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ABG-103 Vision, Values, Philosophies And Ethics

3 credits


In this course, students will explore and examine leadership's role in the development of organizational vision, philosphies, values and ethics statements within the larger context of nation building and strengthening existing organizational structures.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission into the Aboriginal Leadership Certificate, or C in Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 096, ENG 098 or ESL 090, or English Assessment.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

ABG-125 Finance

3 credits


This course strengthens students' core skills, knowledge and understanding of systems used in the financial management of various types of contemporary Aboriginal organizations. This includes understanding the unique, historic fiduciary obligations and responsibilities of Canadian governments to Aboriginal peoples.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission into the Aboriginal Leadership Certificate Program or C in Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 096, ENG 098 or ESL 090, or English Assessment.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

ABT-110 Records Management

Online, 1 credit


In today's office, maintaining the integrity of the records system means that all office workers need to be aware of the importance of correct creation, storage, use, retrieval, protection, control, and disposition of records. Technology continues to change the role played by today's office worker. This course will provide the student with the knowledge, skills and abilities to face these challenges and new responsibilities in dealing with both manual and electronic files.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Take ABT 020.
  • English prerequisite for Applied Business Technology Program.
  • Take ABT 100 and ABT 148.

For more information visit our timetable

ABT-148 Business English

Online, 3 credits


This course focuses on correct English usage in a business environment and provides a comprehensive review of grammar, punctuation, and style as well as business spelling and vocabulary development.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Take ABT 020.
  • Take ABT 100.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

AED-020 Career Exploration and Assessment

4 hours lecture/ one-on-one liaison with student and support staff. 64 hours.


Students will learn about various career options and identify their skills, strengths and work interests, as well as any limitation or barriers to employment. Students will also learn about current labour market trends and potential for employment in their local community.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission interview with ASD instructor

For more information visit our timetable

AED-057 Advanced Literacy

75 hours, 2 credits


This course is designed to provide an opportunity for students with higher levels of literacy in the ASD program to study English at a level that will encourage a development of more literacy skills. Students will be exposed to reading and writing at their literacy level. Students will practice writing grammatically correct sentences and paragraphs. Students will read passages and demonstrate comprehension of what they read. Students are involved in determining the content of the course, based on their individual goals. Students assist in the evaluation process through ongoing self-assessment. The course instructor integrates the individual learning goals with the informal and formal assessments.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Documented Cognitive/ Mental health disability; intake interview

For more information visit our timetable

AED-070 Intermediate Computer Skills 2

2 credits


This second Intermediate Computer Skills course will provide students who have taken the first Intermediate Computer Skills course to continue developing their skills. Students will use the internet to do research, gather information and images to create projects on a variety of topics. Students will communicate with email, messenger, share documents, work concurrently on web-based projects and create projects independently. Students should be prepared to work independently and cooperatively.


Prerequisite(s):

  • AED 036, documented cognitive/mental health disability, and intake interview

For more information visit our timetable

AMH-104 General Automotive Practices

90 hours


The course introduces principles of engine operation, fuel systems, emission controls, and hybrid and electric vehicle theory and safety protocols; assessing leaks and servicing gaskets and seals; and learning basic welding techniques.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to the Automotive Service Technician Harmonized Program

For more information visit our timetable

AMH-108 Basic Electrical Systems

126 hours


This course places emphasis on automotive electrical systems. Instruction includes basic principles of electricity, batteries, electronics, engine management, ignition systems, vehicle restraint systems and wiring harnesses; their uses and services requirements.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to the Automotive Service Technician Harmonized Program

For more information visit our timetable

AQT-202 Aquaculture Equipment and Facility Maintenance

3 credits


This course will introduce students to the operation and maintenance of aquaculture facilities and equipment. This course also includes technical mathematical skills and use of MS Excel as applied to physical, chemical and biological aspects of the daily operations in an aquaculture farm site. Basic concepts in aquaculture engineering will be introduced as related to operations and management of specific hatchery facilities and farm sites such as basic systems including electrical, plumbing, water supply, drainage, aeration, and recirculating aquaculture systems. Knowledge and skills on the use of "Fishtalk" and "AquaManager" for data entry and analysis of data in the day to day farm site operations will be introduced. Aquaculture safety and health will be reviewed and student will gain hands on experience with operation and maintenance of equipment used at aquaculture facilities.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to Aquaculture Technician Diploma program.

For more information visit our timetable

ASM-112 Wood Structure & Repair

55 hours


Wood remains an integral part of many aircraft. During this course you will learn to inspect and repair wooden structures. Content includes the properties and strength characteristics of wood, assessment of defects and their influence on strength, decay, joining wood, and the manufacturing of wooden structures.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to the Aircraft Structures Technician Program

For more information visit our timetable

CAMP-LEGO CAMP-LEGO


The NICBotCamp will use LEGO robots to inspire and engage youth in science and engineering pursuits. Students (grades 4 to 6) will participate in fun, hands-on camps during the week, learning basic digital literacy skills including LEGO robotics.


For more information visit our timetable

CAMP-MDSC Mad Scientist Youth Camp


Campers, strap on your safety goggles and prepare to partake in hands on experiments and laboratory demonstrations in this week long camp! Children (ages 10 to 13) can join this camp to expand on their knowledge of the wacky world of science! Campers will explore optics in physics, forces/strength of material in engineering, gooey reactions in chemistry, wonders of life in biology and the basics of coding. A good time will be had by all!


For more information visit our timetable

CFW-101 Indigenours Lands and Culture

4 credits


This course explores the shifting legal and political framework of forest governance in BC which presents both opportunities and challenges for First Nations. Emphasis will be placed on the history of resource development in Canada and BC, Aboriginal and treaty rights, legislation, forest tenures (past, current and future), and cultural heritage values from a regional and an Indigenous perspective. Through guided discussions, the course examines the evolving relationships between Indigenous people, the provincial government, and the forest sector. Acknowledgement: In keeping with North Island College's commitment to Indigenize, we have drawn on the knowledge of representatives from local First Nations across the region we serve in developing this course.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to the Coastal Forest Worker Certificate Program.

For more information visit our timetable

CFW-108 Principles of Forest Engineering

3 credits;


This course introduces students to forest engineering and presents the theory, application and limitations of survey methodologies. With a focus on field competencies, emphasis will be placed on compass and GPS skills, field measurement and correction techniques, effective note taking, mapping, and data management.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission into the Coastal Forest Worker Certificate Program

For more information visit our timetable

CFW-109 Applied Worksite Skills - Practicum

2 credits


This practicum applies the skills learned in the classroom and labs to a specific worksite during a one week practicum. In particular, students will have the opportunity to work alongside forestry workers to hone their skills in one of the following areas: engineering, timber cruising, coastal forest log grading & scaling, silviculture, or forest operations such as: road building, yarding, loading and hauling.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Completion of All other Level 1 CFW courses.

For more information visit our timetable

CHN-101 Introduction to Chinese 1

3 Hours lecture, 1 Hour Lab, 3 credits


This is a Chinese language course designed for beginners. Chinese pronunciation and phonetic system, as well as approximately 200 Chinese characters in Simplified form will be introduced in this course. Students will engage in basic daily conversations such as self-introduction and making phone calls, and be able to write short notes in Chinese at the end of the semester. Students will also explore contemporary culture through "Culture Notes" in each lesson.


For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

CHN-102 Introduction to Chinese 2

3 Hours lecture, 1Hour lab, 3 credits


This is the second course of introductory Chinese designed for beginning learners. More Chinese expressions and grammar, as well as approximately 200 Chinese characters in simplified form will be introduced in this course. Students will be able to engage in conversations on various topics and write longer paragraphs in Chinese by the end of the semester. Students will also explore traditional and contemporary culture through "Culture Notes" in each lesson.


Prerequisite(s):

  • CHN 101 or equivalent

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

CMH-160 Culturl Dimensions of Community Wellness

3 credits


This specialized course is grounded in the history and culture of the local community. This course is designed to support the health and recovery of persons experiencing mental health challenges within that community.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission into the Community Mental Health Worker Program

For more information visit our timetable

COM-021 Building Effective Teams

8.5 hours


Research indicates only one out of five teams are high performing. Learning to work effectively as a team or within a team is critical in today's world. In this highly engaging and interactive course you will learn the key factors and skills required by anyone leading or working within a team. This course introduces some team models, key concepts and practical tools so your team can perform more effectively and achieve extraordinary results.


For more information visit our timetable

Online registration is available for this course. View upcoming start dates and register.

COM-051 Effective Communication

7 hours


In today's competitive business world and difficult economy, effective communication is more essential than ever before. Successful communication has the potential to engage others, strengthen relationships, achieve results, save time and reduce confusion and frustration. Developing an engaging and responsive communication style will lead to positive results for you, your team and your business. This unique, innovative workshop is designed to take your communication skills to the next level.


For more information visit our timetable

CTQ-150 Carpentry Inter-Provincial Trade Qual.

60 hours lecture/lab


Are you doing all of the work of a Journey-person Carpenter but lack the 'ticket'? Join us for this 60 hour course that will delve into the fundamentals and explain the theoretical concepts and practices of the trade. This course will assist carpenters that meet the ITA's criteria to challenge the Certificate of Qualification examination in the trade of Carpenter. The course covers trade mathematics, tools and safety, blueprint reading, layout, materials, formwork and foundations, framing, roof framing, residential standards and finishing. Candidates to challenge the examination require documentation of at least 9,720 hours working in the trade. Details of the ITA's challenge process and its requirements can be found at http://www.itabc.ca/AssetFactory.aspx?did=1837. It is time to put your Red Seal on display!


