ENG 125.


Prerequisite(s):

  • B in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, NIC ENG 098, ENG 096, ENG 060 or ESL 090, or C or better in any University-transferable English course, or English assessment.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

ENG-122 Reading Literature

3 hours lecture, or distance (D), 3 credits


In this course, you will become familiar with selected writers and their works and themes; develop and understanding of literary terms, techniques, and styles, and analyze fiction, drama, poetry and literary non-fiction using a range of critical approaches. The long-term objective of this course is to gain a greater understanding of yourself and others. You will, as Frederick Nietzsche commands, "Read...your own life and from this understanding the hieroglyphs of universal life!" Students may not receive credit for ENG 122 if they have previously taken ENG 120, ENG 121 or ENG 126.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C+ in Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 096, ENG 098 or ESL 090; or C in ENG 115, ENG 116, or ENG 117; or English Assessment; or Academic IELTS overall score of 6.0 with band scores of 6.5 in Writing and Reading; or completion of ENG 104.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

ENG-127 Indigenous Literatures in Canada

3 hours lecture, or distance (D), 3 credits


English 127 introduces students to Indigenous literatures in Canada with emphasis on their historical, political, and cultural contexts. Students will study works selected from various genres, including story-telling, both oral and written, non-fiction writing, novels, short stories, drama, and poetry, as well as art, film, and digital media. They will learn to write reflective and scholarly analysis by interweaving Indigenous and Western approaches to textual interpretation and literary criticism. Students may not receive credit for ENG 127 if they have previously completed ENG 120, ENG 121 or ENG 126


Prerequisite(s):

  • C+ in Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090; or C in ENG 115, ENG 116, or ENG 117; or English Assessment; or Academic IELTS overall score of 6.0 with band scores of 6.5 in Writing and Reading; or completion of ENG 104.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

ENR-151 Engineering Graphics with CAD

3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 3 credits


This course is intended for students in first-year engineering. The course covers the fundamentals of orthographic projection, technical sketching, schematic diagrams, engineering graphic standards and conventions, computer representation of data and problem solving with engineering graphical techniques. Drafting is taught through sketched assignments and assignments performed on computer using CAD software.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in MAT 133 and PHY 120
  • Take ENR-151L

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

FAC-015 Red Cross First Responder

40 hours


Pre-hospital care and CPR skills for professional first responders or those wanting to become first responders. Course teaches techniques for sustaining life, preventing further injuries, and caring for illnesses and injuries until the next level of medical personnel arrives. Includes CPR level HCP and AED. The certification is valid for three years.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Participants must be certified in CPR Level C. Pre-reading and homework required, contact First Aid Dept at 250-334-5092 to arrange to pick-up course materials. Minimum of 16 years of age and students under 19 years of age require a parent/ guardian signed waiver.

For more information visit our timetable

FAC-055 Psychological First Aid


This exciting program teaches everyone how to help others experiencing loss, grief and stress, and also self-care. Learners will come away with coping strategies to prevent, identify and deal with stressful events, and they will better understand what supports are available to them and how they can access or help others to access specialized support. This program uses the Red Cross Look, Listen, Link, Live model. The course consists of 3 components: There are two online components you MUST complete before doing the in class portion. The two online portions are Self-Care and Caring for Others which are approximately 45 - 90 minutes each to complete. Then the in class session which is 8 hours in length. PFA is built on the latest evidence-based research from the international community and was developed in response to a growing need within our communities and to address a gap in wellness program options with a focus on resiliency.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Students 18 years of age (recommended)

For more information visit our timetable

Online registration is available for this course. View upcoming start dates and register.

FAC-062 Red Cross Standard First Aid with CPR Level HCP

16 hours


This is a comprehensive first aid course for those who require the skills and knowledge necessary to deal with life-threatening situations and to give assistance to people in physical distress. Includes all of the content of the Emergency First Aid course (FAC 020) plus injuries due to heat and cold, medical conditions, bone and joint injuries, head and spinal injuries, and moving and transportation. Adult, child and infant CPR techniques for health care providers and other professional rescuers. Skills taught and practiced include one and two-rescuer CPR with pulse checks, bag valve mask, respiratory arrest, AED, and management of the obstructed airway in the adult, child and infant. Certification is by the Red Cross and is valid for a period of three years, but yearly recertification in CPR Level HCP is recommended.


For more information visit our timetable

FBR-107 Material Handling Equipment

10 hours


This course is designed to teach the reason for correct material handling procedures and methods, also to operate material handling equipment. Students will learn how to calculate mass for safe lifting; and load carrying capacity of rope, chains, cable and synthetic slings. This course also teaches safe rigging and disconnecting.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to the Metal Fabrication Program

For more information visit our timetable

FBR-108 Structural Layout and Development Techniques

20 hours


This course is designed to teach identification of the structural shape used in the structural steel industry, how structural shapes are made at the steel mill and why mill tolerance would need to be taken into consideration. This course also teaches the student the fundamentals of structural template development,and fitting techniques. Also taught are the interpretation of engineer data sheets such as clip placement, hole pitch, hole gauge and edge distance, as well as the interpretation of abbreviations and symbols as used on structural drawings (Blueprints).


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to the Metal Fabrication Program

For more information visit our timetable

FBR-110 Surface Preparation

10 hours


This course is designed to teach the student the common methods of metal preparation such as brushing, grinding, sand blasting, scraping, chemical, etc. Also covered are the methods of finishing after the metal has been prepared, such as: galvanizing, spray painting, anodizing, electroplating, etc. and the safety, and environmental considerations and property damage.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to the Metal Fabrication Program

For more information visit our timetable

FIN-130 Fdn Studio in 3 Dimensnl Art & Design

4 hours, includes lecture and studio time, 3 credits


This foundation studio art course is an introduction to three-dimensional art and design. Students are familiarized with the technical, material and conceptual frameworks and approaches to three-dimensional structures. Elements and principals, processes and vocabulary of three-dimensional art and design are introduced through a variety of studio projects. Historical and contemporary concepts will be explored along with their applications and relationship to three-dimensional form, with an emphasis on the 20th and 21st century art and design practices.


Prerequisite(s):

  • FIN 110 (may be taken as a co-requisite).

