Skip to content

Joy of Lifelong Learning Courses

Joy of Lifelong Learning Courses

Academic courses available to students 55+ for reduced rates.

See the Joy of Lifelong Learning page for eligibility, application forms and more.

Click a title to view course descriptions, location and scheduling information.

Areas of Study

HUMANITIES & SOCIAL SCIENCES
ANT 150 Cultural Anthropology

This audio-visual course focuses on the cross-cultural study of human diversity. Topics include patterns of subsistence, linguistics, social, political and economic organization, religion, aesthetics, and the future of humanity. Details...

Location:
  • Campbell River Campus
  • Comox Valley Campus
  • Port Alberni Campus
  • Port Hardy Campus
ANT 151 Physical Anthropology & Archaeology

This course is an introduction to the sub-fields of anthropology: physical anthropology and archaeology. Through readings and audio-visual material, the origins and development of humans and their cultures are explored, including the development of the civilizations of the Old and New World. Details...

Location:
  • Campbell River Campus
  • Comox Valley Campus
  • Port Alberni Campus
  • Port Hardy Campus
  • Port McNeill Centre
ANT 250 Ethnology of North America

An examination of traditional and post-contact aboriginal societies using a culture area approach. This background will lead to consideration of the status of Aboriginal People in contemporary Canadian Society. Details...

Location:
  • Campbell River Campus
  • Comox Valley Campus
  • Port Alberni Campus
  • Port Hardy Campus
ANT 251 Principles of Archaeology

This course surveys the methods and theoretical conceptions which archaeologists use to interpret world prehistory using selected sites from throughout the world. Weather permitting, location and excavation of a contemporary site may be attempted. Details...

Location:
  • Campbell River Campus
  • Comox Valley Campus
  • Parksville High School
  • Port Alberni Campus
  • Port Hardy Campus
ANT 260 Forensic Anthropology

This is an introductory course of forensic anthropology, a branch of physical anthropology. Forensic anthropology involves human osteology, and is directed towards identifying human remains for legal purposes. Students will learn to assess through physical remains the sex, stature, and 'age at death' of human specimens, as well as the validity of determining 'genetic heritage'. Students will learn to understand how teeth and bones can give evidence of behaviourial patterns, trauma and disease, and how to assess cause and manner of death, and the effect of a postmortem interval on determining the above. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
CRM 101 Introduction to Criminology

An introduction to the core concepts, basic data sources, and general research findings in the field of Criminology. A key focus is on elements of continuity and discontinuity between traditional and contemporary theories of crime, deviance, criminality, and social control. Particular attention is paid to the Canadian context. Details...

Location:
  • Campbell River Campus
  • Comox Valley Campus
  • Port Alberni Campus
CRM 131 Introduction to the Criminal Justice System

An introduction to the structure and operation of the Canadian criminal justice system, including the police, courts, and corrections. Analysis of the patterns of crime and victimization, police discretion and decision-making; criminal sentencing; correctional institutions and community-based models; and the youth justice system. Patterns of contact and conflict between various social groups and the criminal justice system are also examined. Details...

Location:
  • Campbell River Campus
  • Comox Valley Campus
  • Port Alberni Campus
  • Port Hardy Campus
CRM 135 Introduction to Canadian Law & Legal Institutions

An introduction to the fundamental principles or jurisprudence and the basic legal institutions of Canada. An examination of the history of Canadian law, the development of the Canadian constitution, the system of Canadian courts, and the roles and responsibilities of members of the legal profession. In addition, an analysis of the nature of legal reasoning, the doctrine of precedent, and the principles of statutory interpretation. Also introduces the fields of contract, torts, administrative law, and family law. Details...