Prerequisite(s):

For more information visit our timetable

ECC-215 Partnerships - Advanced

60 hours lecture, 4 credits


This course will expand on the foundational knowledge, skills and values discussed in Part II with more emphasis on application of both guiding and caring and working effectively as part of a team with colleagues, families and community. This will include looking at more challenging behaviours and how to use observation and creative problem solving as part of a team to plan effective intervention. Students will take a closer look at what it means to include families in a meaningful way.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Early Childhood Care & Education Certificate or equivalent

For more information visit our timetable

ELC-240 Industrial Control of Chemical Processes

Lecture/lab


The Industrial Electronics Technician must have a good basic understanding of the processes, upon which he or she will be working. It is often necessary to communicate with engineers, operators, and chemists, as well as perform tasks safely. Many industrial processes including Water Treatment, Mining, Pulp and Paper and Combustion Emission systems, involve complex electronic controls and complex chemical reactions such as soda lime water treatment, chlorine, sodium hydroxide, sodium hypochlorite, sodium sulphite, sulphuric and other acids/bases. Students will review basic chemical reactions and learn an overview of chemical processes found in regional industries. This course is 60% lecture and 40% lab.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Electronics Technician Core training or equivalent

For more information visit our timetable

ELE-010 Solar Photovoltaic Systems and The Canadian Electrical CodePLA

8 hours Lecture


This course is for electricians, technologists and engineers with previous education or experience in solar photovoltaic system design who wish to understand the portions of the most recent edition of the Canadian Electrical Code that apply to both utility-tie and off-grid photovoltaic installations. This class covers Section 50, Section 64 and other applicable sections of the CEC. Topics will be introduced through case studies of photovoltaic system designs.


Prerequisite(s):

For more information visit our timetable

ENG-013 Fundamental English Level I

4 - 6 hours lecture, 3 credits


This course teaches skills in pre-reading and reading, pre-writing and writing, spelling, listening and speaking. Students will have individualized instruction in a classroom setting. Students may be matched with a tutor, based on tutor availability and student interest.


Prerequisite(s):

  • English placement testing

For more information visit our timetable

ENG-014 Fundamental English Level 2

4 - 6 hours lecture, 3 credits


This course teaches skills in reading, writing, spelling, listening and speaking. Students will have individualized instruction in a classroom setting. Students may be matched with a tutor, based on tutor availability and student interest.


Prerequisite(s):

  • English placement testing

For more information visit our timetable

ENG-015 Fundamental English Level 3

4 - 6 hours lecture, 3 credits


This course teaches skills in reading, writing, spelling, listening and speaking. Students will have individualized instruction in a classroom setting. After completing English 015, students will enroll in Fundamental English 025. Students may be matched with a tutor, based on tutor availability and student interest.


Prerequisite(s):

  • English placement testing

For more information visit our timetable

ENG-025 Fundamental English Level 4

6 - 7.5 hours lecture, 3 credits


This course teaches skills in reading, vocabulary, spelling, writing, studying, listening, and speaking. Students work within a group setting at the campuses. At the outlying centres, the centre instructor will set up a self-paced program of course work for students on an individual basis. Students can also work with a tutor if needed.


Prerequisite(s):

  • English placement testing

For more information visit our timetable

ENG-026 Fundamental English Level 5

6 - 7.5 hours lecture, 3 credits


This course teaches skills in reading, vocabulary, spelling, writing, studying, listening, and speaking. Students work within a group setting at the campuses. At the outlying centres, the centre instructor will set up a self-paced program of course work for students on an individual basis. Students can also work with a tutor if needed.


Prerequisite(s):

  • English placement testing

For more information visit our timetable

ENG-027 Fundamental English Level 6

6 - 7.5 hours lecture, 3 credits


This course teaches skills in reading, vocabulary, spelling, writing, studying, listening, and speaking. Students work within a group setting at the campuses. At the outlying centres, the centre instructor will set up a self-paced program of course work for students on an individual basis. After completing English 027, students will move to the intermediate English level. Students can also work with a tutor if needed.


Prerequisite(s):

  • English placement testing

For more information visit our timetable

ENG-035 Intermediate English

3 credits


This Intermediate English course is designed to help students learn the skills involved in the writing process, applied grammar, and reading comprehension, and apply these skills to everyday English. Students will gain initial competence in writing a variety of sentence types, paragraphs, and a very basic essay, as well as in reading proficiently at an intermediate level in an academic setting. Students will gain confidence, acquire knowledge, think critially, and upgrade their skills in the three content areas to increase their success in future college courses.


Prerequisite(s):

  • ENG 027 or assessment

For more information visit our timetable

ENG-038 Directed Essential English Studies

1 credit


This seminar/workshop course is designed for students who are upgrading their Essential English skills in order to enter various workplaces or college programs. Students will update their skills via individualized, direct instruction, this obtaining the English skills that are necessary for success.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Assessment and instructor Permission.

For more information visit our timetable

ENG-052 Advanced English

3 hours lecture or distance, 3 credits


Advanced English is designed to provide students with the skills needed for the reading, writing and critical thinking tasks that are required for college programs and employment. Students will develop their communicative abilities via assignments that promote academic and business reading, writing, and research skills.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C+ minimum in one of Provincial English 10, English 10 First Peoples, NIC ENG 032/033/034, ENG-035, or equivalent articulated BC college course, or placement testing. It is strongly recommended that students consider placement testing if prerequisite courses were completed more than five years ago.

For more information visit our timetable

ENG-096 First Peoples Literature And Compositio

3 credits


Through the study of oral and written texts by Indigenous authors, First Peoples Literature and Composition develops critical thinking skills, reading skills, speaking skills, and writing skills to prepare students for the demands of either the workplace, college programs, or university-level courses. Students will write several essays, deliver oral presentations, and complete a research essay or assignment at the conclusion of the course. Students will also explore elements of First People history and culture through the readings and assignments in the course. Credit will only be granted for either ENG 096 or ENG 098.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 11, English 11 First Peoples, ENG 052, or equivalent articulated BC college course, or placement testing. It is strongly recommended that students consider placement testing if prerequisite courses were completed more than five years ago.

For more information visit our timetable

ENG-098 Technical And Academic Writing And Critical Analysis

3credits


English 098 is designed to prepare students for the reading, writing, and critical thinking demands they will encounter in the workplace, college programs or university-level courses. The course assists students to develop reading, research and reference skills and write a range of technical, professional and academic assignments. They will also apply critical thinking skills to situations ranging from problem solving to media literacy. This course satisfies the requirements for English in the ABE Provincial Level Diploma Program. Credit will only be granted for either ENG 096 or ENG 098.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 11, English 11 First Peoples, ENG 052, or placement testing. It is strongly recommended that students consider placement testing if prerequisite course were completed more than five years ago

For more information visit our timetable

ENG-104 Foundations of Academic Writing

3 credits


This course prepares students for the writing, reading, studying, and research demands of post-secondary academic courses. The course will provide instruction in the following: academic language development; the writing of academic paragraphs and essays; how and why to avoid plagiarism; achieving clarity and coherence in writing; planning, researching, drafting, and revising written work; and documentation of research. Note that this course is designed for students who have met the English requirements for admission to their program but who require more experience in academic reading and writing before taking ENG 115, ENG 116, ENG 117 or ENG 160. Students who have completed ENG 115, ENG 116, ENG 117 or ENG 160 with a C+ or higher are not eligible to take ENG 104.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG-098, ENG-096, ESL-090; or English Assessment; or Academic IELTS overall score of 6.0 with no band less than 5.5.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

ENG-107 Introduction to Creative Writing: Fiction & Non-Fiction

3 hours/week, 3 credits


ENG 107 is a first year writing seminar focusing on method and craft in fiction and creative non-fiction. Fiction writing may include short stories or novel writing. Non-fiction may include creative essay writing, documentary, life-writing or biography. Students create a portfolio of work including both fiction and creative non-fiction. This seminar focuses on the practice of writing with an emphasis on learning the craft of writing through discussions, exercises and peer critiquing.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090; or placement testing; or portfolio.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

ENG-108 Introduction to Creative Writing: Poetry & Drama

3 hours/week, 3 credits


ENG 108 is a first year writing seminar focusing on method and craft in poetry drama and screenplays. This seminar focuses on the practice of writing with an emphasis on learning the craft of writing through discussions, exercises, and peer critiquing. Students create a portfolio of work including both poetry and a play or screenplay.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090; or placement testing; or portfolio.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

ENG-115 Essay Writing and Critical Analysis

3 hours lecture, or distance (D), 3 credits


ENG 115 involves the study of university level critical analysis and the production of expository and persuasive writing appropriate to university level discourse across the curriculum. A variety of rhetorical models are studied and practiced. Emphasis is placed on research, documentation and the writing of a research paper. Students may not receive credit for ENG 115 if they have previously completed ENG 116 or ENG 117.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 096, ENG 098, ESL 090, or ENG 160; or English assessment; or Academic IELTS overall score of 6.0 with band scores of 6.0 in Writing and Reading; or completion of ENG 104.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

ENG-116 Essay Writing & Indigenous Perspectives

3 hours lecture, or distance (D), 3 credits


ENG 116 introduces university-level research and writing in the humanities and social sciences and/or natural sciences with a specific focus on contemporary Indigenous issues in Canada. Students will critically analyze and study the writing, oral and aural practices of Indigenous scholars and teachers in a variety of disciplines and settings. Emphasis is placed on respecting and interweaving non-Indigenous and Indigenous ways of knowing and research methodologies in writing a post-secondary research paper. Students may not receive credit for ENG 116 if they have previously completed ENG 115, ENG 117 or ENG 125.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 098, ENG 096, ESL 090 or ENG 160; or English Assessment; or Academic IELTS overall score of 6.0 with band scores of 6.0 in Writing and Reading (Effective for the 2018/19 academic year); or completion of ENG 104.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

ENG-117 Academic Writing

3 hours lecture, or distance (D), 3 credits


This course is an introduction to university-level research and writing in the humanities and social sciences and/or natural sciences. It is designed to help students acquire the research skills and understand the writing practices used by scholars in a variety of academic disciplines. As a way of focusing discussion, students will examine different disciplinary approaches to a single research topic. Note: Credit will only be granted for ENG 115 or ENG 117 or ENG 125.