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

FIN-210 Drawing & 2-DIMENSIONAL Language III

4 hours, includes lecture + studio time, 3 credits


In this course students deepen their understanding of representational drawing methods by exploring objective, subjective and conceptual approaches. Students will advance their formal drawing techniques, and utilize it as a means of visual expression. Course projects serve an opportunity for students to engage in research, experimentation, consultation and production. An emphasis will be put on comprehension, analysis, and ability to resolve artistic problems.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Completion of FIN 111

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

FIN-211 Drawing & 2-Dimensional Language IV

4 hours, includes lecture + studio time 3 credits


This course employs creative and critical inquiry to investigate mixed media and interdisciplinary practices in drawing. Through exploration and experimentation students will develop individualized approaches to technical, formal and conceptual drawing skills. Emphasis will be on drawing as a process to develop imagery that integrates representation, imagination and personal expression.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Completion of FIN 210

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

FIN-215 Intaglio Printmaking

4 hours, includes lecture + studio time 3 credits


This course is an in-depth investigation of the materials and techniques related to intaglio printmaking including, dry-point, etching, collograph and monotype. Multi-colour printing, chin colle, mixed media and experimental approaches are explored. Assigned and self-directed projects, demonstrations, class discussion and critiques encourage student's artistic development and expression of contemporary ideas in print form.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Completion of FIN 115

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

FIN-221 Painting Intermediate II

4 hours, includes lecture + studio time, 3 credits


This course is a continuation of FIN 220, concepts of visual language and critical inquiry are used to investigate the discipline of painting. Through exploration and experimentation students will develop individualized approaches to technical, formal and conceptual painting. Emphasis will be on painting as a process to develop thematic imagery and personal expression.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Completion of FIN 220.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

FIN-231 Sculpture & Integrated Art Practices II

4 hours, includes lecture + studio time 3 credits


A continuation of FIN 230, this course provides students opportunities to expand and refine their approaches to the development and creation of contemporary sculpture. Emphasis is placed on developing and sustaining individual research and studio practice, incorporating diverse technical, aesthetic, conceptual and theoretical considerations. Student presentations and critiques provide opportunities for development and contextualizing of intentions and practice.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Completion of FIN 230

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

FIN-245 Photography Intermediate II

4 hours, includes lecture + lab 3 credits


This course will serve to expand technical and conceptual skills in photography as an expressive, interpretive and metaphorical art form. Students will use photographic equipment, materials and processes in the production of black & white photographic imagery. Experimental approaches to the photographic medium, ideas and content are emphasized. Students are encouraged to develop their own area of research and to build their artistic identity. Single Lens reflex film cameras are provided for students to use in this course.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Completion of FIN 145

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

FIN-348 Kilns and Firing Technology 4

30 hours, Includes Lecture and Studio Time


This course will focus on wood firing and will give the students a rare opportunity to fire a traditional Japanese style anagama at Gordon Hutchens' studio on Denman Island. We will cover special loading and firing considerations for this type of kiln, such as, allowing pathways for flames through the ware, dry compared with wet wood, utilizing natural fly ash to create unique glaze surfaces.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to the Professional Potter Advanced Diploma Program

For more information visit our timetable

FIN-723 Editorial/Photojournal Photography

3 credits


Illustrating magazine articles and shooting for publishers as a freelance editorial photographer or photojournalist is the emphasis of this course. Equipment, film, planning shoots, working for photo editors, selling photo rights, contracts and payment schedules, marketing, photo editing, packaging and shipping assignments are included.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to the Professional Photography Program

For more information visit our timetable

FLM-016 Lighting: Film & Tv Industry


The course provides individuals with an opportunity to explore the industry while learning of the requirements of working in a fast-paced environment. Lighting and Electrical team members hold a pivotal role in all productions being responsible for the planning, development and execution of lighting schemes while ensuring that all electrical considerations are safely addressed. Instruction encompasses introduction to the industry; orientation to safety and site protocols; planning and coordination of work orders; applied learning with fixtures, filters, carts, stands and the various applications of sophisticated equipment and tools. Instruction encompasses valued insight into how best to support the execution of film or television shots with professionalism and accuracy.


For more information visit our timetable

GENI-3082 Public Speaking: Transform Nerves & Speak With Power


This workshop teaches practical skills to shift nervous thinking into present moment engagement, access vocal power and range, communicate with clear intention, bring language to life, and speak to the hearts of your listeners. It combines information-packed content with opportunity for practice and 1-1 coaching within an encouraging learning environment that honors individual learning styles, preferences, and comfort zones.


For more information visit our timetable

Online registration is available for this course. View upcoming start dates and register.

GEO-111 Environment, Society and Sustainability

Distance (D), 3 credits


This course focuses on the complex relationships between people and the environment. It provides an introduction to how the biosphere functions, examines the impacts of human activities and resource exploitation on the environment, and considers the potential for a sustainable society. Topics covered include; energy flow, biogeochemical cycles, ecosystem structure and dynamics, climate change, water resources, marine resources, biodiversity loss, protected areas and endangered species, human population growth, ecological footprint analysis, and environmental world-views.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090; or assessment.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

GEO-205 Geography of British Columbia

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


GEO 205 explores the physical and human landscapes that are British Columbia. The course is a blend of the regional and wholistic systems approaches to the relationships between physiography, climate, resources and people. Basic geomorphology, natural hazards and other constraints on land use in British Columbia are examined.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090; or placement testing.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

GEO-211 Natural Resources Management II: Wildlife

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


The course introduces students to the world of wildlife. Then, the issues associated with wildlife utilization are examined. Wildlife management policies, programs, and practices are reviewed with particular emphasis on Canada and BC. Some of the topics covered include: animal behaviour, inventory methods, population monitoring, land use and wildlife, approaches to management, the conservation of wildlife and wildlife management in the Comox Valley.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Any first year GEO Course Minimum grade C

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

HCA-125 Healing 2: Caring for Individuals experiencing Cognitive or Mental Challenges

60 hours lecture, 3 credits


This course builds on content from other courses to assist students to explore concepts and care-giving approaches that will allow them to work effectively with individuals experiencing cognitive or mental challenges. The emphasis in this course supporting clients with dementia, recognizing responsive behaviours and identifying person-centred intervention strategies.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to the Health Care Assistant Program

