Joy of Lifelong Learning

Sign up for semester-long academic courses at reduced rates as a Joy of Lifelong Learning student. Students aged 55 and up can access exceptional NIC faculty, facilities and learning opportunities from a wide array of more than 80 interesting arts, science, creative writing and fine arts academic courses.

This course is an introduction to the sub-fields of anthropology: physical anthropology and archaeology. Through readings and audio-visual material, the origins and development of humans and their cultures are explored, including the development of the civilizations of the Old and New World. Details...

Location:
  • Campbell River Campus
  • Comox Valley Campus
  • Port Alberni Campus
  • Port Hardy Campus

An examination of traditional and post-contact aboriginal societies using a culture area approach. This background will lead to consideration of the status of Aboriginal People in contemporary Canadian Society. Details...

Location:
  • Campbell River Campus
  • Comox Valley Campus
  • Port Alberni Campus
  • Port Hardy Campus

An introduction to the core concepts, basic data sources, and general research findings in the field of Criminology. A key focus is on elements of continuity and discontinuity between traditional and contemporary theories of crime, deviance, criminality, and social control. Particular attention is paid to the Canadian context. Details...

Location:
  • Campbell River Campus

An introduction to the structure and operation of the Canadian criminal justice system, including the police, courts, and corrections. Analysis of the patterns of crime and victimization, police discretion and decision-making; criminal sentencing; correctional institutions and community-based models; and the youth justice system. Patterns of contact and conflict between various social groups and the criminal justice system are also examined. Details...

Location:
  • Campbell River Campus
  • Comox Valley Campus
  • Port Alberni Campus
  • Port Hardy Campus

This course offers an intensive introduction to the nature, purpose, sources and basic principles of Canadian criminal law. It will include analysis of what constitutes a crime, the basis of criminal responsibility, and the common defences used in criminal law. Fundamental legal concepts will be highlighted. The course includes a short community practicum designed to help students to apply their developing understanding of criminal law to that which occurs in local area courts. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus

An introduction to the development and operation of correctional systems in Canada. Topics include the history of corrections, contemporary correctional institutions, relationships between inmates and staff, case management and treatment, community-based corrections, and life after prison. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus

This is the second of the pair of courses, Motifs I and II. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
  • Distance Learning

This is the second of the pair of courses, III and IV. Details...

Location:
  • Distance Learning

This is the second of the pair of courses, Intermediate French I and II. Details...

Location:
  • Distance Learning

This is the second of the pair of courses, Advanced French I and II. Details...

Location:
  • Distance Learning

GEO 112 critically examines the complex relations between people and places through key themes and concepts in the cultural, urban and economic fields of human geography. Topics to be studied include: local and popular cultures and landscapes, disappearing peoples, concepts of nature, the agricultural revolutions, global agricultural restructuring, agribusiness, food security, urban and suburban processes, development issues in the less developed world, barriers to and the costs of economic development, globalization, deindustrialization, and social change in the world system. Details...

Location:
  • Campbell River Campus
  • Comox Valley Campus
  • Port Alberni Campus

This course takes an interdisciplinary approach to examining climate change and includes scientific, social, economic, political, and ethical perspectives. Some key areas of focus include climate science, vulnerability of human and ecological systems, observed and projected impacts, climate change adaptation and mitigation, policy debates, and current and future challenges. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus

This course provides a general chronological overview of Canadian history in the pre-Confederation era. It introduces some of the major political, social and economic events that shaped early Canadian development. Details...

Location:
  • Campbell River Campus
  • Comox Valley Campus

This introductory course provides an overview of Canadian history since 1867, concentrating on the main lines of political, social and economic development. It analyses important issues such as the Riel Rebellion, the shift from a rural to an urban society, the effects of the two World Wars, the Great Depression, the relations between English and French Canadians, and provincial demands for autonomy. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
  • Distance Learning

This course surveys world civilizations from ancient times to the beginning of the Medieval era. It will include study of such areas of history as ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt, China, Japan and India; classical Greece and Rome; Africa and pre-contact America; and Islam, Byzantium, Western Christendom. The focus will be upon identifying broad themes, issues and patterns in world history, and upon accounting for political, social, cultural, intellectual, religious and economic change. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus

The secret of life, explains the sacred tavern-keeper Siduri in an ancient Sumerian epic, is that there is no secret. "When the gods created man they allotted to him death, but life they retained in their own keeping", he tells the king Gilgamesh. "Fill your belly with good things, dance and be merry, feast and rejoice. Let your clothes be fresh, bathe yourself in water, cherish the little child that holds your hand, and make your wife happy in your embrace; for this too is the lot of man." This course will in some ways defy the strictures of Utnapishtim in returning to the questions that rest at the centre of world mythology. Who are we? Where do we come from? Where are we going? What is the nature of the cosmos? What is the relationship between the individual, the family, the community and the transcendent? How are life and death intertwined? We will discuss such questions in a philosophical context but the thrust of the course will be to use an historical and comparative framework that analyzes particular mythic traditions. Rather than attempt to encompass all of world mythology within a one-term course, we will focus upon the myths of Babylonia, Egypt, Greece, Rome, Northern Europe, Mesoamerica and the Pacific Northwest as case studies. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus

After a brief exploration of earlier 18th Century events, this course begins with the causes, course and consequences of the French Revolution. This survey course will then examine the major events of the 19th and 20th Centuries. Particular emphasis will be placed on industrialization, the growth of the nation state and imperialism. Social change will also be examined. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
  • Distance Learning

This course combines an introduction to the religions of Asia with comparative analysis of some key organizing themes for the study of all world religions. It examines the origins and historical development, the sacred texts, the central tenets, the institutions and rituals of Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, Sikhism, Confucianism, Taoism and Shinto. It also explores selected core concepts such as sacred space, sacred time, sacred rituals and sacred symbols in a comparative context that uses not only these seven eastern religions but also the Abrahamic tradition and other world religions as reference points. Instruction will combine intensive reading, seminar discussion and lecture presentations. Details...

Location:
  • Campbell River Campus
  • Comox Valley Campus
  • Port Alberni Campus

An introduction to selected problems in philosophical ethics and social-political philosophy. Topics include the relativity or objectivity of values; egoism and altruism; the nature of right and wrong action; classical and contemporary ethical theories; applied ethical problems; the nature of justice; the relation between individuals and society; and approaches to the meaning of life. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus

An introduction to philosophical attempts to understand the nature and value of art. The course surveys influential Western theories of art from the ancient to the contemporary period. Issues discussed include attempts to define art, the social value of art, censorship, the nature of aesthetic experience, artistic creativity, problems surrounding interpretation, and the relation of art to political and gender issues. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus

An examination of ethical issues arising in the contemporary business context. A number of classical ethical theories are introduced and applied to a variety of concrete problems such as whistle-blowing, product safety, employee rights, discrimination, international business, the environment, and investing. Emphasis is on mastery of the key ethical concepts and their application to real-life situations. Details...

Location:
  • Campbell River Campus
  • Comox Valley Campus

An introductory course designed to acquaint students with some of the fundamental concepts, theories, perspectives and debates in the International Relations field. Topics will include such issues as international security (war, peace, military force; international organizations, international law and human rights; North-South politics; global environment crises; and the growth of a global political economy. Although it is not a course in current affairs per se, integration of contemporary world events and issues will be used to enhance critical understanding. Details...

Location:
  • Campbell River Campus
  • Comox Valley Campus

The course covers the following topics: research methods; biological bases of behaviour; consciousness; nature, nurture and diversity; development; sensation and perception; learning; and memory. Students are introduced to relevant psychological principles, theories and research findings, and are encouraged to develop an appreciation of the value of psychological research. Details...

Location:
  • Campbell River Campus
  • Comox Valley Campus

The course covers the following topics: research methods; thinking and language; intelligence; what drives us; emotions, stress and health; social psychology; personality; psychological disorders; therapy. Students are introduced to relevant psychological principles, theories and research findings, and are encouraged to develop an appreciation of the value of psychological research. Details...

Location:
  • Campbell River Campus
  • Comox Valley Campus
  • Distance Learning
  • Port Alberni Campus

An introduction to the biological bases of behaviour and mental functioning. Topics include neural structure, neural communication, motor and sensory processes, brain structure and function, rhythms and sleep, and regulation of internal body states. The biological basis for emotions, learning, and memory will be covered. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus

The course covers selected disorders listed in the current version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM), focusing on the nature of each disorder, biopsychosocial explanations of each disorder, and relevant treatments. Legal and ethical issues are also addressed. Students are introduced to relevant psychological theories and research findings, and are encouraged to develop an appreciation of the value of psychological research. Details...

Location:
  • Campbell River Campus
  • Comox Valley Campus
  • Port Alberni Campus
  • Port Hardy Campus

This course provides an overview of child development up to, but not including adolescence. The impact of genetics and environment, major theories of human development, methods for studying child development, cultural diversity, and development in the physical, cognitive, emotional and social spheres are included. Details...

Location:
  • Campbell River Campus
  • Comox Valley Campus

This course provides an overview of human development from adolescence through old age. Topics include the impact of genetics and environment, development in adolescence and adulthood, cultural diversity, change and development in the physical, cognitive, emotional and social spheres, and death, dying and grieving. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
  • Port Alberni Campus

The course introduces psychological perspectives on criminal behaviour, emphasizing theoretical and developmental issues, before considering specific crimes (e.g., white collar, domestic violence), and specific offender populations (e.g., sexual offenders, mentally disordered offenders). Students are introduced to relevant theories and research findings, and are encouraged to develop an appreciation of the value of psychological research. CRM 101, PSY 130 and PSY 131 are recommended. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus

Introduction to Sociology I introduces the student to some of the major concepts and issues in the discipline of sociology, including culture, socialization, deviance, gender, suicide and discrimination. The course is designed to encourage the student to think more deeply about the relationship between personal troubles and public issues. Details...