Location:
  • Campbell River Campus
  • Comox Valley Campus
  • Port Alberni Campus
CRM 230 Criminal Law

This course offers an intensive introduction to the nature, purpose, sources and basic principles of Canadian criminal law. It will include analysis of what constitutes a crime, the basis of criminal responsibility, and the common defences used in criminal law. Fundamental legal concepts will be highlighted. The course includes a short community practicum designed to help students to apply their developing understanding of criminal law to that which occurs in local area courts. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
CRM 241 Introduction to Corrections

An introduction to the development and operation of correctional systems in Canada. Topics include the history of corrections, contemporary correctional institutions, relationships between inmates and staff, case management and treatment, community-based corrections, and life after prison. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
FRE 100 Motifs I

Motifs I and II together make up a complete introductory French program at the university level. With an emphasis on communicative proficiency, and based on the popular French in Action materials, the courses make use of video, audio and print material in order to develop the four language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing) and to introduce students to the diversity of the Francophone world. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
  • Distance Learning
FRE 101 Motifs II

This is the second of the pair of courses, Motifs I and II. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
  • Distance Learning
FRE 120 Motifs III

Motifs III and IV continue the development of the four language skills, self-expression, and cultural insight begun in FRE 100 and 101. Completion of French to this level is the prerequisite for entry into standard 1st-year university French. Details...

Location:
  • Distance Learning
FRE 121 Motifs IV

This is the second of the pair of courses, III and IV. Details...

Location:
  • Distance Learning
FRE 145 Intermediate French I

This course provides a complete review of French grammar presented within a cultural context. A study of selected literary readings will develop the student's ability to understand and compose short passages, together with typical and provocative articles that will promote active and critical in-class discussions of contemporary issues. Intermediate French I and II are strongly recommended for students who have taken French as a second language. Details...

Location:
  • Distance Learning
FRE 146 Intermediate French II

This is the second of the pair of courses, Intermediate French I and II. Details...

Location:
  • Distance Learning
FRE 265 Advanced French I

This course provides a continuation of the study of French grammar at an advanced level. A study of selected literary readings (French and French-Canadian), together with a variety of up-to-date and provocative articles and texts will allow the student to further improve both written and spoken French through practice in conversation, comprehension and composition. Advanced French I and II are strongly recommended for students who have taken the French immersion program. Details...

Location:
  • Distance Learning
FRE 266 Advanced French II

This is the second of the pair of courses, Advanced French I and II. Details...

Location:
  • Distance Learning
GEO 111 Environment, Society and Sustainability

GEO 111 focuses on the complex relationships between people and the environment. With emphasis on the ecosystems approach, it looks at the impacts on human activity and resource exploitation on the environment, and considers the potential for a sustainable society. Topics covered include; energy flow, biogeochemical cycles, ecosystem structure and dynamics, climate change, water resources, marine resources, biodiversity loss, protected areas and endangered species, human population growth, Ecological Footprint Analysis, and environmental world views. Details...

Location:
  • Campbell River Campus
  • Comox Valley Campus
  • Port Alberni Campus
  • Port Hardy Campus
GEO 112 Introduction to Human Geography

GEO 112 critically examines the complex relations between people and places through key themes and concepts in the cultural, urban and economic fields of human geography. Topics to be studied include: local and popular cultures and landscapes, disappearing peoples, concepts of nature, the agricultural revolutions, global agricultural restructuring, agribusiness, food security, urban and suburban processes, development issues in the less developed world, barriers to and the costs of economic development, globalization, deindustrialization, and social change in the world system. Details...

Location:
  • Campbell River Campus
  • Comox Valley Campus
  • Parksville High School
  • Port Alberni Campus
  • Port Hardy Campus
  • Port McNeill Centre
GEO 220 Intro to Climate Change: Human And Ecological Dimensions

This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to examining climate change and includes scientific, social, economic, political, and ethical perspectives. Some key areas of focus include climate science, vulnerability of human and ecological systems, observed and projected impacts, climate change adaptation and mitigation, policy debates, and current and future challenges. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
HIS 111 Canadian History: Pre-Confederation

This course provides a general chronological overview of Canadian history in the pre-Confederation era. It introduces some of the major political, social and economic events that shaped early Canadian development. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
  • Distance Learning
HIS 112 Canadian History: 1867 - Present

This introductory course provides an overview of Canadian history since 1867, concentrating on the main lines of political, social and economic development. It analyses important issues such as the Riel Rebellion, the shift from a rural to an urban society, the effects of the two World Wars, the Great Depression, the relations between English and French Canadians, and provincial demands for autonomy. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
  • Distance Learning
HIS 120 World History to 1000