For more information visit our timetable

HCA-130 Work Role: Introduction to HCA

30 hours lecture, 2 credit


This course provides an introduction to the role of the HCA within the British Columbia healthcare system. Students will be introduced to the healthcare team and the roles and functions of HCA within the team. Students will also have opportunities to develop self-reflective skills required for competent practice and will be introduced to effective job-finding approaches.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to the Health Care Assistant Program

For more information visit our timetable

HIS-135 World Mythology

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


The secret of life, explains the sacred tavern-keeper Siduri in an ancient Sumerian epic, is that there is no secret. "When the gods created man they allotted to him death, but life they retained in their own keeping", he tells the king Gilgamesh. "Fill your belly with good things, dance and be merry, feast and rejoice. Let your clothes be fresh, bathe yourself in water, cherish the little child that holds your hand, and make your wife happy in your embrace; for this too is the lot of man." This course will in some ways defy the strictures of Utnapishtim in returning to the questions that rest at the centre of world mythology. Who are we? Where do we come from? Where are we going? What is the nature of the cosmos? What is the relationship between the individual, the family, the community and the transcendent? How are life and death intertwined? We will discuss such questions in a philosophical context but the thrust of the course will be to use an historical and comparative framework that analyzes particular mythic traditions. Rather than attempt to encompass all of world mythology within a one-term course, we will focus upon the myths of Babylonia, Egypt, Greece, Rome, Northern Europe, Mesoamerica and the Pacific Northwest as case studies.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090; or placement testing.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

HMC-101 Trade Overview


Introduction to the Heavy Duty trades and an overview of employer expectations, employee responsibilities, customer relations and communication within a work team. In this course you will also study job searches including resume writing and the interview process.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Acceptance into the Heavy Mechanical Foundation program

For more information visit our timetable

HMC-108 Wire Ropes

4 hours lecture, 2 hours shop


Service wire rope used in winches and various applications.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to the Heavy Mechanical Foundation program

For more information visit our timetable

HMC-118 Standard Transmissions & Clutches

13 hours lecture, 24 hours shop


Introduces students to basic power transmissions and clutches.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to the Heavy Mechanical Foundation program;

For more information visit our timetable

HSW-137 Sup Strat for Skills Dev Cross-Cultural

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


HSW 137 introduces students to the principles of culturally responsible behavior support. Students will investigate current positive behavioral interventions and support (PBIS) strategies and compare and contrast these with traditional Indigenous approaches to behavior support and intervention. Culturally responsive support strategies for skill development and enhancement of quality of life will also be included.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to the Human Services Certificate- Educational Assistant/Community Support, Indigenous Focus program. C in HSW 131, HSW 132, HSW 164, FNS 160, ENG 115 or ENG 117, and PSY 250.
  • Corequisites: HSW 130, HSW 166, HSW 170, PSY 251.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

HTC-102 Hatchery Design and Systems

4 credits


This course introduces students to fundamental hatchery systems and designs. Theoretical and applied instruction will include hatchery site assessment, planning and design considerations and related support system requirements. Instruction also includes engineering concepts applicable to hatchery operations such as basic electrical, plumbing, water supply, drainage, aeration, and recirculating aquaculture systems.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in English 10; or C in two of Composition 10, Creative Writing 10, Literary Studies 10, New Media 10, Spoken Language 10, English First Peoples Writing 10, English First Peoples Literary Studies 10, English First Peoples New Media 10, English First Peoples Spoken Language 10, or NIC ENG-035, or C+ in Communications 12, or C+ in ESL 062 and 065; or successful NIC assessment testing in English; and C in one of Principles of Math 10, Apprenticeship & Workplace Math 10, Workplace Math 10, Foundations of Math & Pre-Calculus 10, Applications of Math 11, NIC MAT-029, or successful NIC assessment testing in math.

For more information visit our timetable

HTC-103 Fish Hatchery Operations

4 credits


This course encompasses theoretical and applied instruction specific to the day-to-day operational considerations of a fish hatchery. Emphasis will be placed on required protocols to support and enable healthy fish development and seedling production critical to stock enhancement for improved conservation. Instruction also includes monitoring and controlling environmental factors and pathogens to maximize health during the early life stages.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in English 10; or C in two of Composition 10, Creative Writing 10, Literary Studies 10, New Media 10, Spoken Language 10, English First Peoples Writing 10, English First Peoples Literary Studies 10, English First Peoples New Media 10, English First Peoples Spoken Language 10, or NIC ENG-035, or C+ in Communications 12, or C+ in ESL 062 and 065; or successful NIC assessment testing in English; and C in one of Principles of Math 10, Apprenticeship & Workplace Math 10, Workplace Math 10, Foundations of Math & Pre-Calculus 10, Applications of Math 11, NIC MAT-029, or successful NIC assessment testing in math.

For more information visit our timetable

HTC-104 Hatchery Health and Safety

4 credits


This course introduces students to common safe work practices of stock enhancement facilities. Hazard recognition and emergency preparedness will be thoroughly discussed and applied throughout the course to include fundamentals of personal protective equipment requirements and specifications. Workplace rights and responsibilities are also discussed.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in English 10; or C in two of Composition 10, Creative Writing 10, Literary Studies 10, New Media 10, Spoken Language 10, English First Peoples Writing 10, English First Peoples Literary Studies 10, English First Peoples New Media 10, English First Peoples Spoken Language 10, or NIC ENG-035, or C+ in Communications 12, or C+ in ESL 062 and 065; or successful NIC assessment testing in English; and C in one of Principles of Math 10, Apprenticeship & Workplace Math 10, Workplace Math 10, Foundations of Math & Pre-Calculus 10, Applications of Math 11, NIC MAT-029, or successful NIC assessment testing in math.