Prerequisite(s):

  • B in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, NIC ENG 098, ENG 096, ENG 060 or ESL 090, or C or better in any University-transferable English course, or English assessment.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

ENG-122 Reading Literature

3 hours lecture, or distance (D), 3 credits


In this course, you will become familiar with selected writers and their works and themes; develop and understanding of literary terms, techniques, and styles, and analyze fiction, drama, poetry and literary non-fiction using a range of critical approaches. The long-term objective of this course is to gain a greater understanding of yourself and others. You will, as Frederick Nietzsche commands, "Read...your own life and from this understanding the hieroglyphs of universal life!" Students may not receive credit for ENG 122 if they have previously taken ENG 120, ENG 121 or ENG 126.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C+ in Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 096, ENG 098 or ESL 090; or C in ENG 115, ENG 116, or ENG 117; or English Assessment; or Academic IELTS overall score of 6.0 with band scores of 6.5 in Writing and Reading; or completion of ENG 104.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

ENG-127 Indigenous Literatures in Canada

3 hours lecture, or distance (D), 3 credits


English 127 introduces students to Indigenous literatures in Canada with emphasis on their historical, political, and cultural contexts. Students will study works selected from various genres, including story-telling, both oral and written, non-fiction writing, novels, short stories, drama, and poetry, as well as art, film, and digital media. They will learn to write reflective and scholarly analysis by interweaving Indigenous and Western approaches to textual interpretation and literary criticism. Students may not receive credit for ENG 127 if they have previously completed ENG 120, ENG 121 or ENG 126


Prerequisite(s):

  • C+ in Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090; or C in ENG 115, ENG 116, or ENG 117; or English Assessment; or Academic IELTS overall score of 6.0 with band scores of 6.5 in Writing and Reading; or completion of ENG 104.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

ENG-159 Professional Writing

3 hours lecture, or distance (D), 3 credits


English 159 is an applied writing course that recognizes the importance of effective communication in the modern workplace. This course focuses on the study and application of the principles of effective technical and professional communication.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, 12, ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090, or English Assessment, or Admission to Electronics Technician program.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

ENG-160 Effective Organizational Writing

3 hours lecture, or distance (D), 3 credits


English 160 is an applied writing course that focuses on communication skills required in professional and business fields. Students will learn how to use language effectively, produce general correspondence, synthesize research for formal report and proposal writing, and design effective documents.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090; or English Assessment; or Academic IELTS overall score of 6.0 with band scores of 6.0 in Writing and Reading; or completion of ENG 104.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

ENG-166 Effective Organizational Communications

3 credits


ENG 166 focuses on the oral and written communication skills required to function in administrator and leadership positions within Aboriginal organizations and communities. Students will examine and practice the writing process in various capacities specific, but not always limited, to Aboriginal organizations, including email etiquette, minute-taking, briefing notes, and professional letter writing. Students will also learn reporting processes, both written and electronic, with a particular focus in INAC and other provincial and national Aboriginal funding organizations. Finally, students will gain research skills necessary to access and apply to funding sources, and to write formal reports that will include a proposal, executive summary, and formal report with appropriate APA formatting and references. Students may not receive credit for ENG 166 if they have successfully completed ENG 160.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission into the Aborginal Leadership Certificate, or C in ENG 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090; or placement testing; or Academic IELTS overall score of 6.0 with bandscores of 6.0 in Writing and Reading; or completion of ENG 104.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

ENG-202 Survey of English Literature I

3 hours lecture or distance (D), 3 credits


This course surveys significant works of English literature from the late Medieval and Renaissance periods, focusing on major authors: Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, Jonson, Donne, and Milton. Works are studied within the context of the philosophical, social, religious and political thought and conditions of the times.


Prerequisite(s):

  • B in English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 096, ENG 098, ESL 090, or first-year university transfer English.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

ENG-203 A Survey of English Literature II

3 hours lecture or distance (D), 3 credits


This course will survey English Literature of the 18th and 19th centuries, focusing on the works of major authors from a list including Swift, Pope, Blake, Coleridge, Wordsworth, Keats, the Brontes, Eliot, Arnold, Tennyson and Browning. Works will be examined within the context of the philosophical, social and religious aspects of life in the Neo-Classical, Romantic and Victorian Periods.


Prerequisite(s):

  • B in English 12, English First Peoples 12,ENG 096, ENG 098, ESL 090, or C in one first-year university transfer English.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

ENG-207 Creative Non-Fiction

3 hours seminar, 3 credits


ENG 207 is a second year university studies writing workshop that explores the method and craft of creative writing with a focus on creative non-fiction, including creative essay writing, documentary writing, travel writing, life-writing and biography. Students will create a portfolio of work.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C+ in one of the following: English 107, 108, 115, 120, 121, 125, 126, or by portfolio with instructor permission

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

ENG-208 Creative Writing: Poetry

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


ENG 208 is a second year university studies writing workshop that focuses on the method and craft of poetry. Students will be encouraged to explore a variety of styles and structures in their work and will create a portfolio of polished poetry.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C+ in English 108 or by portfolio.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

ENG-209 Creative Writing: Fiction

3 hours lab, 3 credits


ENG 209 is a second year university studies writing workshop that focuses on the method and craft of fiction. Students will examine the work of successful fiction authors and nurture their fiction writing skills through the workshop method. Students will create a portfolio of stories.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C+ in English 107 or by portfolio with the instructor permission.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

ENG-212 Introduction to Canadian Literature I

3 hours lecture or distance (D), 3 credits


This course is a chronological survey of English-Canadian poetry, fiction, and nonfiction from the sixteenth century to the early twentieth century. It focuses on narratives of exploration and encounter, emigration and settlement, and the emergence of Canada as a nation on the world stage. The course explores the questions surrounding the relationship between Canadian literature and national identity. It seeks to include a range of voices and examines works that are representative, not only of the dominant literary culture, but of different regions, ethnicities, histories and gender identities


Prerequisite(s):

  • B in English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 096, ENG 098, ESL 090, or C in one first-year university transfer English.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

ENG-213 An Introduction to Canadian Literature

3 hours lecture or distance; 3 credits


This course introduces students to contemporary Canadian literature including poetry,short fiction and the novel. Key topics may include nationality, regional identity, ethnicity, gender, postcolonial theory, and wilderness vs. urban influences.


Prerequisite(s):

  • B in English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 096, ENG 098, ESL 090, or C in one first-year university transfer English.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

ENG-216 Travel Writing

18 hours lecture, 12-21 days travel, 3 credits


This course combines an intensive survey of contemporarty and historical travel writing with a study and practice of creative writing in fiction and non-fiction genres. The focus will be on the learning of the craft and writing through discussion, exercises and peer critiquing and when possible, travel.


Prerequisite(s):

  • B in English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 096, ENG 098, ESL 090, or C in one first-year university transfer English.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

ENG-224 Women's Literature I

3 credits


English 224 is a survey of literature written in English by women from medieval times to the turn of the 20th century. The focus is on works in a variety of genres, including poetry, short and long fiction, and non-fiction, and on the history of women's writing and the contribution made by women to the English literary tradition.


Prerequisite(s):

  • B in English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 096, ENG 098, ESL 090, or C in one first-year university transfer English.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

ENG-225 Women's Literature II

3 credits


English 225 is a survey of literature written in English by women from the early 20th century to the present. The course will focus on works in a variety of genres, including poetry, short and long fiction, and non-fiction, on the history of modern women's writing, and how the female voice has helped to shape the modern English literary tradition.


Prerequisite(s):

  • B in English 12,English First Peoples 12, ENG 096, ENG 098, ESL 090, or C in one first-year university transfer English.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

ENG-230 Selected Topics in Literature

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


For 2019 Fall, the topic is narrative and digital media. This course introduces the function of narrative and examines narrative method in a variety of genres such as poetry, fiction, drama, biography, autobiography, essay, film, and textbook. The focus of study will vary according to instructor interest and may include themes such as love and sex, war, crime, death, family, or social justice. Students will be introduced to narratology and will examine the ways in which narrative structures shape understanding of the self and the world.


Prerequisite(s):

  • B in English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 096, ENG 098, ESL 090, or C in one first-year university transfer English.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

ENG-260 Advanced Communications And Professional Writing

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


English 260 will give students the opportunity to study the theory and practice of professional writing. Combining readings from the field of professional writing with discipline-specific applications, the course will emphasize the analytical, persuasive, and research skills required to produce effective client-based longer documents, such as analytical reports, persuasive proposals, technical manuals, and case studies. Students will work individually and collaboratively, both in class and on assignments.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C+ in any of one of the following: ENG 115, ENG 120, ENG 121, ENG 125, ENG 160 or permission of instructor

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

ENR-100 Introduction to Engineering I

2 hours lecture, 2 credits


As part of the Engineering Foundations Certificate, this course will cover the role of engineers in society, different engineering disciplines, introduction to the engineering design process, team work in engineering design, sustainability in engineering design, and professional ethics.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to the Engineering Foundations Certificate program

For more information visit our timetable

ENR-101 Introduction to Engineering II

2 hours lecture, 2 credits


As part of the Engineering Foundations Certificate, this course will include practical engineering design skills and practice, including computer aided design and manufacture, rapid prototyping using a variety of materials and fasterners, electronics testing and troubleshooting. The course will include a major design project which will include a microcontroller, with sensors, actuators and fabricated parts to perform an assigned task (in teams of 3 or 4).