This course surveys world civilizations from ancient times to the beginning of the Medieval era. It will include study of such areas of history as ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt, China, Japan and India; classical Greece and Rome; Africa and pre-contact America; and Islam, Byzantium, Western Christendom. The focus will be upon identifying broad themes, issues and patterns in world history, and upon accounting for political, social, cultural, intellectual, religious and economic change. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
HIS 121 World History of the Last Millennium, AD 1000-2000

This course surveys world history from the early Medieval period to contemporary times. The focus will be upon identifying broad themes, issues and patterns in world history, and upon accounting for political, social, cultural, intellectual, religious and economic change. The approach will combine sweeping analytical overviews with recurrent intensive investigation of selected societies and topics. Class time will be divided between lecture and slide show presentation, video documentaries, and discussion based upon common course readings and a series of student research exercises. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
HIS 135 World Mythology

The secret of life, explains the sacred tavern-keeper Siduri in an ancient Sumerian epic, is that there is no secret. "When the gods created man they allotted to him death, but life they retained in their own keeping", he tells the king Gilgamesh. "Fill your belly with good things, dance and be merry, feast and rejoice. Let your clothes be fresh, bathe yourself in water, cherish the little child that holds your hand, and make your wife happy in your embrace; for this too is the lot of man." This course will in some ways defy the strictures of Utnapishtim in returning to the questions that rest at the centre of world mythology. Who are we? Where do we come from? Where are we going? What is the nature of the cosmos? What is the relationship between the individual, the family, the community and the transcendent? How are life and death intertwined? We will discuss such questions in a philosophical context but the thrust of the course will be to use an historical and comparative framework that analyzes particular mythic traditions. Rather than attempt to encompass all of world mythology within a one-term course, we will focus upon the myths of Babylonia, Egypt, Greece, Rome, Northern Europe, Mesoamerica and the Pacific Northwest as case studies. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
HIS 215 History of Modern Europe I

This course surveys the world of early modern Europe from the flowering of the Renaissance in Italy and northern Europe, through the age of the religious wars in the seventeenth century, the eighteenth century Age of Enlightenment, and developments in eastern Europe and Russia, culminating in the great watershed of the French Revolution. In addition to covering military and political developments, the course also describes the changes wrought in the social and economic lives of the people of the emerging nation states of Europe. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
HIS 216 History of Modern Europe II

After a brief exploration of earlier 18th Century events, this course begins with the causes, course and consequences of the French Revolution. This survey course will then examine the major events of the 19th and 20th Centuries. Particular emphasis will be placed on industrialization, the growth of the nation state and imperialism. Social change will also be examined. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
  • Distance Learning
HIS 220 War, Memory, Myth and History

"Since wars begin in the minds of men," reads the UNESCO charter, "it is in the minds of men that we have to erect the ramparts of peace." This course explores how humans have struggled to understand, memorialize, and learn from war. Although the course uses a comparative thematic approach, there is a heavy emphasis upon twentieth-century wars, since this will both provide focus and allow us to probe the politicized relationship between lived memory and history. "War," notes the journalist Chris Hedges, "is a force that gives us meaning." This course will use monuments, memorials, museums, myths, paintings, photographs, weapons, flags, cartoons, family stories, novels, and movies as sources for thinking about the ways in which war is remembered and defined. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
  • Distance Learning
HIS 225 History of British Columbia

Major historical events are discussed, and their significance analyzed, in this survey course on British Columbia's history. The roles played by economics, geography, politics and social factors in shaping the province's development will also be examined. Details...

Location:
  • Campbell River Campus
  • Comox Valley Campus
  • Port Alberni Campus
HIS 260 Historical Reactions to Criminal and Deviant Behaviour

Once upon a time, a shipwrecked sailor washed up upon distant shores. He wondered about where he was. Then he saw a scaffold and gallows. "Thank god, "he exhaled, "I am in a civilized country." What is the relationship between civilization, crime and punishment? Why have dead bodies been the symbol of law at some times and places but not at others? Why did criminal trials begin? How can we account for the replacement of torture and the "bloody scaffold" with the rise of the penitentiary? This course will ask such questions as it provides an historical perspective on changing definitions of deviancy, societal reactions to violent or criminal activity, and public policies to counteract prohibited behaviour. The time span and geographical range will be vast; we will range from the Mesopotamia of 3,000 BCE to 21st-century North America. To provide focus, the curriculum will be organized around four intensive case studies: Crime and Punishment in the Ancient Near East and Mediterranean; Early Modern and Industrial Britain; American Justice from Colonial Times to Court T.V.; and Reactions to Crime and Deviance in 19th and 20th Century Canada and British Columbia. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
LIB 130 Intro to World Religions