For more information visit our timetable

HTC-105 Disease Management in Hatchery Environments

4 credits


This course encompasses fish health and disease management from the perspective of fish, the pathogen, and the environment. Emphasis will be given to major diseases, epidemiology, and pathogen characteristics, as well as disease prevention, and mitigation.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in English 10; or C in two of Composition 10, Creative Writing 10, Literary Studies 10, New Media 10, Spoken Language 10, English First Peoples Writing 10, English First Peoples Literary Studies 10, English First Peoples New Media 10, English First Peoples Spoken Language 10, or NIC ENG-035, or C+ in Communications 12, or C+ in ESL 062 and 065; or successful NIC assessment testing in English; and C in one of Principles of Math 10, Apprenticeship & Workplace Math 10, Workplace Math 10, Foundations of Math & Pre-Calculus 10, Applications of Math 11, NIC MAT-029, or successful NIC assessment testing in math.

For more information visit our timetable

HTC-106 Stock Enhancement Practicum Environments

2 credits


This practicum provides students with onsite experience within fish hatchery facilities in addition to specialized fish enhancement society facilities. Under supervision, students will apply their knowledge and skills in the fish hatchery environment.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Complete all other Level 1 HTC courses.

For more information visit our timetable

HUC-106 Unit Clerk Practicum

2.5 credits


The practicum provides an opportunity for the student to integrate and apply skills and knowledge obtained through coursework, and practice skills in a workplace setting. The student will be expected to work the days that the instructor assigns, which could involve day, evening, or weekend schedules.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to the Hospital Unit Clerk Program

For more information visit our timetable

JNY-115 Apply Layout Techniques

117 hours


This course describes the different methods of sketching and drafting of wood objects used in the Joinery Trade. Students will apply these methods in producing sketches and drawings.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to the Joinery/Cabinetmaking Program

For more information visit our timetable

LHA-200 Landscape Horticulture Apprenticeship - Level 2 Enriched

240 hours


This apprenticeship program is designed for people employed at landscape companies, municipal parks, golf courses, garden centres, nurseries, and other related horticulture businesses. Horticulture Apprenticeship links learning and employment by providing apprentices the opportunity to further their education, while maintaining employment in the horticulture industry. Registrants must have a sponsor in the field, an ITA ID#, and have successfully completed the Level 1 training. The ITA curriculum has been developed and approved by the horticulture industry and NIC has enriched the curriculum with additional topics on landscape maintenance and design, putting you a step ahead with extra skills that are attractive to employers. This program prepares you to take the ITA Level 2 exam towards the Landscape Horticulture Red Seal Certification.


Prerequisite(s):

  • LHA 100

For more information visit our timetable

LHC-101 Horticulture Practices


Students will learn about personal safety in the workplace including how to select and use personal protective equipment and how to identify fire types and extinguishing methods. Potential work hazards including electrical, chemical, environmental and behavioural risks will be discussed. Students will practice safe and effective work habits required to maintain landscapes according to the appropriate level as specified in the BC Landscape Standard.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to the Landscape Horticulture Fundamentals Certificate Program

For more information visit our timetable

LHC-130 Understanding Soil


Horticulturists need to understand physical, biological and chemical properties of soils and their effects on plant growth. Students in this course will examine soil and soil-less media samples to learn about their qualities, profiles and chemical characteristics.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to the Landscape Horticulture Fundamentals Certificate Program

For more information visit our timetable

LIB-130 Intro to World Religions

1.5 hr Lecture + 1.5 hr Seminar, 3 credits


This course is designed as an introduction to the world's major religions, with an emphasis upon those of the Abrahamic tradition: Judaism, Islam and Christianity. It combines an intensive focus upon individual living faiths with study of the different scholarly approaches to understanding religion. Instruction will combine intensive reading, seminar discussion and lecture presentations. Students who have previously earned credit in NIC's HIS 130 are not eligible for credit in LIB 130.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090; or placement testing.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

MAT-017 Fundamental Math Level 1

3 credits


This is a self-paced course that teaches the number system, addition and, subtraction of whole numbers, estimations, time, and shapes.


Prerequisite(s):

  • No Prerequisites Required.

For more information visit our timetable

MAT-018 Fundamental Math Level 2

150 hours, 3 credit


This is a self-paced course that teaches the number system and how to add, subtract, and multiply. Students also learn how to make change, tell time, add and subtract units of time, and how to find the perimeter of square and rectangles.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Math 017 or mathematics skills assessment

For more information visit our timetable

MAT-019 Fundamental Math Level 3

150 hours, 3 credit


This is a self-paced course that teaches students how to multiply and divide. Students also learn how to make change, and convert units of time by adding and subtracting. They are also introduced to the metric system and learn how to measure length, volume, and mass, as well as how to figure out the area of rectangles and squares.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Math 018 or mathematics skills assessment

For more information visit our timetable

MAT-027 Fundamental Math Level 4

150 hours, 3 credits


This is a self-paced course that teaches how to add, subtract, multiply, and divide decimals, as well as how to use decimals in real life. Students also learn the metric system.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Math 019 or mathematics skills assessment

For more information visit our timetable

MAT-028 Fundamental Math Level 5

150 hours, 3 credits


This is a self-paced course that teaches students common fractions and decimals, equivalent fractions, and how to multiply, divide, add, and subtract fractions.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Math 027 or mathematics skills assessment

For more information visit our timetable

MAT-029 Fundamental Math Level 6

150 hours, 3 credits


This is a self-paced course that teaches students the basics of ratios, rates & proportion, percents, and introductory statistics.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Math 028 or mathematics skills assessment

For more information visit our timetable

NAU-013 Oral Exam on General Seamanship - Preparation

35 hours


This course provides preparation and guidance for those applying to Transport Canada for an Oral Examination on General Seamanship. Topics will include the competencies and proficiencies expected of Master Limited, Master 150Ton and Fishing Master IV mariners. This course teaches students about the responsibilities of a Master under the Canada Shipping Act and applicable regulations. At the end of the course, students will be able to confidently communicate the vessel safety and prudent seamanship techniques applicable to their vessel and area of operation. Note: upon completion of the course, students are responsible for booking their Oral Exam directly with a Transport Canada examination centre.


Prerequisite(s):

For more information visit our timetable

NAU-022 Ship Construction & Stability Level 2

60 hours


This course prepares fishermen applying to Transport Canada for Examinations on Ship Construction and Stability Level 2, as required for Fishing Master Class I, II and III certification. This course teaches aspects of ship construction that can ensure the seaworthiness of a Fishing Vessel, how fishing operations can compromise the stability of a vessel, Centre of Gravity, Centre of Buoyancy, Metacentre, righting arms and the effect of water density on displacement. Students will also learn how to conduct practical calculations based on a vessel's stability data booklet. Candidates book their final examination directly with a Transport Canada examination centre.