Prerequisite(s):

  • Completion of ENR 100

For more information visit our timetable

ENR-151 Engineering Graphics with CAD

3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 3 credits


This course is intended for students in first-year engineering. The course covers the fundamentals of orthographic projection, technical sketching, schematic diagrams, engineering graphic standards and conventions, computer representation of data and problem solving with engineering graphical techniques. Drafting is taught through sketched assignments and assignments performed on computer using CAD software.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in MAT 133 and PHY 120
  • Take ENR-151L

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

ENR-151L Engineering Graphics Lab

3 hours lecture, 3 hours lab, 3 credits



Prerequisite(s):

  • C in MAT 133 and PHY 120
  • Take ENR-151

For more information visit our timetable

ESL-062 Advanced Reading & Writing

8.5 hours lecture, 1.5 hours lab, 4 credits


This highly interactive reading and writing course is of interest to students who wish to enhance their academic English reading and writing skills in preparation for further education and training at NIC. One focus is the development of clear, grammatically accurate and effective written expression for a variety of academic contexts, including transactional letters, paragraphs, and short essays. To this end, points of sentence structure, grammar, punctuation, style, and format will be studied, with special emphasis being given to areas of particular difficulty for ESL students at the advanced level. The second focus of this course is the development of reading, academic, and lexical skills through the study of authentic texts, focused vocabulary work, and an introduction to paraphrasing.


Prerequisite(s):

  • IELTS 5.0 or Assessment by ESL Department

For more information visit our timetable

ESL-065 Advanced Listening & Speaking

8.5 hours lecture, 1.5 hours lab, 4 credits


This highly interactive listening and speaking course is of interest to students who wish to enhance their academic English listening and speaking skills in preparation for further education and training at NIC. One focus is the development of clear, grammatically accurate and fluent spoken expression for a variety of academic contexts, including group work, class discussions, oral presentations, and role-plays. To this end, points of sentence structure and grammar will be studied, with special emphasis being given to areas of particular difficulty for ESL students at the advanced level. In addition, students will improve their pronunciation by learning and practicing the sound, rhythm and stress patterns of English. The second focus of this course is the development of listening and comprehension skills for a variety of contexts, including academic lectures and interviews. Students are encouraged to draw on their personal experience and the information provided through listening materials and/or basic research to discuss and analyze a variety of current and relevant themes. Students will increase their lexical skills and use/comprehension of idiomatic language in addition to gaining academic skills such as note-taking, critical thinking, and basic research skills.


Prerequisite(s):

  • IELTS 5.0 or Assessment by ESL Department

For more information visit our timetable

ESL-092 Coll/Univ Prep Reading & Writing

8.5 hours lecture, 1.5 hours lab, 4 credits


This highly interactive reading and writing course is of interest to students who can already communicate quite comfortably in English but wish to further refine their academic English reading and writing skills to the level required for entry into further education and training at NIC. One focus is the further development of clear, grammatically accurate and effective written expression for a variety of academic contexts, including summaries, longer essays, written responses, and guided research-based writing. To this end, points of increasingly complex sentence structure, grammar, punctuation, style, and format will be studied, with special emphasis being given to areas of particular difficulty for ESL students at the college-entrance level. The second focus of this course is the development of higher level reading and lexical skills through the study of longer authentic texts and focused vocabulary work. Academic skills such as note-taking, summarizing, and reference/citation will also be covered.


Prerequisite(s):

  • IELTS 5.5 or Assessment by ESL Department or C+ in ESL 062

For more information visit our timetable

ESL-095 Coll/Univ Prep Listening & Speaking

8.5 hours lecture, 1.5 hours lab, 4 credits


This highly interactive listening and speaking course is of interest to students who can already communicate quite comfortably in English but wish to further refine their academic English listening and speaking skills to the level required for entry into further education and training at NIC. One focus is the further development of clear, grammatically accurate and fluent spoken expression for a variety of academic contexts, including group work, class discussions, formal presentations, debates, and role-plays. To this end, points of increasingly complex sentence structure and grammar will be studied, with special emphasis being given to areas of particular difficulty for ESL students at the college-entrance level. In addition, students will further refine their pronunciation by learning and practicing higher-level sound, rhythm and stress patterns of English. The second focus of this course is the further improvement of listening and comprehension skills for a variety of contexts, including longer, more complex academic lectures. Students are encouraged to draw on their personal experience and the information provided through listening materials and/or research to effectively discuss and analyze, at some length, a variety of current and relevant themes. Students will further increase their lexical skills and use/comprehension of idiomatic language in addition to honing academic skills such as note-taking, critical thinking, research, and formal presentation skills.


Prerequisite(s):

  • IELTS 5.5 or Assessement by ESL Department or C+ in ESL 065

For more information visit our timetable

FAC-031 Wilderness & Remote First Aid - Challenge

24 hours


This course is the same course as FAC 030, but with higher prerequisites for those who already have solid First Aid skills and therefore require less class time. Students will be required to complete an NIC waiver. (Certification period is three years).


Prerequisite(s):

  • Minimum 13 years of age; current CPR Level C certification with Red Cross Standard First Aid, or WCB OFA Level 2 or 3, or EMT 77 Hour Advanced WorkPlace Level 3 within 6 months prior to course start date, and pre read both books

For more information visit our timetable

FAC-055 Psychological First Aid


This exciting program teaches everyone how to help others experiencing loss, grief and stress, and also self-care. Learners will come away with coping strategies to prevent, identify and deal with stressful events, and they will better understand what supports are available to them and how they can access or help others to access specialized support. This program uses the Red Cross Look, Listen, Link, Live model. The course consists of 3 components: There are two online components you MUST complete before doing the in class portion. The two online portions are Self-Care and Caring for Others which are approximately 45 - 90 minutes each to complete. Then the in class session which is 8 hours in length. PFA is built on the latest evidence-based research from the international community and was developed in response to a growing need within our communities and to address a gap in wellness program options with a focus on resiliency.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Students 18 years of age (recommended)

For more information visit our timetable

Online registration is available for this course. View upcoming start dates and register.

FAC-056 Psychological First Aid - Self-Care


This exciting online program assists learners from youth to seniors in developing a personal understanding of the effects of stress, loss, grief and trauma, with an emphasis on self-care and personal protection. Learners will be introduced to the Red Cross Look, Listen, Link, Live model and will learn how to cope with the effects of various types of stress. This course can be taken as a stand-alone course or in combination with the Psychological First Aid - Caring for Others online course to supplement and strengthen an overall wellness program. We also provide a full program which includes the two online courses and the in class training session. PFA is built on the latest evidence-based research from the international community and was developed in response to a growing need within our communities and to address a gap in wellness program options with a focus on resiliency.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Students 14 years of age (recommended)

For more information visit our timetable

FAC-057 Psychological FAID - Caring for Others


This exciting online program assists learners from youth to seniors in developing a personal understanding of the effects of stress, loss, grief and trauma on others, with an emphasis on caring for others. Learners will be introduced to the Red Cross Look, Listen, Link, Live model and will learn how to support others tocope with the effects of various types of stress. This course can be taken as a stand-alone course or in combination with the Psychological First Aid - Self-Care online course to supplement and strengthen an overall wellness program. We also provide a full program which includes the two online courses and the in class training session. PFA is built on the latest evidence-based research from the international community and was developed in response to a growing need within our communities and to address a gap in wellness program options with a focus on resiliency.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Students 16 years of age (recommended)

For more information visit our timetable

FBR-108 Structural Layout and Development Techniques

20 hours


This course is designed to teach identification of the structural shape used in the structural steel industry, how structural shapes are made at the steel mill and why mill tolerance would need to be taken into consideration. This course also teaches the student the fundamentals of structural template development,and fitting techniques. Also taught are the interpretation of engineer data sheets such as clip placement, hole pitch, hole gauge and edge distance, as well as the interpretation of abbreviations and symbols as used on structural drawings (Blueprints).


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to the Metal Fabrication Program

For more information visit our timetable

FIN-210 Drawing & 2-DIMENSIONAL Language III

4 hours, includes lecture + studio time, 3 credits


In this course students deepen their understanding of representational drawing methods by exploring objective, subjective and conceptual approaches. Students will advance their formal drawing techniques, and utilize it as a means of visual expression. Course projects serve an opportunity for students to engage in research, experimentation, consultation and production. An emphasis will be put on comprehension, analysis, and ability to resolve artistic problems.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Completion of FIN 111

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

FIN-220 Painting Intermediate 1

4 hours, includes lecture + studio time, 3 credits


This course develops awareness in relation to issues in Contemporary Painting. Concepts of visual language within the discipline of painting will be explored and developed using a wide variety of materials, surfaces and forms. Emphasis will be on students' individual development and on enhancing technical skills, thematic development and personal expression. Course projects serve as an opportunity for students to engage in research, experimentation, consultation and production. An emphasis will be put on process, analysis, and ability to expand and resolve artistic problems.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Completion of FIN 121

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

FIN-336 Clay Technology II

1 credit


In this course, students will study the many different types of clay slips, from simple engobes used in many types of decoration, to slip glazes appropriate for once fired soda or salt glazed ware.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Completion of FIN 335

For more information visit our timetable

FIN-345 Kilns and Firing Technology i

2 credits


This course will cover the evolution of kiln design from ancient to contemporary and the advantages of different types of kilns. We will cover refractory materials available and strengths and weaknesses of each, and construction techniques for gas and wood fired kilns. Topics also included will be comparative fuel economy of electricity, gas and wood, and commercially built kilns compared with artist-built kilns


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission into the Professional Potter Advanced Diploma Program.

For more information visit our timetable

FIN-370 Portfolio Development

72 hours, Includes Lecture and Studio Time


This course will bring together the knowledge and skill development gained in previous courses. The aim is to design and develop a line of work of a high enough quality to enter the market place. Students will be challenged to produce good designs, consider the technical requirements for production and finally to make and fire the work.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to the Professional Potter Advanced Diploma Program

For more information visit our timetable

FOR-130 Worksite Readiness Skills


Students will engage in activities fostering the principles of Workplace Diversity and explore conflict, conflict avoidance, and resolution. Career development strategies such as worksite expectation, verbal and non-verbal communication, active listening and team building will be introduced and practiced. The development of computer literacy skills, including word processing, spreadsheet applications and internet search will be a focus of this component.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to the Coastal Forest Resource program.