This course is designed as an introduction to the world's major religions, with an emphasis upon those of the Abrahamic tradition: Judaism, Islam and Christianity. It combines an intensive focus upon individual living faiths with study of the different scholarly approaches to understanding religion. Instruction will combine intensive reading, seminar discussion and lecture presentations. Students who have previously earned credit in NIC's HIS 130 are not eligible for credit in LIB 130. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
  • Distance Learning
LIB 131 Eastern and Comparative Religions

This course combines an introduction to the religions of Asia with comparative analysis of some key organizing themes for the study of all world religions. It examines the origins and historical development, the sacred texts, the central tenets, the institutions and rituals of Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism, Confucianism, Taoism and Shinto. It also explores selected core concepts such as sacred space, sacred time, sacred rituals and sacred symbols in a comparative context that uses not only these seven eastern religions but also the Abrahamic tradition and other world religions as reference points. Instruction will combine intensive reading, seminar discussion and lecture presentations. Details...

Location:
  • Campbell River Campus
  • Comox Valley Campus
  • Port Alberni Campus
  • Port Hardy Campus
PHI 100 Introductory Philosophy: Knowledge & Reality

An introduction to selected problems in the philosophy of religion, metaphysics (theory of reality), and epistemology (theory of knowledge). Topics include the existence of God; the nature of mind and its relation to body; computers and consciousness; personal identity and mortality; freewill and determinism; the nature and sources of knowledge; and the justification of scientific beliefs. Details...

Location:
  • Campbell River Campus
  • Comox Valley Campus
  • Port Alberni Campus
PHI 101 Introductory Philosophy: Values & Society

An introduction to selected problems in philosophical ethics and social-political philosophy. Topics include the relativity or objectivity of values; egoism and altruism; the nature of right and wrong action; classical and contemporary ethical theories; applied ethical problems; the nature of justice; the relation between individuals and society; and approaches to the meaning of life. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
PHI 150 Critical Thinking

The course is designed to improve a fundamental ability needed for success in any discipline: the ability to think critically. The focus is on acquiring and sharpening the skills required for identifying, analyzing, and evaluating arguments. The emphasis is on reading and responding to a variety of real academic texts from across the curriculum. No specialized knowledge is presupposed. The course should make students more careful readers and more cogent writers. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
PHI 230 Contemporary Moral Issues

An examination of moral and social issues facing the contemporary world. Topics include animal and environmental ethics; conception and death in the medical context; hate literature and pornography; the ethics of violence. The principal aim is to teach students to think critically about their own views. To this end, philosophical attempts to apply various moral theories to these concrete problems will be assessed. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
PHI 240 Philosophy of Art

An introduction to philosophical attempts to understand the nature and value of art. The course surveys influential Western theories of art from the ancient to the contemporary period. Issues discussed include attempts to define art, the social value of art, censorship, the nature of aesthetic experience, artistic creativity, problems surrounding interpretation, and the relation of art to political and gender issues. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
PHI 260 Business Ethics

An examination of ethical issues arising in the contemporary business context. A number of classical ethical theories are introduced and applied to a variety of concrete problems such as whistle-blowing, product safety, employee rights, discrimination, international business, the environment, and investing. Emphasis is on mastery of the key ethical concepts and their application to real-life situations. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
POL 151 Law And Politics

This course is designed to provide an introduction to law, politics, public policy and the administration of justice in Canada. The study of the judicial system as a branch of government will be emphasized. The course will examine key provisions of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms as interpreted by the courts, with a particular focus upon those cases most directly connected to the administration of justice. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
POL 203 International Relations

An introductory course designed to acquaint students with some of the fundamental concepts, theories, perspectives and debates in the International Relations field. Topics will include such issues as international security (war, peace, military force; international organizations, international law and human rights; North-South politics; global environment crises; and the growth of a global political economy. Although it is not a course in current affairs per se, integration of contemporary world events and issues will be used to enhance critical understanding. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
PSY 130 Introductory Psychology I

This course covers the first half of Introductory Psychology. Topics include Critical Thinking, Neuroscience and Behaviour, Nature vs. Nurture, The Developing Person, Perception, States of Consciousness, Learning and Memory. Details...