Prerequisite(s):

For more information visit our timetable

NUR-204 Nursing Practice III: Promoting Health And Healing

2 hours seminar + 10 hours practice, 6 credits


This nursing practice experience provides opportunities to develop caring relationships with individuals and families for the purpose of health promotion while coming to understand their unique health and healing processes. Participants will have opportunities to practice nursing approaches that accompany this understanding. Participants work with families and individuals experiencing common health challenges (both episodic and chronic) in the home and community, in agencies, and in care facilities to incorporate concepts and learning from all the courses in this semester into their nursing practice. The community and society are considered as contextual influences on the promotion of health and healing for the individual and the family.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Successful completion of year 1

For more information visit our timetable

NUR-206 Health And Healing III: Health Challenges/Healing Initiatives

3 hours seminar, 3 hours learning centre, 6 credits


Building on the learners' understanding of health, the focus of this course is on people's experience with healing for both chronic and episodic health challenges. Participants integrate theory and concepts of health as they relate to healing. This course is complementary to Health Sciences III and provides opportunities for learners to integrate pathophysiology with their understanding of health and healing and the nursing approaches that accompany this understanding.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Successful completion of year 1

For more information visit our timetable

NUR-214 Nursing Practice IV: Promoting Health and Healing

2 hours seminar +10 hours practice, 6 credits


This nursing practice experience continues to provide opportunities for learners to develop caring relationships with individuals and families for the purpose of health promotion while coming to understand their health and healing processes when experiencing more complex health challenges, both episodic and chronic. Participants will have opportunities to practice nursing approaches that accompany this understanding. Participants work with families and individuals in the home and community, in agencies, and in care facilities to incorporate concepts and learning from all the courses in this semester into their nursing practice. The community and society are considered as contextual influences on the promotion of health for the individual and the family.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Successful completion of Term 3

For more information visit our timetable

NUR-216 Health and Healing IV: Health Challenges/Healing Initiatives

3 hours seminar,3 hours learning centre, 6 credits


Participants in this course continue to develop an understanding of people's experience with healing related to a variety of increasingly complex chronic and episodic health challenges within a variety of practice contexts. This course is complementary to Health Sciences IV and provides opportunities for learners to integrate pathophysiology with their understanding of health and healing and the nursing approaches that accompany this understanding.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Successful completion of Term 3

For more information visit our timetable

NUR-304 Nursing Practice V: Promoting Health and Healing

2 hours seminar + 10 hours practice, 6 credits


This nursing practice experience continues to provide opportunities for learners to develop caring relationships with individuals and families while coming to understand their health and healing processes. Participants will have opportunities to practice nursing approaches that accompany this understanding. Participants work with families and individuals in the home and community, in agencies, and in care facilities to incorporate concepts and learning from all the courses in this semester into their nursing practice.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Successful completion of Year 2

For more information visit our timetable

NUR-313 Professional Practice IV: Nursing Inquiry

3 hours seminar, 3 credits


Building upon concepts introduced in Professional Practice I, II, and III. In this course,participants will explore the historical and philosophical approaches to the development of nursing knowledge and inquiry. Relationships between practice, theory, and research are explored.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Successful completion of Term 5 or admission to Option B

For more information visit our timetable

NUR-316 Health And Healing VII: Promoting Community and Societal Health

3 hours seminar, 3 credits


This course focuses on the role of the nurse in the promotion of community and societal health. It is intended to be a companion course with Health and Healing VI. Participants will continue to develop their competencies in relational practice with a focus on community and society as client. The political role of the nurse is explored as the emphasis is placed upon working with communities from a social justice and equity perspective. Community development and capacity building, as a pattern of community health promotion practice, is explored. In addition students will further develop their understanding of teaching and learning focusing on transformative and emancipatory approaches.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Successful completion of Term 5 or admission to Option B

For more information visit our timetable

NUR-405 Professional Practice V: Leadership in Nursing

3 hours seminar, 3 credits


This course explores the ways nurses can provide leadership, influence, create and manage change for the promotion of health for individuals, families, groups and communities within the context of society and the world. Emphasis is placed on leadership roles of the nurse within practice contexts. The role of the nurse within the current and evolving Canadian health care system is explored including considerations of the impact of global trends and issues. Issues facing nurses in the current work environment will be discussed. Collaborative and ethical approaches for working within institutional philosophies and frameworks will be explored.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Successful completion of Term 6 or admission to Option B

For more information visit our timetable

OFA-001 WHMIS 2015

4 hours


This course is an introduction to the Workplace Hazardous Material Information System. The course includes the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling for chemicals (GHS) as well as WHMIS legislation introduced in 1988. Participants must attend and participate in 100% of the course.


For more information visit our timetable

PBH-300 Plumbing Appr Harmonized Level 3

180 hours


This course encompasses instruction on water services and distribution systems, sewers and sewage treatment systems in addition to hydronic and specialized systems. Instruction also includes cross connection control devices and assemblies, electrical schematics and wiring, gas fired system planning and installations. This course follows the requeirements of ITA Plumber Apprenticeship Harmonized Level 3.


Prerequisite(s):

  • ITA Registered Apprentice

For more information visit our timetable

PCA-100 Professional Cook 1

840 hours


During Professional Cook 1 training, you'll gain the basic knowledge needed for a career in food preparation. Learn safety and sanitary standards, production procedures, menu planning, and the ordering and inventory of supplies. Gain knowledge of ingredients and nutritional properties, and how to prepare stocks, soups, sauces, vegetables, fruit, potatoes, pastas and farinaceous products. You'll learn to prepare dressings, salads, sandwiches, egg dishes and breakfast cookery, dairy products and cheeses, principles of baking, pastries, desserts, quick breads, cookies, yeast products and beverages. You'll also learn how to cut, process, and prepare meats, poultry, fish and shellfish.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to the Culinary Arts Program

For more information visit our timetable

PCA-101 Occup Skills & Ind Stndrs Essentials Standards Essentials

6 credits


This course introduces students to the building blocks that construct the world of Professional Culinary Arts. Students will be introduced to trade knowledge, kitchen safety, food safety, the use of industrial equipment, production procedures, ordering, inventory, cost management, menu planning and knife skills. Course content will encompass culinary terms, best practices for professional hygiene and industry safety requirements. Students will develop strong kitchen workplace, organization and management skills. In addition, students will have the opportunity to develop their knife skills specific to basic vegetable cuts, fish fileting techniques, and butchery basics.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Acceptance into the program.