For more information visit our timetable

FRE-280 La Traduction: Translation (A)

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


This course is an introduction to the practice and theory of translation. Through a comparative analysis of the various structures in both French and English, the course will focus on different techniques and strategies to overcome the problems typically encountered when translating from one language to the other. The focus will be particularly placed on grammar, style and syntax.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG098, or ESL 090; or placement testing.
  • C in FRE-266.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

FRE-281 La Traduction: Translation (B)

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


This course is a continuation to the practice and theory of translation as well as an introduction to the practice of interpreting (simultaneous, consecutive and liaison). Through a comparative analysis of the various structures in both French and English, the course will focus on different techniques and strategies to overcome the problems typically encountered when translating from one language to the other. The focus will be particularly placed on grammar, style and syntax.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090; or placement testing.
  • C in FRE-266.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

GENI-3082 Public Speaking: Transform Nerves & Speak With Power


This workshop teaches practical skills to shift nervous thinking into present moment engagement, access vocal power and range, communicate with clear intention, bring language to life, and speak to the hearts of your listeners. It combines information-packed content with opportunity for practice and 1-1 coaching within an encouraging learning environment that honors individual learning styles, preferences, and comfort zones.


For more information visit our timetable

Online registration is available for this course. View upcoming start dates and register.

GEO-220 Intro to Climate Change: Human And Ecological Dimensions


This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to examining climate change and includes scientific, social, economic, political, and ethical perspectives. Some key areas of focus include climate science, vulnerability of human and ecological systems, observed and projected impacts, climate change adaptation and mitigation, policy debates, and current and future challenges.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG 098, ESL 090, or assessment.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

HCA-110 Health II: Lifestyle & Choices

30 hours lecture, 2 credits


This course provides an introduction to the holistic concept of health and the components of a health-enhancing lifestyle. Students will be invited to reflect on their own experience of health, recognizing challenges and resources that may impact on their lifestyle choices and, consequently, their health. Students will be introduced to a model that can be applied in other courses to understand the multifaceted aspects of health and healing.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to the Health Care Assistant Program

For more information visit our timetable

HCA-115 Healing I: Caring for Individuals Experiencing Common Health Challenges

115 hours lecture, 4 credits


This course introduces students to the normal structure and function of the human body and normal bodily changes associated with aging. Students will explore common challenges to health and healing in relation to each body system. Students will also be encouraged to explore person-centred practice as it relates to the common challenges to health and, in particular, to end-of-life care.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to the Health Care Assistant Program

For more information visit our timetable

HCA-125 Healing 2: Caring for Individuals experiencing Cognitive or Mental Challenges

60 hours lecture, 3 credits


This course builds on content from other courses to assist students to explore concepts and care-giving approaches that will allow them to work effectively with individuals experiencing cognitive or mental challenges. The emphasis in this course supporting clients with dementia, recognizing responsive behaviours and identifying person-centred intervention strategies.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to the Health Care Assistant Program

For more information visit our timetable

HCA-140 Practice Experience I

90 hrs practicum, 4 credits


This supervised practice experience provides students with an opportunity to apply knowledge and skills from all other courses in the program with individuals in a multi-level or complex care setting. A portion of this clinical experience will be devoted to working with individuals experiencing cognitive challenges. Opportunity will be provided for students to gain expertise and confidence with the role of the HCA within a residential care facility.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to the Health Care Assistant Program

For more information visit our timetable

HCA-150 Practice Experience III

120 hrs practicum, 4 credits


This final supervised practice experience provides an opportunity for the learner to become better prepared to take on the role of the Health Care Assistant. This course provides students with a further opportunity to apply knowledge and skills from all other courses in the program with individuals in a multi-level or complex care setting. A portion of this clinical experience will be devoted to working with individuals experiencing cognitive challenges. Opportunity will be provided for students to gain expertise and confidence with the role of the HCA within a residential care facility.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to Health Care Assistant Program. Successful completetion of the appropriate HCA theory courses is required to progress into the Practice Experience.

For more information visit our timetable

HIS-112 Canadian History: 1867 - Present

3 hours lecture, or distance (D); online; Hybrid online + tutorial; 3 credits


This introductory course provides an overview of Canadian history since 1867, concentrating on the main lines of political, social and economic development. It analyses important issues such as the Riel Rebellion, the shift from a rural to an urban society, the effects of the two World Wars, the Great Depression, the relations between English and French Canadians, and provincial demands for autonomy.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 060, ENG 098, or ESL 090; or placement testing. HIS 111 recommended.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

HMC-111 Diesel Engine Removal & Installation

4 hours lecture, 50 hours shop


Introduces students to proper procedures for removal and installation of diesel engines.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to the Heavy Mechanical Foundation program

For more information visit our timetable

HMC-113 Engines & Supporting Systems

8 hours lecture, 9.5 hours shop


Introduction to the various engine support systems including cooling, lubrication and air induction systems.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to the Heavy Mechanical Foundation program;

For more information visit our timetable

HMC-114 Gasoline Fuel Systems

5 hours lecture, 1 hour shop


Introduction to gasoline fuel systems for internal combustion engines.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to the Heavy Mechanical Foundation program;

For more information visit our timetable

HSW-134 Cross-Cultural Community Support

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


This course introduces students to a culturally appropriate approach to working with persons with disabilities. Supports and services that empower persons with disabilities are presented and the strengths of persons with disabilities are emphasized. Issues of devaluation and discrimination towards individuals with disabilities will be identified and discussed. Specific issues surrounding individuals of diverse cultural backgrounds will be discussed. There is a focus on person-centred practice and a strengths perspective.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to the Human Services Certificate - Educational Assistant/Community Support, Indigenous Focus program

For more information visit our timetable

HSW-164 Foundations of Community Support

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


This course introduces students to a diversity model approach regarding persons with disabilities. Supports and services that empower persons with disabilities are presented and the strengths of person with disabilities are emphasized. Issues of devaluation and discrimination of individuals with disabilities will be identified and discussed. There is a focus on person-centered practice and a strengths perspective.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in all first term HSW courses.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

HSW-166 Health Care Principles

3 hours lecture/lab, 3 credits


This course gives an introduction to physical care planning with emphasis on developing physical care skills. Areas of study include basic anatomy and physiology of body systems, basic assessment and physical care skills, common health challenges among persons with physical disabilities, nutrition and food handling, body mechanics. Ethics and legal issues related to health care will also be explored. Community resources for health information and support will be introduced.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in all 1st term HSW courses

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

HSW-250 Advanced Practice Experience

30 hrs/week practicum & 3 hrs/week seminar for 8 weeks, 5 credits


It is expected that the student enrolling in HSW 250: Advanced Practice Experience, is proficient in basic human service worker skills and is ready to move to a more challenging experience. As each practice placement site is unique and may require knowledge and skills specific to its mandate and client population, a contract of learning outcome expectations will be established at the beginning of the practice placement at a meeting between the student, the practice placement supervisor, and the classroom instructor. The student will be supported in her/his learning through weekly seminars.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in all fall Human Services Diploma courses and co-requisite full time enrollment in winter theory courses.

For more information visit our timetable

HTC-102 Hatchery Design and Systems

4 credits


This course introduces students to fundamental hatchery systems and designs. Theoretical and applied instruction will include hatchery site assessment, planning and design considerations and related support system requirements. Instruction also includes engineering concepts applicable to hatchery operations such as basic electrical, plumbing, water supply, drainage, aeration, and recirculating aquaculture systems.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in English 10; or C in two of Composition 10, Creative Writing 10, Literary Studies 10, New Media 10, Spoken Language 10, English First Peoples Writing 10, English First Peoples Literary Studies 10, English First Peoples New Media 10, English First Peoples Spoken Language 10, or NIC ENG-035, or C+ in Communications 12, or C+ in ESL 062 and 065; or successful NIC assessment testing in English; and C in one of Principles of Math 10, Apprenticeship & Workplace Math 10, Workplace Math 10, Foundations of Math & Pre-Calculus 10, Applications of Math 11, NIC MAT-029, or successful NIC assessment testing in math.

For more information visit our timetable

HVA-200 Heavy Duty Equipment Tech Appr - Lv 2

240 hours


NOTE: Effective start date January 2015. This is the Level Two of the four year Heavy Duty Equipment Technician Apprenticeship. This 8 week program covers the following occupational skills; Electrical, Engines and Supporting Systems as it relates to heavy equipment.


Prerequisite(s):

  • ITA Registered Apprentice and successful completion of Module One or Foundation Program. (HVA 100)

For more information visit our timetable

IMG-100 Introduction to PHP

3 hours lecture, 1 hour lab, 3 credits


This practical course introduces students to the development of database-driven web-server applications. PHP (PHP: Hypertext Preprocessor) scripting is used to define the logic and behaviour of student-developed web applications while SQL (Structured Query Language) is used to communicate with the underlying relational database engine. Students will install a development environment to learn and practice essential programming skills and elements of database design and usage.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provinical English 12, English First Peoples 12,ENG 096, ENG 098 or ESL 090; or English assessment.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

IMG-220 Introduction to Social Media


This introductory course will present current platforms, tools and technologies that are used in social media. It will look at communications models, strategies, monitoring, metrics and governance, and the social and cultural significance of social media. This course aims to provide students with the knowledge and skills to effectively explore the opportunities and challenges associated with the use of social media.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, NIC ENG 096, ENG 098, or ESL 090 or English assessment.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

INT-171 Directed Academic/ Career English Studies

3 credits, 45 hours Lec


This course is a seminar/ workshop that develops and deepens students' English language and academic skills through personalized, directed instruction/ learning. Working within a group setting, students develop the linguistic, cultural, and academic skills that they personally need to succeed in their other courses. Each student will work on projects within his or her own area(s) of academic interest.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Students must have English as a second or additional language. Students must be registered in other courses at the UT/ Career Program level.