Location:
  • Campbell River Campus
  • Comox Valley Campus
  • Distance Learning
  • Port Alberni Campus
PSY 131 Introductory Psychology II

Course covers critical thinking, intelligence, motivation and emotion, personality, psychological disorders and treatment and social psychology. Details...

Location:
  • Campbell River Campus
  • Comox Valley Campus
  • Distance Learning
  • Port Alberni Campus
PSY 235 Abnormal Psychology

An introduction to abnormal psychology, including mental disorders, assessment and treatment, the DSM-IV, and social, cultural and ethical issues. Details...

Location:
  • Campbell River Campus
  • Comox Valley Campus
  • Port Alberni Campus
PSY 250 Human Development From Conception Through Childhood

This course provides an overview of child development up to, but not including adolescence. The impact of genetics and environment, major theories of human development, methods for studying child development, cultural diversity, and development in the physical, cognitive, emotional and social spheres are included. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
  • Port Alberni Campus
PSY 251 Human Development From Adolescence Through Adulthood

This course provides an overview of human development from adolescence through old age. Topics include the impact of genetics and environment, development in adolescence and adulthood, cultural diversity, change and development in the physical, cognitive, emotional and social spheres, and death, dying and grieving. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
  • Port Alberni Campus
PSY 260 Psychological Explanations of Criminal and Deviant Behaviour

An introduction to the psychology of crime, including the application of psychological theories to the understanding and treatment of criminal and deviant behaviour. Students will examine factors that might help to account for antisocial action such as recurring violence and sexual offences. Biological, psychiatric, psychological and social/environmental explanations of deviant behaviour will be highlighted. CRM 101, PSY 130 and PSY 131 are recommended. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
SOC 110 Introduction to Sociology I

Introduction to Sociology I introduces the student to some of the major concepts and issues in the discipline of sociology, including culture, socialization, deviance, gender, suicide and discrimination. The course is designed to encourage the student to think more deeply about the relationship between personal troubles and public issues. Details...

Location:
  • Campbell River Campus
  • Comox Valley Campus
  • Port Alberni Campus
SOC 111 Introduction to Sociology II

SOC 111 is the second course in a full 1st-year university level introductory sociology course. It addresses specific social institutions such as the family and education, work and politics as well as social problems such as social change and inequality. The course is based on a critical evaluation of the major institutions of modern capitalism. Details...

Location:
  • Campbell River Campus
  • Comox Valley Campus
  • Port Alberni Campus
SOC 210 Sociology of Race, Ethnicity & Nation

This course provides a critical examination of the relations between ethnic groups and cultures emphasizing discrimination, the dynamics of global inequality, racism, colonialism and imperialism, assimilation and anti-racist resistance. The emphasis of the course may vary to respond to contemporary issues, although the experience of the racialized peoples and indigenous peoples in Canada will remain a key focus. Students are encouraged to consider the Canadian experience in a global comparative context. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
SOC 230 Sociological Explanations of Crime & Deviance

This course surveys a full range of sociological perspectives on crime and deviance including the social disorganization perspective, functionalist and strain perspectives, subcultural and learning theories, interactionist and social control theories a well as conflict and critical theories. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
SPN 100 Introductory Spanish I

Introductory Spanish I is a complete introductory Spanish program that provides the students with a solid foundation to communicate proficiently in Spanish as well as to function effectively within the culture in real life situations. Besides emphasizing language acquisition by providing a complete grammar scope, the content of Introductory Spanish I also presents important aspects of culture, customs and values of the Spanish-speaking world providing students with a deeper insight into its diversity while exposing them to authentic language. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
  • Distance Learning
SPN 101 Introductory Spanish II

Introductory Spanish II is a complete introductory Spanish program that provides the students with a solid foundation to communicate proficiently in Spanish as well as to function effectively within the culture in real life situations. Besides emphasizing language acquisition by providing a complete grammar scope, the content of also presents important aspects of culture, customs and values of the Spanish-speaking world providing students with a deeper insight into its diversity while exposing them to authentic language. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
  • Distance Learning
SPN 200 Intermediate Spanish I

This course is designed to further expand students' language skills in Spanish as well as their awareness of the Hispanic culture. It focuses on real communication in meaningful contexts to develop and strengthen students' speaking, listening, reading and writing skills while introducing them to the richness of Hispanic literature and culture. Details...