For more information visit our timetable

PCA-102 Short Order

3 credits


This course introduces students to the principles and preparation methods of egg dishes, dairy products and cheeses, sandwiches, salads, dressings and condiments. The principles and methods of different types of sandwiches and salads and their ingredients will be introduced, and consideration to regional based sources of protein, produce and dairy products will be reviewed.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Acceptance into the program.

For more information visit our timetable

PCA-104 Vegetables, Starches, and Fruits

2 credits


Students will acquire the skills and knowledge of selecting, cutting, storing, and cooking vegetables and fruits. This course also encompasses principles and methods of selecting, and cooking potatoes, pastas, including rice, grains, and legumes, for service to customers.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Acceptance into the program.

For more information visit our timetable

PCA-105 Protein Cookery Essentials

2 credits


This course provides theoretical and applied learning for future Chefs as they learn the essential elements of proteins. Instruction encompasses types of proteins, muscle and bone structure, grading, and storage of beef, pork, lamb, veal, poultry, seafood, and shellfish. Students will process and prepare the meat, poultry, and seafood with a variety of short order cooking methods.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Acceptance into the program.

For more information visit our timetable

PCA-107 The Lab

3 credits


In this course, The Lab, students will practice the preparation of products aligned with Garde Manger, Breakfast, Butchery, and Short Order. Students will prepare a variety of soups, salads, dressings, assorted cold platters, in addition to classic and specialty hot and cold sandwiches. Students will also learn basic butchery techniques, preparation of meats, poultry, and seafood associated to Garde Manger and Short Order.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Acceptance into the program.

For more information visit our timetable

PCA-108 The Café

3 credits


In The Café students will prepare products aligned with Garde Manger, Breakfast, Butchery, Short Order, while participating in the day-to-day foodservice operations of the Café. Students will prepare a variety of salads, dressings, assorted cold platters, classic and specialty hot and cold sandwiches, desserts and specialty non-alcoholic beverages.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Acceptance into the program.

For more information visit our timetable

PCA-204 Vegetables, Starches, and Fresh Pasta

2 credits


Students will receive instruction on advanced techniques of vegetable selection, storing and preparation. Students will be introduced to regional specialty products which may complement planned menus and may be well suited to vegetarian meal planning and preparation. Instruction also includes fresh stuffed pasta.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Acceptance into the program.

For more information visit our timetable

PCA-207 Regional Products and Procurements

1.5 credits


In this course students will be introduced to regional products while identifying local sources for produce and protein to include a range of vegetables, cheeses, meats, and seafood. Students will gain knowledge of the benefits of accessing regionally-based products and the impact on food quality and production whilst reviewing the value of regional based purchasing in support of the regional economy. Students will participate in field trips to regional farms while learning procurement processes.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Acceptance into the program.

For more information visit our timetable

PCA-209 The Restaurant

3 credits


Working in a team environment students will be responsible for the back-of-house preparation of fine dining meals for The Restaurant to encompass an array of specialty menus comprised of fine dining appetizers, salads, soups, sauces, vegetables, starches, proteins, and desserts. Students will also be responsible for front-of-house service while continuously applying their skills in The Restaurant as they refine their food service and quality management skills.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Acceptance into the program.

For more information visit our timetable

PCA-308 Foodservice Production and Operations

3 credits


This course provides students with a comprehensive overview of the food service industry, a systems approach to food service operations and management, industry practices, business ethics quality assurance, functional subsystems of production, regulations, business communications and leadership. Topics also include food product flow and kitchen design, procurement, food production, distribution and service.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission into Culinary Business Operations Advanced Diploma program

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

PCK-100 Cooking Fundamentals

358 hrs


Learn the basic skills of cooking to prepare you for an entry level position in the food service industry, or prepare your skills for the Professional Cook program. Explore food safety and sanitation, as well as fundamental skills in preparing and cooking food such as: stocks, soups, vegetables, salads, sandwiches, meat, poultry and baked goods.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission into the Prep Cook Program

For more information visit our timetable

PFH-103 Piping Equipment

4 credits


This course encompasses theory and applied learning on equipment used in the piping trades. Emphasis will be given to rigging, hoisting, lifting and positioning equipment. Students will learn how to hoist and secure piping racks and large diameter pipe as well as use crane signals. This course also teaches participants how to use different slings, knots, and ropes for a variety of different applications. The course follows the requirements of ITA Plumber, Sprinkler Fitter and Steamfitter/Pipefitter Harmonized Level 1 training.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to the Plumbing and Piping Trades Foundation Harmonized Certificate Program.

For more information visit our timetable

PHI-101 Introductory Philosophy: Values & Society

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


An introduction to selected problems in philosophical ethics and social-political philosophy. Topics include the relativity or objectivity of values; egoism and altruism; the nature of right and wrong action; classical and contemporary ethical theories; applied ethical problems; the nature of justice; the relation between individuals and society; and approaches to the meaning of life.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090; or placement testing. PHI 101 may be taken before or after PHI 100.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

PHI-211 Philosophies of Existence

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


An examination of the 19th-century forerunners of contemporary existentialism, concentrating principally on the themes and methods of theistic and atheistic existential thought that emerge in the writings of Dostoevsky, Kierkegaard, and Nietzsche. The course is organized around various attempts to reinterpret the Judeo-Christian God. Particular attention will be paid to how and why existential thinkers have set themselves in opposition to the mainstream philosophical tradition.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in any first or second year Philosophy course, or instructor permission

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

PHY-141 Mechanics I (Statics)