For more information visit our timetable

INT-172 Directed Academic/ Career English 2 Studies

3 credits, 45 hours Lec


This course is a seminar/ workshop that develops and deepens students' English language and academic skills through personalized, directed instruction/ learning. Working within a group setting, students develop the linguistic, cultural, and academic skills that they personally need to succeed in their other courses. Each student will work on projects within his or her own area(s) of academic interest. This course is appropriate for students who speak and use English as an additional language.


Prerequisite(s):

For more information visit our timetable

INT-173 Directed Academic/ Career English 3 Studies

3 credits, 45 hours Lec


This course is a seminar/ workshop that develops and deepens students' English language and academic skills through personalized, directed instruction/ learning. Working within a group setting, students develop the linguistic, cultural, and academic skills that they personally need to succeed in their other courses. Each student will work on projects within his or her own area(s) of academic interest. This course is appropriate for students who speak and use English as an additional language.


Prerequisite(s):

For more information visit our timetable

LHC-102 Horticulture Equipment


Students will be introduced to hand tools, power tools and measuring equipment used in horticulture. They will learn to identify engine components and practice procedures for identifying, selecting, using and maintaining tools and equipment. Safe operation of common power equipment and the use of personal protective equipment will be practiced.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to the Landscape Horticulture Fundamentals Certificate Program

For more information visit our timetable

LIB-160 Culture, Comm & Global Citizenship

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


This course will provide students with the opportunity to explore what it means to be both a human being and a global citizen within the context of complex intercultural interactions that are either face-to-face or in a virtual environment. Students will be challenged to reconsider their views on what is considered to be legitimate knowledge, "appropriate" ways of being and what it means to communicate well with others. Through critical reflection on historical and current world events, as well as their own values and beliefs, students will be encouraged to develop compassion and empathy for others, a greater appreciation for and understanding of diversity, and a curiosity about other ways of being.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English Frst Peoples 12, ENG 096, ENG 098, ESL 090, or assessment.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

MAT-019 Fundamental Math Level 3

150 hours, 3 credit


This is a self-paced course that teaches students how to multiply and divide. Students also learn how to make change, and convert units of time by adding and subtracting. They are also introduced to the metric system and learn how to measure length, volume, and mass, as well as how to figure out the area of rectangles and squares.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Math 018 or mathematics skills assessment

For more information visit our timetable

MAT-133 Matrix Algebra

3 hours lecture, 1.5 hours tutorial, 3 credits


MAT 133 is an introduction to matrix algebra. It is a required course for students planning to transfer into a University engineering program. Topics include complex numbers, systems of linear equations, matrix operations, determinants, linear transformations, independence, eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Credit will normally be granted for only one of MAT 133 or MAT 200.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C+ in one of Principles of Math 12, Pre Calculus 12, MAT 067 or MAT 060.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

MAT-182 Calculus II

3 hours lecture + 2 hours lab, or distance (D), 3 credits


This course covers: a review of the Fundamental Theorem and area; methods of integration - substitution, integration by parts, trigonometric integrals, trigonometric substitution, partial fractions, and trapezoidal rule; introduction to differential equations; applications of integration - volume, arc length; L'Hospital's rule and improper integrals; infinite sequences and series, tests of convergence for infinite series, Taylor polynomials and series, and applications. Students will use a computer algebra system in the lab to improve their conceptual understanding, aid visualization, and to solve problems.


Prerequisite(s):

  • MAT 181 with a minimum of Grade D

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

MEC-015 Small Engine Maintenance

36 Hours


Learn theory, uses and operation of 2 and 4 stroke gas engines. Learn proper tool use and explore mechanical, electrical and fuel systems of small engines.


For more information visit our timetable

MED-032 Domestic Vessel Safety (DVS)


In addition to topics covered by the Basic Safety (SDV-BS) course, this Transport Canada approved course enables you to learn safety-related skills associated with small boat operation and ensuring the safety of passengers. These skills include assisting passengers to survive an emergency, maintenance of safety equipment, and safety record keeping. Note: Bring a towel and bathing suit for pool exercises.


Prerequisite(s):

For more information visit our timetable

Online registration is available for this course. View upcoming start dates and register.

MJD-111 Northwest Coast First Nations Art & Engraving I


This course will focus on students learning the traditional skill of engraving precious metals to produce either First Nations or contemporary-themed work. Students will learn to prepare their own engraving tools, practice hand engraving, and even try their hand on the Gravermax engraving system. Students will have the opportunity to explore the history of Indigenous design and the nature of Northwest Coast First Nations art. The use of First Nations designs and the political and cultural aspects of "appropriation" as it relates to Indigenous culture will be discussed.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to the Metal Jewellery Design Certificate Program.

For more information visit our timetable

MJD-121 NW Coast First Nations Art & Engraving II


This course will be a continuation of Northwest Coast First Nations Art & Engraving I. Students will learn more about the history of Indigenous design and continue to work on engraving techniques in either traditional or contemporary designs.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Take MJD-111 - First Nations Art & Engraving I.

For more information visit our timetable

NAU-005 Small Vessel Operator Proficiency Training Course

26 hours


Gain the knowledge and skills required to operate small commercial vessels, other than tugs and fishing vessels, up to five gross tonnage engaged on a near coastal, class 2 or a sheltered waters voyage, and for fishing vessels up to 15 gross tonnage or 12 meters overall length engaged on a near coastal, class 2 (including an inland voyage on Lake Superior or Lake Huron) or a sheltered waters voyage.


Prerequisite(s):

For more information visit our timetable

Online registration is available for this course. View upcoming start dates and register.

NAU-014 Master, Limited/ Fishing Master IV

105 hours


This course is for those working towards their Master, Limited or Fishing Master, IV Class certification. The Master Limited certificate is required by masters of vessels up to 60 gross tonnage and is valid on passenger carrying vessels, work boats, and tugs of less than 60 gross tons. The Fishing Master, IV Class certificate is for masters of fishing vessels of not more than 100 gross tons engaged on near-coastal or sheltered waters voyages; or officer in charge of the watch of a fishing vessel of any tonnage engaged on near-coastal and sheltered waters voyages. This comprehensive course prepares mariners for writing two core Transport Canada exams, Navigation Safety Level 1 and Chartwork & Pilotage Level 1.


Prerequisite(s):

For more information visit our timetable

Online registration is available for this course. View upcoming start dates and register.

NCN-096 Introduction to Nuu-chah-nulth Language

3 credits


Introduction to Nuu-chah-nulth Language will focus on: listening techniques, comparing and contrasting Nuu-chah-nulth and English sound patterns and pronunciation, which will lead to words, phrases and sentence-building exercises for conversational Nuu-chah-nulth for various topics: greetings, weather, elders, around the classroom, around the house, and learning songs. Students will also be introduced to electronic learning resources for self-practice.


Prerequisite(s):

  • None

For more information visit our timetable

NCN-097 Introductory Nuu-chah-nulth Language 2

3 credits


Introdction to Nuu-chah-nulth Language II will focus on advancing skills learned in Nuu-chah-nulth I: listening techniques, comparing and contrasting Nuu-chah-nulth and English sounds, patterns and pronunciation which will lead to words, phrases and sentence building exercises for conversational Nuu-chah-nulth for various topics. In addition, there will be an introduction to Nuu-chah-nulth cultural protocols. Students will explore any new electronic learning resources for self-practice.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Take NCN-096 Introduction to Nuu-chah-nulth Language;

For more information visit our timetable

NUR-105 Health and Healing I: Living Health

3 hours seminar +3 hours learning center, 6 credits


This course is an introduction to the meaning of health including personal health, family health, community health and societal health. Participants examine significant theoretical and conceptual frameworks of health including health promotion, primary health care, prevention and determinants of health. By reflecting on personal experiences, participants have the opportunity to identify personal resources and/or challenges that impact health as well as recognize the diversity of beliefs, values and perceptions of health held by others. Opportunities to learn basic health assessment skills are included in this course.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Admission to the Nursing Program

For more information visit our timetable

NUR-170 Health and Healing Bridge - In

3 credits


This course is an introduction to the meaning of health including personal health, family health, community health and societal health. Participants examine significant theoretical and conceptual frameworks of health including health promotion, primary health care, prevention and determinants of health. Participants have the opportunity to identify personal resources and/ or challenges that impact health as well as recongnize the diversity of beliefs, values and perceptions of health held by family and community health assessment. Participants will have opportunities to explore and critique various theoretical and conceptual frameworks in relation to health assessment including early childhood development, family development, healthy aging and community development. The concept of assessment within the context of decision making is explored.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Practical Nursing Diploma or Practical Nursing Certificate and 900 hours of practice within the past five years. Current and active registration as an LPN in British Columbia or the Northwest Territories.
  • Take NUR-173

For more information visit our timetable

NUR-175 Consolidated Practice Experience I

Practice and Learning Center, 6 credits


The transitional practice experience is designed to assist students to move forward with the health focus of year one towards the focus on health challenges in year two. Hence this practice experience consists of two parts: two weeks in the nursing learning centre to practice skills that are foundational to providing personal care, and two weeks in a practice setting where students will have the opportunity to practice personal care while furthering the development of their assessment skills and their understanding of health and health promotion.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Successful completion of Term 2

For more information visit our timetable

NUR-204 Nursing Practice III: Promoting Health And Healing

2 hours seminar + 10 hours practice, 6 credits


This nursing practice experience provides opportunities to develop caring relationships with individuals and families for the purpose of health promotion while coming to understand their unique health and healing processes. Participants will have opportunities to practice nursing approaches that accompany this understanding. Participants work with families and individuals experiencing common health challenges (both episodic and chronic) in the home and community, in agencies, and in care facilities to incorporate concepts and learning from all the courses in this semester into their nursing practice. The community and society are considered as contextual influences on the promotion of health and healing for the individual and the family.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Successful completion of year 1

For more information visit our timetable

NUR-206 Health And Healing III: Health Challenges/Healing Initiatives

3 hours seminar, 3 hours learning centre, 6 credits


Building on the learners' understanding of health, the focus of this course is on people's experience with healing for both chronic and episodic health challenges. Participants integrate theory and concepts of health as they relate to healing. This course is complementary to Health Sciences III and provides opportunities for learners to integrate pathophysiology with their understanding of health and healing and the nursing approaches that accompany this understanding.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Successful completion of year 1

For more information visit our timetable

NUR-214 Nursing Practice IV: Promoting Health and Healing

2 hours seminar +10 hours practice, 6 credits


This nursing practice experience continues to provide opportunities for learners to develop caring relationships with individuals and families for the purpose of health promotion while coming to understand their health and healing processes when experiencing more complex health challenges, both episodic and chronic. Participants will have opportunities to practice nursing approaches that accompany this understanding. Participants work with families and individuals in the home and community, in agencies, and in care facilities to incorporate concepts and learning from all the courses in this semester into their nursing practice. The community and society are considered as contextual influences on the promotion of health for the individual and the family.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Successful completion of Term 3

For more information visit our timetable

NUR-216 Health and Healing IV: Health Challenges/Healing Initiatives

3 hours seminar,3 hours learning centre, 6 credits


Participants in this course continue to develop an understanding of people's experience with healing related to a variety of increasingly complex chronic and episodic health challenges within a variety of practice contexts. This course is complementary to Health Sciences IV and provides opportunities for learners to integrate pathophysiology with their understanding of health and healing and the nursing approaches that accompany this understanding.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Successful completion of Term 3

For more information visit our timetable

NUR-276 Consolidated Practice Experience II

8 weeks (192 hours) practice, 8 credits


In this consolidated practice experience, opportunities are provided to develop caring relationships for the purpose of healing and health promotion with individuals and families experiencing increasingly complex chronic and episodic health challenges. The community and society are considered as contextual influences on the promotion of health for the individual and the family. Participants have opportunities to consolidate learning from the first and second year of the program in a variety of settings.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Successful completion of Term 4

For more information visit our timetable

NUR-302 Relational Practice III: Connecting Across Difference

3 hours seminar, 3 credits


Building on the concepts introduced in Relational Practice I and II and other previous courses, Relational Practice III provides a synthesis of knowledge that is the basis of critical analysis. This course focuses on enhancing participants' everyday relational practice with individuals, families, and groups. The emphasis is on engaging with the complexities of difference in everyday nursing practice and the challenges these complexities might pose for being in-relation with clients.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Successful completion of Year 2

For more information visit our timetable

NUR-306 Health and Healing V: Complex Health Challenges/Healing Initiatives

3 hours seminar, 3 hours learning center, 6 credits


This course builds on Health and Healing I and II and Health Sciences III and IV and provides opportunities for participants to build on their nursing knowledge and understanding of health and healing in relation to complex episodic and chronic health challenges. This advanced course will focus on current topics and emerging knowledge related to a variety of health care contexts.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Successful completion of Year 2

For more information visit our timetable

NUR-318 Health And Healing VI: Global Health Issues

3 hours seminar, 3 credits


Participants in this course continue to develop an understanding of people's experience with health and healing related to a variety of increasingly complex chronic and episodic global health challenges and issues. Emphasis is placed on the role of the nurse as care provider, community organizer/facilitator, educator and advocate within the context of the global society and the changing health care environment. Participants examine a variety of emerging health issues and trends using these as a context for further developing their personal understanding of nursing practice that supports meaningful interactions with individuals, families, groups, communities and society.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Successful completion of Term 5 or admission to Option B

For more information visit our timetable

NUR-404 Nursing Practice VI: Engaging in Leadership

1 hour seminar, 8 hours practice, 4 credits


This nursing practice experience provides opportunities for participants to further develop their competencies in the areas of leadership, influencing and managing change, and the utilization of research for the purpose of promoting the health of individuals, families, communities and society, within the context of the Canadian health care system. This nursing practice experience focuses on participants' growth in their practice as professional nurses. They have opportunities to explore inter-professional practice and nursing leadership in the context of emerging Canadian and global health issues and trends.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Successful completion of Term 6 or admission to Option B

For more information visit our timetable

NUR-410 Health & Wellness in Aboriginal Communities

30 hours seminar + 12 hours online, 3 credits


This course will examine concepts of Aboriginal health and healing using Aboriginal processes and ways of knowing for curriculum construction and delivery. It will include pre and post assignments and 5 consecutive days learning in an Aboriginal Community within the college region. Students will explore the Aboriginal world view of health and wellness and will examine the historical and contemporary significance of health issues for Aboriginal communities through interaction with local elders and community representatives. This course will also examine the nurse's role with individuals, families and communities from social justice and cultural safety perspectives. Participants will have the opportunity to explore their own relational practice through reflection on their own ethnocentricities and personal meanings and through active engagement with Aboriginal community members and processes.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Successful completion of Term 6 of the BSN Program or admission to Option B of the BSN Program or 3rd Year standing in the BSN Program with Instructor permission. The course is also open to Registered Nurses who are employed by an Aboriginal Health Authority.

For more information visit our timetable

NUR-414 Nursing Practice VIII: Transitioning to BSN Graduate

18 hours seminar, 16 weeks practice (560 hours) , 12 credits


This nursing practice experience provides opportunities for participants to consolidate their learning and prepare for assuming the role of BSN graduate. Participants also explore and critique changes and issues in the health care system, and the workplace, that affect nurses. Participants develop their nursing competencies and enhance their nursing knowledge so that they may practice in a variety of settings at a novice level. Participants may choose to focus their practice within a specific area, for example, a particular setting of practice, a certain client population, or a specific health challenge.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Successful completion of Term 7 or admission to Option B

For more information visit our timetable

NUR-420 Advanced Pharmacology in Nursing Practice

3 hours seminar, 3 credits


This pharmacology course provides the opportunity for students to consolidate their learning of the medications used in the management of common acute and chronic health challenges across the life-spans. An overview of alternative medicine as a complement to conventional medicine is included. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic principles, as well as the nurse's role in drug therapy, are integrated as a means to maximize therapeutic efficacy and minimize adverse drug reactions. Ethical, economic and legal issues, regarding medications are addressed.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Successful completion of Term 6 or admission to Option B or 3rd Year standing with Instructor Permission

For more information visit our timetable

OFA-032 Occupational First Aid Level 3 Renewal

42 hours


This course is for Occupational First Aid Level 3 First Aid attendants who prefer not to take the full OFA 030 course, but would like to attend a few classes as a refresher before challenging the Level 3 exam. Homework assignments must be completed before the first class. Note: This course is offered in accordance with WSBC Regulations Part 3 Guidelines (3.14 - 3.21) All studentswill be required to complete an NIC waiver form. Certification is by WSBC for a period of three years.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Students must have or have had a WSBC Occupational First Aid Level 3 ticket or equivalent certification (i.e.: EMP 76 Hour Advanced WorkPlace Level 3 Supplement ticket). Students under 19 years of age require a parent/ guardian signed wavier. Pre-reading and homework required, contact First Aid Dept at 250-334-5092 to arrange to get course materials.

For more information visit our timetable

Online registration is available for this course. View upcoming start dates and register.

PCA-202 Fine Dining Apps & Hors D'Oeuvres d'oeuvres

2 credits


Students will receive instruction on the principles of specialty appetizer and hors d'oeuvre preparation with instruction encompassing salads, dressings, condiments, accompaniments, and platter presentation. Students will engage in the preparation of elegant appetizers and hors d'oeuvres during their lab, and for special events and Café service.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Acceptance into the program.

For more information visit our timetable

PHY-141 Mechanics I (Statics)

3 hours lecture, 1.5 hours tutorial, 3 credits


This course is an introduction to engineering mechanics for students planning to transfer into a University engineering program. The course introduces a methodology for analysis of forces and moments acting on, or within, rigid bodies, structures and machines that are in static equilibrium. Topics include conditions of equilibrium and applications to particles and rigid bodies; analysis of structures, including beams, trusses and arches; bending moment and shear force diagrams for beams; dry friction.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in MAT 181 and MAT 133.
  • Corequisite: MAT 182.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

PHY-170 Engineering Mechanics 1: Statics and Dynamics

3 hours lecture, 1.5 hours tutorial, 3 credits


This course is an introduction to engineering mechanics for students planning to transfer into engineering at UBC. Students will study the statics, kinematics and dynamics of particles and rigid bodies. They will apply vector analysis to three-dimensional static-equilibrium problems, and differential and integral calculus to dynamics problems, as well as make use of Newton's laws and the concepts of impulse, momentum, work and energy. Students will focus on the analysis of practical mechanics problems in two and three dimensions.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in MAT 181 and MAT 133.
  • Corequisite: MAT-182.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

PNS-121 Professional Practice 2

Lecture, 1.5 credits


This course examines the legislation influencing Practical Nursing practice with clients experiencing chronic illness and those in residential care settings. Specific professional issues such as responsibility, accountability, ethical practice, and leadership relevant to the Practical Nursing role in residential care will be explored. Critical thinking and decision making specific to the care of clients withchronic health challenges and interprofessional practice are also addressed.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Successful completion of all Level 1 courses and Consolidated Practice Experience 1.

For more information visit our timetable

PNS-123 Variations in Health 2

Lecture, 3 credits


This course focuses on pathophysiology as it relates to the ageing process and selected chronic illness. The main focus is on the care of the older adult experiencing a health challenge. Cultural diversity in healing practices are explored as well as evidence-informed research and practice.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Successful completion of Practical Nursing Diploma Level 1 courses and Consolidated Practice Experience I.

For more information visit our timetable

PNS-233 Variations in Health 3

Lecture, 3 credits


This course focuses on the continuum of care and the development of knowledge related to health challenges managed in the community setting. Pathophysiology and nursing care of clients requiring home health care, rehabilitation, and supportive services in the community are explored. As well, cultural diversity in healing approaches are explored along with the incorporation of evidence-informed research and practice.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Successful completion of Practical Nursing Diploma Level 2 courses and Consolidated Practice Experience II.

For more information visit our timetable

PNS-236 Integrated Nursing Practice 3

Lecture + Lab, 4 credits


This course builds on the theory and practice from Level 1 and Level 2. Through a variety of approaches (eg. Simulation), , learners will continue to develop and practice comprehensive nursing assessment, planning for, and interventions with clients experiencing multiple health challenges in a variety of settings.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Successful completion of Practical Nursing Diploma Level 2 course and Consolidated Practice Experience II.

For more information visit our timetable

PNS-246 Integrated Nursing Practice 4

Lecture + Lab, 4 credits


This course emphasizes the development of nursing skills aimed at promoting health and healing with individuals experiencing acute health challenges across the lifespan. A variety of approaches (eg. Simulation) will help learners build on theory and practice from Levels 1, 2, and 3 to integrate new knowledge and skills relevant to the acute care setting.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Successful completion of Practical Nursing Diploma Level 3 courses and Consolidated Practice Experience III.

For more information visit our timetable

SFQ-106 Shellfish Aquaculture Field School

3 credits


This course provides each student with the opportunity to develop their skills within a shellfish farm site. Students will engage in daily farm activities at industry worksites and acquire practical knowledge of farm operations.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Successfully complete all other SFQ courses except SFQ 107. (SFQ 100 - SFQ 105)

For more information visit our timetable

SPN-200 Intermediate Spanish I

3 hours lecture + 1 hour lab, 3 credits


This course is designed to further expand students' language skills in Spanish as well as their awareness of the Hispanic culture. It focuses on real communication in meaningful contexts to develop and strengthen students' speaking, listening, reading and writing skills while introducing them to the richness of Hispanic literature and culture.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C+ in SPN 101 or instructor determined equivalent.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

SPN-201 Intermediate Spanish II

3 hours lecture + 1 hour lab, 3 credits


This course is designed to further expand students' language skills in Spanish as well as their awareness of the Hispanic culture. It focuses on real communication in meaningful contexts to develop and strengthen students' speaking, listening, reading and writing skills while introducing them to the richness of Hispanic literature and culture.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C+ in SPN 200

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

SSW-123 Advanced Interpersonal Skills Practice

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


Building on the content of SSW 121, this course will continue to explore relationship based help in the Human Services using a strengths based approach to promote positive growth and change with individuals. Students will develop advanced communication strategies including skills necessary to promote problem solving, working with difficult clients, and further student self-awareness as communicators.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C minimum in SSW 121

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

SSW-201 Family Relationships

3 hours lecture, 3 credits


This course provides an overview of the family experience in contemporary Canadian society. It provides a foundation which will assist the student in understanding and working with families or individuals within a family unit. Students will be introduced to various theories about family structure and function, stages of family development, impact of a rapidly changing society on families, problem situations, family relationships, and basic strategies for assisting families to function using a strengths based approach that promotes psychological well-being. Further, students will explore the importance of family in their own and the lives of others and will appreciate how family experiences effect emottional and social functioning.


Prerequisite(s):

  • SSW 150 or EA/CS Certificate or equivalent

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

SSW-250 Advanced Practice Experience Social Services

30 hrs/week practicum & 3 hrs/week seminar for 8 weeks, 5 credits


It is expected that the student enrolling in SSW 250: Advanced Practice Experience in Social Services is proficient in basic social service worker skills and is ready to move to a more challenging experience. As each practice placement site is unique and may require knowledge and skills specific to its mandate and client population, a contract of learning outcome expectations will be established at the beginning of the practice placement at a meeting between the student, the practice placement supervisor, and the classroom instructor. The student will be supported in her/his learning through weekly seminars.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C minimum in all second year Social Services Diploma courses with co-requisite enrollment in all second year winter theory courses.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

THD-111 Introduction to Hospitality Fianancial Accounting

3 credits


The Introduction to Hospitality Financial Accounting course is designed to provide the learner with a basic working knowledge of accounting principles and practices commonly used in the hospitality industry. Learners will be introduced to such concepts as financial statements, accounting cycles, balance statements and cash flow as well as how to forecast sales and budget for expenses. A common theme throughout the course will be an emphasis on sound accounting practices and accounting challenges particular to the hospitality sector. Students taking this course cannot receive credit for BUS 100 Financial Accounting Fundamentals, TMA 100 Hospitality Financial Accounting 1 or TMA 275 Hospitality Financial Accounting


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, English Studies 12, ENG -096, ENG-098 or ESL-090; or assessment C in one of Applications of Math 11 or Foundations of Math 11; or B in Apprenticeship and Workplace Math 11 or Workplace Math 11 or MAT 033, or completion of Principles of Math 11 or Pre-calculus 11

For more information visit our timetable

THD-200 Restaurant Operations

3 credits


The main theme of this course is to expose learners to operational strategies and management practices within the restaurant industry. Through this course, learners will acquire knowledge of the various types of operations including commercial and non-commercial operations. Topics and themes covered in this course will include marketing strategy, menu engineering, facility design, sanitation and safety and financial management. Through case studies and discussion questions learners will be encouraged to use their own experiences as a consumer or as an employee to critically analyze various operations. Students receiving credit for this course cannot receive credit for TMA 059 Food & Beverage Management.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, English Studies 12, ENG -096, ENG-098 or ESL-090; or assessment

For more information visit our timetable

THM-107 Accommodating Your Guest

3 credits


In this course we explore the challenges of successfully accommodating our guests in a complex and changing set of tourism environments with ever increasing guest expectations of quality and comfort. Using hotel operations as a foundation we explore the needs of accommodating guests in various other contexts including resorts, cruise ships, B&B's, campgrounds, overnight tours and base camps. Using the "Guest Cycle" as our framework we then review the needs of the guest and their relationship with the accommodation provider before, during and after their stay. This includes the reservations process, check-in, interactions during the stay, accounting and billing, check-out and follow-up. As part of the course students are introduced to one or more scheduling/ rooming systems (Property Management Systems, PMS) used to assist in scheduling guest activities, rooming the guest, billing and guest history.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of Provincial English 12, English First Peoples 12, ENG 060, ENG 096, ENG 098, ESL 090; or assessment.
  • Completion of PREC-11 or Principles of Math 11; or C in Foundations of Math 11, Applications of Math 11 or MAT-033; or assessment.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

THM-175 Mixology & Oenology

3 credits


This course is a combination of theory, demonstration and practical experience in the classroom, bar lab and through field trips and guest speakers. The course includes general product & service knowledge of alcoholic & non-alcoholic beverages. It also provides the students with the ability to prepare standard classic cocktail recipes, apply basic bar operating procedures, and learn skills to properly engage the guest at a beverage establishment. Students also increase their industry regulatory knowledge through a detailed understanding of responsible alcohol service - Serving It Right certification.


For more information visit our timetable

THM-211 Sustainable Tourism Industry

3 credits


This specialized course provides an overview of the challenges facing tourism managers and operators in today's environmentally sensitive marketplace. We explore the relationship between tourism, recreation, and the management of tourism business in conjunction with the natural resources being utilized and the participants and managers of that resource. Industry, stakeholder, and government speakers representing their organizations' perspective will represent a large portion of the class.


Prerequisite(s):

  • C in one of ENG 115, ENG 160 or ENG 117. May be taken as corequisites.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

THM-225 Cross Cultural Tourism

3 credits


This course is aimed at increasing participant's awareness of and sensitivity toward their own and other cultures and challenging participants to view themselves as cultural beings. This course develops knowledge and demonstrable skills competence in cross-cultural settings and increases participant's knowledge of issues related to cultural sustainability within the context of tourism activity.


Prerequisite(s):

  • ENG 115, ENG 160 or ENG 117. May be taken as corequisites. Minimum Grade C

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

THM-250 International Hotel Management

3 credits


The scope of the international hospitality industry provides future managers with both opportunities and challenges. Students in this course will gain an appreciation of the complexities of managing and leading international operations - from how operations are structured to how culture impacts all facets of the business environment.


Prerequisite(s):

  • ENG 160, ENG 115 or ENG 117 and THM 112 or BUS 150. Minimum grade C

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

THM-320 Directed Independent Studies in Tourism

3 credits


This course provides students with an opportunity to engage in independent research or study outside of the traditional classroom environment. Working under the supervision of a Tourism faculty member students can develop research skills and integrate theoretical knowledge with practical experience in an applied setting. Once a project has been agreed upon, the student is responsible for developing an independent work plan which will include timelines, outcomes that fall within criteria established by the Dept. and agreed upon evaluation tools. This course is unique in that students have the flexibility to pursue projects of personal interest of to participate in existing regional or international projects and receive credit for their work.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Permission of the Department; Minimum of 15 credits in either the Tourism and Hospitality Management Diploma or Global Tourism and Hospitality Management Advanced Diploma; C in either ENG 115 Essay Writing and Critical Analysis or ENG 160 Effective Organization Writing.

For more information visit our timetable

For information about transferability: BCTransferGuide.ca 

WSR-080 Welding Skills Development Theory - 4 Weeks

120 hours


This four week course is for welders who require additional classroom time to complete theoretical assignments or examinations in order to complete their C, B or A Level studies. This course does not provide opportunity to engage in practical activities in the welding shop.


Prerequisite(s):

  • Registered in welding and instructor permission

For more information visit our timetable