Location:
  • Distance Learning
SPN 201 Intermediate Spanish II

This course is designed to further expand students' language skills in Spanish as well as their awareness of the Hispanic culture. It focuses on real communication in meaningful contexts to develop and strengthen students' speaking, listening, reading and writing skills while introducing them to the richness of Hispanic literature and culture. Details...

Location:
  • Distance Learning
WST 100 Global Perspectives on Women

This first year level introductory course explores through feminist thought, where women are situated with regard to the political, economic and socio-cultural constraints that impact their lives. Core foundational concepts include the acquisition of gender identity, power and oppressive relationships as well as an introduction to a variety of "feminisms" through feminist theory. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
WST 101 Issues in Women's Health

The first year level course provides an introduction to women's health issues from a feminist perspective. Some historical perspectives and the underlying socio-political and economic context of health, as well specific health issues that impact women are explored. Relationships are drawn between patriarchy, capitalism, the medicalization of women's health issues and the impact on women's reproductive and human rights. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
ENGLISH WRITING & LITERATURE
ENG 107 Introduction to Creative Writing: Fiction & Non-Fiction

ENG 107 is a first year writing seminar focusing on method and craft in fiction and creative non-fiction. Fiction writing may include short stories or novel writing. Non-fiction may include creative essay writing, documentary, life-writing or biography. Students create a portfolio of work including both fiction and creative non-fiction. This seminar focuses on the practice of writing with an emphasis on learning the craft of writing through discussions, exercises and peer critiquing. Details...

Location:
  • Distance Learning
ENG 108 Introduction to Creative Writing: Poetry & Drama

ENG 108 is a first year writing seminar focusing on method and craft in poetry drama and screenplays. This seminar focuses on the practice of writing with an emphasis on learning the craft of writing through discussions, exercises, and peer critiquing. Students create a portfolio of work including both poetry and a play or screenplay. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
ENG 120 Introduction to Literature: Short Stories And the Novel

ENG 120 introduces the student to the short story and novel genres. The reading list will include a selection of works which are representative of fiction written over the last 100 years. As well, students will be introduced to basic literary theory through critical essays that focus on writers and their craft. Although the course includes a review of essay-writing strategies, it is assumed that students will have the writing and research skills necessary to produce their own critical essays based on the works they have read. Details...

Location:
  • Campbell River Campus
  • Comox Valley Campus
  • Distance Learning
  • Port Alberni Campus
ENG 125 Composition & Indigenous Literature I

ENG 125 provides a review of grammar, instruction in essay writing, and an introduction to literature written by First Nations authors. This course offers an alternative to the traditional first year English course. The materials include stories from the oral tradition, personal narratives, essays, and modern short stories. Like other first year courses, the assignments focus on analyzing material, organizing ideas, and expressing them in clear prose following correct procedures for documenting and presenting research. Details...

Location:
  • Port Alberni Campus
ENG 126 Composition & Indigenous Literature II

English 126 introduces the student to texts written in the 20th century by indigenous peoples from around the world, including North America. This course offers an alternative to traditional literature. Students will study the elements of indigenous fiction, poetry and theatre. Instruction is given in the composition of critical essays. Details...

Location:
  • Campbell River Campus
  • Comox Valley Campus
  • Parksville High School
  • Port Alberni Campus
  • Port Hardy Campus
  • Port McNeill Centre
ENG 202 Survey of English Literature I

This course surveys the significant works of English literature from the late Medieval and Renaissance periods, focusing on major authors: Chaucer, Spenser, Shakespeare, Jonson, Donne, and Milton. Major works discussed are The Canterbury Tales, Antony and Cleopatra, and Paradise Lost. Elizabethan and Jacobean lyric verse is also examined. The works are studied within the context of the philosophical, social, religious and political thought and conditions of the times. Details...