Location:
  • Port Alberni Campus

SOC 111 is the second course in a full 1st-year university level introductory sociology course. It addresses specific social institutions such as the family and education, work and politics as well as social problems such as social change and inequality. The course is based on a critical evaluation of the major institutions of modern capitalism. Details...

Location:
  • Campbell River Campus
  • Comox Valley Campus
  • Port Alberni Campus

This course surveys a full range of sociological perspectives on crime and deviance including the social disorganization perspective, functionalist and strain perspectives, subcultural and learning theories, interactionist and social control theories a well as conflict and critical theories. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus

Introductory Spanish II is a complete introductory Spanish program that provides the students with a solid foundation to communicate proficiently in Spanish as well as to function effectively within the culture in real life situations. Besides emphasizing language acquisition by providing a complete grammar scope, the content of also presents important aspects of culture, customs and values of the Spanish-speaking world providing students with a deeper insight into its diversity while exposing them to authentic language. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
  • Distance Learning

This course is designed to further expand students' language skills in Spanish as well as their awareness of the Hispanic culture. It focuses on real communication in meaningful contexts to develop and strengthen students' speaking, listening, reading and writing skills while introducing them to the richness of Hispanic literature and culture. Details...

Location:
  • Distance Learning

The first year level course provides an introduction to women's health issues from a feminist perspective. Some historical perspectives and the underlying socio-political and economic context of health, as well specific health issues that impact women are explored. Relationships are drawn between patriarchy, capitalism, the medicalization of women's health issues and the impact on women's reproductive and human rights. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus

ENG 209 is a second year university studies writing workshop that focuses on the method and craft of fiction. Students will examine the work of successful fiction authors and nurture their fiction writing skills through the workshop method. Students will create a portfolio of stories. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus

This course introduces students to contemporary Canadian literature including poetry,short fiction and the novel. Key topics may include nationality, regional identity, ethnicity, gender, postcolonial theory, and wilderness vs. urban influences. Details...

Location:
  • Campbell River Campus
  • Comox Valley Campus
  • Port Alberni Campus

This course is a continuation of the Introduction to the History of Art that began with Introduction to Art History and Visual Culture I/ FIN 100. It should serve both as a chronology and as a primer to developing the visual and verbal skills that are essential to communicating effectively about visual culture. It also attempts to build an understanding of the new methodologies employed in understanding the social, political and historical context in which art making takes place. Delivery is by lecture and seminar. It covers the time period from the fourteenth century to the mid-nineteenth century. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus

This course is an exploration of drawing and mark-making in its broadest sense. It is intended to provide students with a visual vocabulary that will enable them to express themselves more easily. An emphasis will be put on comprehension, analysis, and ability to make artistic decisions. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus

Various disciplines of printmaking are explored in this course, including relief (wood and linocut), intaglio (etching and aquatint), and serigraph (silkscreen printing). An introduction will be made to materials and studio tools. An open and expressive use of techniques will be emphasized. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus

This is a studio course in which the student explores and experiments with colour usage, expanding upon and developing the knowledge and understanding of colour begun in FIN 120. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus

This studio course introduces the student to the basic use of photographic equipment and techniques, and the application of design techniques in the creation of photographic images. Basic darkroom and print development techniques are covered. Single lens reflex cameras are available through the Fine Arts Department for students to use in this course. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus

The theme of exploration and experimentation began in FIN 210 will continue in this course. Cross-disciplinary possibilities will be developed, and attention focused on individual interpretation of the medium. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus

Various methods and techniques of screen printing will be explored including photographic stencil making. An extensive study of studio practices relating to equipment and tools will be undertaken. Exploration of the medium as an artistic method of expression will be part of this course. The printing of editions and monoprints will be considered. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus

This course is a continuation of FIN 220 developing and expanding the concepts of individuality. The focus will be on developing the students' awareness of painting in relation to 20th century art in general. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus

A continuation of FIN 230, this course provides students with a more in-depth approach to the development and creation of contemporary sculpture. Emphasis will be placed on developing and sustaining individual research and studio practice, incorporating diverse techinical, aesthetic, conceptual and theoretical considerations. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus

This course is a continuation of FIN 235. It is intended to expand on the concepts and techniques explored in FIN 235. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus

This course, containing similar material to that of BC Biology 12 and meeting the same requirements of BIO 060, is designed for non-science majors who require a science elective, or science students without the necessary prerequisites for BIO 102/BIO 103 and/ or BIO 160/161. Topics include an introduction to concepts in cell biology beginning with basic concepts in chemistry, cell structure, cell energetics, cell division and genetics. The last part of the course will focus on human anatomy and physiology. Throughout the course the connection between topics covered and human health will be emphasized. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus
  • Port Alberni Campus

This course is designed for non-science students who require a science elective, or science students without the necessary prerequisites for Biology 102 and 103. Topics include a brief review of cell division and genetics to provide a grounding for the discussion of evolution. The course will also provide an introduction to the diversity of life with investigations into the evolution of plant and animal structure and function. Finally, basic concepts in ecology will be introduced to provide a grounding for the discussion of current environmental issues. Details...

Location:
  • Comox Valley Campus