3 hours lecture, 1.5 hours tutorial, 3 credits


This course is an introduction to engineering mechanics for students planning to transfer into a University engineering program. The course introduces a methodology for analysis of forces and moments acting on, or within, rigid bodies, structures and machines that are in static equilibrium. Topics include conditions of equilibrium and applications to particles and rigid bodies; analysis of structures, including beams, trusses and arches; bending moment and shear force diagrams for beams; dry friction.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in MAT 181 and MAT 133.
  • Corequisite: MAT 182.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

PNS-116 Integrated Nursing Practice 1

Lecture + Lab, 4 credits


This course emphasizes the art and science of nursing, focusing on the development of basic nursing care and assessment. Learners will apply nursing knowledge through the practice of clinical decision-making, nursing assessment and nursing interventions aimed at promoting health, independence and comfort. A variety of approaches (eg. Simulation) are used to assist learners to integrate theory from other Level 1 courses


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to the Practical Nursing Diploma Program

For more information visit our timetable

PNS-126 Integrated Nursing Practice 2

Lecture + Lab, 5 credits


This course builds on the foundation of Level 1 and emphasizes the development of clinical decision making, nursing assessments, and interventions to promote the health of older adults. A variety of approaches (eg. Simulation) will help learners to integrate theory from Level 1 and Level 2 courses to provide safe, competent and ethical nursing care with older adults.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Successful completion of Practical Nursing Diploma Level 1 courses and Consolidated Practice Experience I.

For more information visit our timetable

PNS-233 Variations in Health 3

Lecture, 3 credits


This course focuses on the continuum of care and the development of knowledge related to health challenges managed in the community setting. Pathophysiology and nursing care of clients requiring home health care, rehabilitation, and supportive services in the community are explored. As well, cultural diversity in healing approaches are explored along with the incorporation of evidence-informed research and practice.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Successful completion of Practical Nursing Diploma Level 2 courses and Consolidated Practice Experience II.

For more information visit our timetable

PNS-236 Integrated Nursing Practice 3

Lecture + Lab, 4 credits


This course builds on the theory and practice from Level 1 and Level 2. Through a variety of approaches (eg. Simulation), , learners will continue to develop and practice comprehensive nursing assessment, planning for, and interventions with clients experiencing multiple health challenges in a variety of settings.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Successful completion of Practical Nursing Diploma Level 2 course and Consolidated Practice Experience II.

For more information visit our timetable

PNS-246 Integrated Nursing Practice 4

Lecture + Lab, 4 credits


This course emphasizes the development of nursing skills aimed at promoting health and healing with individuals experiencing acute health challenges across the lifespan. A variety of approaches (eg. Simulation) will help learners build on theory and practice from Levels 1, 2, and 3 to integrate new knowledge and skills relevant to the acute care setting.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Successful completion of Practical Nursing Diploma Level 3 courses and Consolidated Practice Experience III.

For more information visit our timetable

SOC-110 Introduction to Sociology I

3 hours lecture or online, 3 credits


This course will introduce students to some of the major concepts, issues, and approaches in the discipline of sociology, including ethnicity, gender or sexuality. The course is designed to encourage the student to think more deeply about the relationship between personal troubles and public issues.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English Studies 12 or English First Peoples 12, ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090; or assessment.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

SSA-101 Introduction to Deep Space Astronomy

3 hours lecture + 3 hours lab, 3 credits


This is a lab science course that will introduce topics in deep space astronomy including: observational astronomy, stars and stellar evolution, galaxies and galactic evolution, neutron stars, black holes, gravitational waves, extra-solar planets, the Big Bang, dark matter, dark energy, and the possibility of life in the universe. This course will also explore related topics in physics and chemistry such as: light and the electromagnetic spectrum, optics, gravity, relativity, cosmology, and the origin of the chemical elements.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 11, First Peoples English 11, or ENG 052.
  • C+ in one of Principles of Math 11, Foundations of Math 11, Pre-Calculus, MAT 053 or MAT 055; or appropriate levels of Math and English placement testing.
  • Take SSA-101L;

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

SSW-120 Foundations of Social Service Practice

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


This course examines the theories and skills specific to the helping roles assumed by social service workers in non-metropolitan and rural communities. Topics include: assessment and case management, the community, natural helping systems and self-help groups, empowerment and change, and problem solving approaches for working effectively with people within a human service framework.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission into the Social Services Diploma or Human Services Diploma or University Transfer students require a C+ or better in Grade 12 English or equivalent, instructor permission and a letter of intent.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

SSW-205 Introduction to Group Work Practice

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


The Introduction to Group Work course explores various theoretical foundations and applied approaches to working with a variety of groups and populations. Effective group leadership will be examined along with a focus on relationships which effect group dynamics.


Prerequisite(s):

  • SSW 150 or EA/CS Certificate or equivalent

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

SSW-210 Community Development

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


This course focuses on the values and skills required for macro level community based human service practice. Students will examine and practice the application of approaches to social change with a focus on preventing, reducing, altering, or eliminating aspects of community life that hinder community development.


Prerequisite(s):

  • SSW 150 or EA/CS Certificate or equivalent

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

TGA-109 Winter Mountain Travel 1

2 credits


This field-focused course includes an introduction to avalanche awareness and winter mountain backcountry touring skills, including one night of winter camping. Students have the opportunity to achieve Avalanche Skills Training One (AST 1).