Location:
  • Campbell River Campus
  • Comox Valley Campus
  • Port Alberni Campus
ENG 203 A Survey of English Literature II

The student will survey English Literature of the 18th and 19th centuries, focusing on the works of major authors: Swift, Pope, Blake, Coleridge, Wordsworth, Keats, Emily Bronte, Arnold, Tennnyson and Browning. The student will also examine the philosophical, social and religious aspects of life in the Neo-Classical, Romantic and Victorian Periods. Details...

Location:
  • Campbell River Campus
  • Comox Valley Campus
  • Parksville High School
  • Port Alberni Campus
  • Port McNeill Centre
ENG 208 Creative Writing: Poetry

Eng 208 is a second year poetry writing workshop focusing on peer critiquing. Students will be encouraged to explore a variety of styles and structures in their work and will create a portfolio of polished poetry. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
ENG 230 Selected Topics in Literature

For 2016-17 the topic is narratives of crime and deviance. This course introduces the function of narrative and examines narrative method in a variety of genres such as poetry, fiction, drama, biography, autobiography, essay, film and textbook. The focus of study will vary according to instructor interest, and may include themes such as love and sex, war, crime, death, family, social justice etc. Students will be introduced to narratology and will examine the ways in which narrative structures shape understanding of the self and the world. Details...

Location:
  • Distance Learning
FINE ART & DESIGN
FIN 100 Introduction to Art History and Visual Culture I

This course is an Introduction to the History of Art that serves both as a chronology and as a primer to developing the visual and verbal skills that are essential to communicating effectively about visual culture. In conjunction with Introduction to Art History and Visual Culture II/ FIN 101, it attempts to build an understanding of the various methodologies employed in understanding the social, political and historical context in which art making takes place. Delivery is by lecture. It covers the time period between the cave paintings of prehistory to the 14th century. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
FIN 101 Introduction to Art History and Visual Culture II

This course is a continuation of the Introduction to the History of Art that began with Introduction to Art History and Visual Culture I/ FIN 100. It should serve both as a chronology and as a primer to developing the visual and verbal skills that are essential to communicating effectively about visual culture. It also attempts to build an understanding of the new methodologies employed in understanding the social, political and historical context in which art making takes place. Delivery is by lecture and seminar. It covers the time period from the fourteenth century to the mid-nineteenth century. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
FIN 110 Drawing & 2-Dimensional Language I

This course is an exploration of drawing and mark-making in its broadest sense. It is intended to provide students with a visual vocabulary that will enable them to express themselves more easily. An emphasis will be put on comprehension, analysis, and ability to make artistic decisions. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
FIN 115 Introduction to Printmaking

Various disciplines of printmaking are explored in this course, including relief (wood and linocut), intaglio (etching and aquatint), and serigraph (silkscreen printing). An introduction will be made to materials and studio tools. An open and expressive use of techniques will be emphasized. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
FIN 120 Painting: Colour & Perception

An introductory course intended to provide students with an overview of colour theories relating to design and fine art practices. Historical contexts and social and psychological implications will give the direction of study of the perception of colour in the visual arts of the 20th century. This class explores a variety of exercises from colour mixing to painting sessions with live models and still life subjects. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
FIN 121 Painting: Methods & Concepts

This is a studio course in which the student explores and experiments with colour usage, expanding upon and developing the knowledge and understanding of colour begun in FIN 120. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
FIN 145 Introduction to Photography

This studio course introduces the student to the basic use of photographic equipment and techniques, and the application of design techniques in the creation of photographic images. Basic darkroom and print development techniques are covered. Single lens reflex cameras are available through the Fine Arts Department for students to use in this course. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
FIN 200 Video + Sound 1

Video + Sound 1 introduces students to media arts practice through an exploration of time-based media: sound, video and installation. This will be achieved through a combination of lectures, technical workshops and directed projects. The aim of this course is to enable students to develop core competency in the use and operation of digital applications and an understanding of digital fundamentals so as to expand their creative range. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
FIN 210 Drawing & 2-Dimensional Language III

This course offers drawing as a direct means of expression and experimentation. Multimedia and non-conventional approaches to drawing are developed, while researching new ideas and broadening the student's visual vocabulary. An emphasis will be put on comprehension, analysis, and ability to resolve artistic problems. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
FIN 211 Drawing & 2-Dimensional Language IV