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to the Adventure Guiding Certificate Program

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

TGA-112 Rock Skills 1

2 credits


This course covers rock climbing and lead climbing skills including movement on rock, belaying, rappelling, simple anchor building, complex anchors, using removable protection and advanced movement skills. Lead climbing skill development will included leading safe pitches with protection placement and planning your ascents to station management, plus some self-rescue techniques. On completion of this course students will feel comfortable going top-rope climbing and beginning to lead climbs on their own in a consistent, safe and confidence inspiring manner.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to the Adventure Guiding Certificate Program

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

THD-121 Introduction to Hospitality Management

3 credits


This course will provide the learners with a fundamental introduction to those enterprises that are typically considered components of the hospitality industry. From hotels to restaurants to cruise lines and clubs, learners will acquire basic knowledge about characteristics, operational differences and the markets they serve. Common themes and topics in the course will include labour issues, trends, marketing approaches and revenue management. Learners will also be introduced to ownership structures including management companies and franchise agreements. Students taking this course cannot receive credit for THM 100 Introduction to Tourism or TMA 120 Introduction to Hospitality Management


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, English Studies 12, ENG -096, ENG-098 or ESL-090; or assessment

For more information visit our timetable

THD-171 Front Office Management

3 credits


In this course, learners will be introduced to the various categories of lodging accommodations and the diverse markets that they serve. The focus of the course will be on the structure, operations and management of the Rooms Division of a hotel, specifically the Front Office. Themes will include how the Front Office fits within the hotel operation, the guest cycle from reservations to checkout, and the basics of housekeeping operations, hotel security and guest safety and revenue management. Through various websites and online documents, learners will also acquire knowledge pertaining to current industry trends including computer applications and software, human resources best practices and lodging design trends. Students taking this course cannot receive credit for THM 107 Accommodating your Guest or TMA 170 Front Desk Procedures


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, English Studies 12, ENG -096, ENG-098 or ESL-090; or assessment

For more information visit our timetable

THD-281 Tourism & Hospitality Managerial Accounting

3 credits


In this course learners will learn to use various accounting tools to make wise business decisions. From profit goals, to cash flow to budgeting, learners will learn how these tools can increase the chances for business success through strategic planning. Learners will be given the opportunity to problem solve through the use of operating ratios, cost-volume profit analysis, pricing approaches and lease accounting. Students taking this course cannot get credit for THM 215 Hospitality and Tourism Managerial Accounting or TMA 280 Hospitality Managerial Accounting.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Successful completionm of THD 111, BUS 100 or other 1st year Financial Accounting course

For more information visit our timetable

THM-107 Accommodating Your Guest

3 credits


In this course we explore the challenges of successfully accommodating our guests in a complex and changing set of tourism environments with ever increasing guest expectations of quality and comfort. Using hotel operations as a foundation we explore the needs of accommodating guests in various other contexts including resorts, cruise ships, B&B's, campgrounds, overnight tours and base camps. Using the "Guest Cycle" as our framework we then review the needs of the guest and their relationship with the accommodation provider before, during and after their stay. This includes the reservations process, check-in, interactions during the stay, accounting and billing, check-out and follow-up. As part of the course students are introduced to one or more scheduling/ rooming systems (Property Management Systems, PMS) used to assist in scheduling guest activities, rooming the guest, billing and guest history.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG 098, ESL 090; or assessment.
  • Completion of PREC-11 or Principles of Math 11; or C in Foundations of Math 11, Applications of Math 11 or MAT-033; or assessment.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

THM-112 Leadership and Management

3 credits


This course is a mix of theory and practical applications. Students will learn about the characteristics and dynamics of modern business organizations and the role of managers and leaders. The use of leadership and management theory, the development of management tools to achieve goals, and learning how to convey information effectively will provide the foundation of this course. The role of leaders and personal approaches to leadership will be explored as a starting point for the students' own leadership development.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090; or English assessment.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

THM-197 Co-operative Ed Internship Work Term

3 credits


This course gives students an opportunity to apply and extend academic knowledge and practical skills while employed with qualified co-op employers. The full-time five-month work experience is facilitated and supervised by the College and includes assignments, based on career development and the work experience, to meet individual educational goals and objectives. Students must complete Co-Operative Education Pre-Employment Seminar (EMP-100) in the Fall term as a prerequistie to this course which is scheduled in the spring term.


Prerequisite(s):

  • EMP 100 plus Completion of a minimum of 24 credits towards the Tourism and Hospitality Managament Diploma.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

THM-275 Food Fundamentals and Service

3 credits


This course is designed to expose students to the inner workings of a commerical kitchen. Students will develop basic cooking skills as well as learn the necessary safety and sanitation considerations that are key to a professional kitchen. In teams, students will have an opportunity to create menus that are both aesthetically pleasing as well as profitable and deliver on those menus in a public setting.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provinical English 12, ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG 098 or ESL 090; or assessment.
  • Completion of Pre-Calculus 11 or Principles of Math 11; or C in one of Foundation of Math 11, Application of Math 11, or MAT 033; or assessment.
  • Foodsafe Level 1

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

WFH-105 Semi-Automatic and Automatic Welding

252 hours


This course encompasses fundamental and intermediate levels of instruction in the use of the most common semi-automatic and automatic wire feed processes. These processes include Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW) including Pulse transfer, Flux Cored Arc Welding (FCAW) including Gas and Self-shielded, Metal Cored Arc Welding (MCAW), and Submerged Arc Welding (SAW). Students will be exposed to the operation of these processes as they relate to carbon steel, stainless steel, and aluminum. The theory component of this course includes the design and operation of various power sources and wire feed mechanisms as well as the different types of transfer modes commonly used. Instruction also includes shielding gases and their effect on weld metal transfer, weld metal chemistry, composition of electrode wires and associated fluxes.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to the Welding Foundation Harmonized Program

For more information visit our timetable

WJC-100 Drafting for Joinery/Cabinetmaking

80 hours


This course will prepare you to produce hand drawn sketches, mechanical drawings, and computer aided drawings used in the design and construction of wood products such as cabinetry, furniture, and kitchen cabinets.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to the Joinery/Cabinetmaking Program

For more information visit our timetable

WJC-130 Wood Finishing for Joinery/Cabinetmaking

77 hours


This course will enable students to safely prepare a solid wood or composite surface for finishing using edge tools and abrasives, colour wood using stains and chemicals, to select and apply topcoats by hand and by spraying, and touch up and repair damaged finishes.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to the Joinery/Cabinetmaking Program

For more information visit our timetable

WPR-110 Gas-Tungsten Arc Welding II (P10)

90 hours


This module teaches the student to become competent in gas-tungsten arc welding (TIG) of low carbon steel, stainless steel and aluminum in all positions.


Prerequisite(s):

  • "C" Level

For more information visit our timetable

WPR-111 Shielded Metal Arc Welding III (P11)

114 hours


This module teaches the student to extend his knowledge and competency in SMAW covering arc welding and testing of welds on low alloy and stainless steel pipe in all positions.


Prerequisite(s):

  • "B" Level

For more information visit our timetable