The theme of exploration and experimentation began in FIN 210 will continue in this course. Cross-disciplinary possibilities will be developed, and attention focused on individual interpretation of the medium. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
FIN 215 Intaglio Printmaking

This course is a more in-depth study of the materials and techniques of intaglio printmaking. Multi-colour printing and collograph will be taught. The storage, marketing and presentation of prints will also be covered. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
FIN 217 Serigraph Printmaking

Various methods and techniques of screen printing will be explored including photographic stencil making. An extensive study of studio practices relating to equipment and tools will be undertaken. Exploration of the medium as an artistic method of expression will be part of this course. The printing of editions and monoprints will be considered. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
FIN 220 Painting Applications I

This course develops awareness of painting in relation to Art in the 20th century. Concepts of visual language within the discipline of painting will be explored and developed using a wide variety of materials, surfaces and forms. Students will be encouraged to develop as individuals and to be self-motivated. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
FIN 221 Painting Applications II

This course is a continuation of FIN 220 developing and expanding the concepts of individuality. The focus will be on developing the students' awareness of painting in relation to 20th century art in general. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
FIN 230 Sculpture & Integrated Art Practices I

This studio course provides students with an introduction to diverse technical, aesthetic, and theoretical considerations for approaching, exploring and creating contemporary sculpture. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
FIN 231 Sculpture & Integrated Art Practices II

A continuation of FIN 230, this course provides students with a more in-depth approach to the development and creation of contemporary sculpture. Emphasis will be placed on developing and sustaining individual research and studio practice, incorporating diverse techinical, aesthetic, conceptual and theoretical considerations. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
FIN 235 3-Dimensional Applications (Ceramics I)

Clay will be explored as an expressive and functional medium, relating to 20th century ideas and concepts. The forming techniques employed will include: throwing, slip casting, press molding, coil and slab construction. Surface enrichment and colour will be developed using slips, terra sigillata, and glazing techniques. Firing processes will include electric kilns, pit firing, raku and high fire reduction. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
FIN 236 3-Dimensional Applications (Ceramics II)

This course is a continuation of FIN 235. It is intended to expand on the concepts and techniques explored in FIN 235. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
FIN 245 Photography II

This course will serve to expand the appreciation of and control over the photographic medium as an expressive, interpretive and metaphorical art form. FIN 245 is a studio class emphasizing learning through experience. Experimental approaches to the use of photographic images, ideas and content are emphasized. Students are encouraged to develop their own area of research and to build their artistic identity. Single Lens reflex film cameras are available through the department for students to use in this course. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
MATH & SCIENCES
BIO 103 Principles of Modern Biology 1

This is one of a pair of biology course for science majors that introduce students to the biological concepts necessary to continue into secondy-year biology. This is designed to provide students with a general survey of major areas of biology. Topics include biological chemistry, cellular organization and respiration, photosynthesis, and plant and animal structure and function. The course includes an extensive laboratory component. Details...

Location:
  • Campbell River Campus
  • Comox Valley Campus
  • Port Alberni Campus
BIO 110 Concepts of Biology l (Inhabiting The Human Body)

This course, containing similar material to that of BC Biology 12 and meeting the same requirements of BIO 060, is designed for non-science majors who require a science elective, or science students without the necessary prerequisites for BIO 102/BIO 103 and/ or BIO 160/161. Topics include an introduction to concepts in cell biology beginning with basic concepts in chemistry, cell structure, cell energetics, cell division and genetics. The last part of the course will focus on human anatomy and physiology. Throughout the course the connection between topics covered and human health will be emphasized. Details...

Location:
  • Campbell River Campus
  • Comox Valley Campus
  • Port Alberni Campus
BIO 111 Concepts in Biology II (Inhabiting the Earth)

This course is designed for non-science students who require a science elective, or science students without the necessary prerequisites for Biology 102 and 103. Topics include a brief review of cell division and genetics to provide a grounding for the discussion of evolution. The course will also provide an introduction to the diversity of life with investigations into the evolution of plant and animal structure and function. Finally, basic concepts in ecology will be introduced to provide a grounding for the discussion of current environmental issues. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus